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busybeing's Message:

Kahluablast - understand where you're coming from! As a sped teacher, I wouldn't expect you to give multiple spelling tests, or even come up with a separate, even modified, spelling list if the child were receiving 100% of their ELA instruction from me... it wouldn't be at all appropriate and would likely overload/frustrate the student! I'd rather give the spelling list I'd chosen for that student to work on within your classroom if they had to be mainstreamed during that time (though again, I'm still confused as to why a student who seems to have such a severe disability is being mainstreamed during a core content period...?), and most likely using word work I already use in my classroom. I think you have some great ideas as far assistive technology for this student as well.

You sound like a thoughtful, collaborative gen. ed teacher to work with

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Spoofyone 12-10-2017 04:27 PM

Sorry but it sounds like the teacher's are busy and putting everything on you. sped teacher is caseworker/ the 2 teachers are passing the buck. I would talk to your principal or Vice- who's your supervisor- that school is not serving the student hardly--seems like it.

neanea 12-10-2017 12:36 PM

I guess since I am all new to this I just don't no what I am supposed to do. No one never eat down and told me what to do besides work with him on besides his little bit of what he does in Math and Reading. I'm not shared with what is in his IEP. I have no idea who his case worker is. I just know his two special ed teachers.
A big chunk of his day is Math and Reading outside of his spec ed class. We have a sensory room and I am now just told that I can bring him down if he gets a bit riled up. I guess I never knew what to do with him during phonics time or when the students are taking a ton of reading tests. I let him join in small group math and I modify what the class does it i can. I do this because I don't want to work on adding and subtracting because he does that for 45 min special ed and he doesn't want to do it for half hour more afterwards .

I guess since all these other subjects that he is exposed to throughout the day are not part of his IEP , no one really cares what he does.

Opal 12-09-2017 07:06 PM

I have a student with autism on my caseload who is in kindergarten. He has a 1:1 para.

I teach this student math and reading in my resource room for 1 1/2 hours a day.

The student gets multiple sensory breaks.

This student goes to phy ed, music, lunch , library and recess with his para.

He is in the K classroom during free play and 15 min of reading rti and group calander and snack time and other short group activities.

The para does not plan any academics. His job is to keep the student safe, provide him with sensory breaks and make sure he gets to speech and ot and follow his schedule and the kindergarten routine.

The K teacher makes sure the student is accessing all activities...such as art and sharing with me any academics she is doing so I can use what will work with my student.

This para is amazing!

lovemymonster 12-09-2017 07:46 AM

Welcome to life as a Para! It is most certainly the joint responsibility of the teacher and spec ed teacher to provide the programming and modifications for the student. You should be collaborating with them to create the activities and necessary accommodations to support his IEP goals. In a perfect world, this is how it happens. Sometimes, you have to expand your role just to keep the days from being a monotonous grind. So, if you have the freedom to "make work", then that must mean you are a fantastic Para and are trusted to use your judgment. Wonderful, if the job pay reflected that! My suggestion is to try and talk with the classroom teacher about specific ways she can accommodate this student and include him in her lessons. Don't be afraid to give ideas and suggestions - most teachers I have worked with are very receptive. There is no reason she cannot create a spelling list that meets his needs and have you create activities to help him practice. You probably have tons of ideas, but she needs to give you the framework.

GraceKrispy 12-08-2017 09:52 PM

I agree that his IEP needs to be revisited. If he's included in the gen ed classroom during those subjects and he's not capable of doing the work, he should have modifications written into his IEP for that. Paras aren't supposed to design the lessons. You should be getting instruction from either the sped or gen ed teacher in what modifications are appropriate and in the IEP.

