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McLean's Message:

If you would like to integrate some fun, technology, and art into your parts of speech lessons, try a Parts of Speech Tableau poster.

Students get in groups, and you assign the part of speech. If you have them, provide students with books about their assigned part of speech to research the definition, types, and examples.

Students create a poster with the definition, etc. on it, then take photos with a digital camera of a scene that will depict the part of speech.

Ex. One student group in the class studied conjunctions. They took a photo of a student eating a sandwich with ham AND cheese. They wrote a sentence below the photo describing the scene, and highlighted the word "and."

After the posters are decorated and complete, the class can judge the best ones. The winners of the poster contest have the opportunity to visit a younger grade level and present the parts of speech.

Hope this helps...the kids loved it.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Anedre 04-16-2009 06:59 AM

Do you have an example of the mad libs?

egads 07-12-2007 06:12 AM

I am a high school foreign language teacher and am still surprised when students sit and struggle trying to decide which word in the sentence is the verb. Many of my students tell me at the end of the year for level one and two that they feel they learned more about English than either Spanish or French because they understand grammar and 'parts of speech' much more. I ask what about all the years in LA that this was taught, and they said that they learned it at the moment, but never really understood or had to use it until I was asking the same thing in Spanish/French. When introducing prepositions, direct or indirect objects/participles, I always present in english and use examples in English sentences before modeling it in the target language. I know you elementary and middle school teachers teach this even though my students swear they have never heard of a pronoun before in their life. Keep on plugging. Keep on trying.

wincha 12-01-2006 10:58 PM

At what grade is this taught? My child transferred schools in which she was learning part of speech since 1st grade now in 4th grade they do not teach this at all. I am already supplementing her education with Kumon and the vocabulary book they use from her old school(they do not learn vocabulary also) and am going to supplement her English at home also. Her old school used the Sadler books so I am continuing these lessons at home. She was in Catholic school recently moved to public in 4th grade.

jensw 11-12-2006 11:01 AM

Thanks for all the ideas, everyone.

MsYork 11-12-2006 10:07 AM

Quote:
Time is an issue.
No wonder kids don't retain stuff. Their brains are rarely given enough time to truly "marinate" skills and concepts before we move them on to yet another topic of learning.
Agreed. ...
cestabrook 11-10-2006 07:09 PM

Yes, think about what is truly important to teach when it comes to teaching the parts of speech. You can "worksheet" kids to death but they won't retain it if they have nothing to connect it to and if they see no real reason to learn it.


Use quality literature/novels to aide in teaching parts of speech.
White out vivid verbs and have students match or top the author's word choices.

Point out how:

using specific nouns adds to a writing piece (toy poodle, weeping willow tree, Valentine's Hill vs. dog, tree, hill)

of course possessive and plural nouns are necessary things to know to have correct conventions. These rules must be taught.

adjectives can be overused (articles "a" and "an" need to be taught)

apppostives (w/nouns) and dependent clauses (w/prepositions) can add to sentence fluency and variety.


Sometimes it is necessary- the "skill and drill," but it can be done without the "kill:"

Play Apples to Apples, Parts of Speech Scattegories (play like the board game but use parts of speech with clever categories), Parts of Speech Spoons, Parts of Speech Synonyms and Antonyms Around the World (just like you do with math facts) and have fun relay races (ie. magnet adverbs to board under correct categories- how, when, where)


YES, THE BRIAN CLEARY BOOKS MENTIONED ARE GREAT!

Ruth Heller's stuff is pretty good, too!

Check out the books by Marvin Terban!!!

YOU CAN SEE SAMPLE PAGES OF THE ABOVE BOOKS AT AMAZON.COM!

Have kids illustrate their own parts of speech books. Make them into flip books or use the varying pop-out techniques. They can share them with younger grades. They can at least make a few books collaboratively in small groups! I'm not kidding - many turn out just as good or better than Cleary's books.

Time is an issue.
No wonder kids don't retain stuff. Their brains are rarely given enough time to truly "marinate" skills and concepts before we move them on to yet another topic of learning.

fun_friend 11-10-2006 11:25 AM

The books you have referenced are the ones I used as a center myself! They are a fun way to approach the POS. I knew good ole Maryteach would object to a lot of attention paid to POS--keep us on our toes and mindful and the whole POS in perspective! I like Mad Libs too.

Scholastic has a set of books that approaches POS and other grammatical topics too. I purchased them for my home kids. Funny how 2 kids with parents who love LA and grammar and sentence structure and spelling aren't geniuses in this domain too! Thank goodness they inherited the reading gene if not the grammar one!

TeacherCarrie 11-09-2006 03:34 PM

I play Mad