Tounces 12-08-2017 05:41 PM

No, you should not have to modify the curriculum. The general ed teacher should be doing it. They usually have at least 3 levels of materials that come with the curriculum along with suggestions to modify it in their teacher editions. Talk to the case manager and let her/him know this is going on. The teacher should be treating this student as part of the class too. The classroom teacher could borrow materials from a grade level below or find something on their level. Our paras can reteach something Iíve done in the special ed room. They can also monitor progress and document it. We have sheets with the studentsí goals/objectives so they can check how they are doing on those. But to answer your question-the gen ed teacher needs to be modifying the curriculum and including the student whenever possible. You need to report that this isnít happening. Go to the case manager first. If that doesnít help, then go to the next level.

neanea 12-07-2017 07:05 PM

I guess that I am just frustrated because this is my first year as a para and no one really told me what is expected of the child. What I am supposed to do with him all day long when he can't participate with regular classroom work. His ELA spec ed teacher says to just work on cvc words or Sight Words, But With My Kid, I can only work on it so long each day before he burns out on it. Sometimes there is about 1 1/2 hours of Ela in class that he is present in. If he is to be in the regular class all day , shouldn't I be given more of an idea on what to work with him all day? Like I said, I can only practice sight words for so long.

Maybe I am just getting bored and maybe he is too. We have been in school about 14 or so weeks and we are doing the same thing day in and day out. Regular ed kids get a bit more variety, but it seems like the same thing over and over for my kid. I spend most of my modified teaching using his white board to make up work for him to do. I am sure he would like to use other materials but I am not provided with worksheets nor simpler books to use to give him variety. Maybe I just pictured this job differently.

busybeing 12-07-2017 04:33 PM

Kahluablast - understand where you're coming from! As a sped teacher, I wouldn't expect you to give multiple spelling tests, or even come up with a separate, even modified, spelling list if the child were receiving 100% of their ELA instruction from me... it wouldn't be at all appropriate and would likely overload/frustrate the student! I'd rather give the spelling list I'd chosen for that student to work on within your classroom if they had to be mainstreamed during that time (though again, I'm still confused as to why a student who seems to have such a severe disability is being mainstreamed during a core content period...?), and most likely using word work I already use in my classroom. I think you have some great ideas as far assistive technology for this student as well.

You sound like a thoughtful, collaborative gen. ed teacher to work with

kahluablast 12-07-2017 06:16 AM

Our kids who receive both math and ELA special ed support are serviced for 2 1/2 hours a day. I would question whether this student needs their IEP revisited.

It is the teacher's responsibility here, but if the student is significantly below doing anything with the class, it is easier said than done. I would be asking for input from the Sped teacher on what they are doing in sped that the student could do during my spelling time. Could they be doing half the words? How could I modify the activity for the student? But now I have to give several tests? Here in lies the tension between sped and GE. WHen we have had students the sped teacher usually works well with us to help decide how to modify things for them to make the integration time work for everyone. Our EA's are pretty good at asking and coming up with ideas, too, as most of them have worked with the same student for several years and definitely know them better than the GE teacher. That is much appreciated. Maybe this student could work with a low group and the EA doing some word work on words at their level? Or is there a spelling app that could be set up for that time period for the student to use with words at their level?

busybeing 12-07-2017 05:29 AM

I agree, the gen. ed teacher should be making some modifications. I was always told that I, as the special education teacher, always had to make modifications but there are also universal accommodations that the gen. ed teacher should be putting into place.

It's very very difficult as a special ed. teacher to have to create our own ELA and math curriculum from scratch to meet each student's goals and then have to heavily modify content area for general ed. teachers.

I guess I'm curious as to why this student is mainstreamed during ELA time in the gen. ed room though???

dee 12-07-2017 02:08 AM

He is HER stjdent. Teacher needs to differentiate for the students in her class, the highs AND the lows.

neanea 12-06-2017 09:14 PM

I am a one on one para for an autistic student. This student is not capable doing grade level work. He is out of the classroom for 1 1\2 hours a day for special ed reading and math. Who is typically responsible for providing work for this student to do while he is in the regular classroom?

Is it typical for the para to find ways to teach the student? Classroom teacher hardly interacts with the student, just leaves me to do all the teaching. Spec ed teachers just tell me to practice math and reading, but I can't do that all day. I find myself being the one modifying the curriculum on my own. Is it typical for the para to find and modify all the work the child can not do?

My student does not have any goals outside spec ed. Example, teacher has regular class work on spelling words, words which are too hard for my student. I don't get a modified list of anything. Teacher knows student can't do her list so she doesn't test student. I will make up my own spelling test, but it is just for having something to do. It is not required of the teacher. Is this typical that I have to do all the modifications and find work for my student to do?




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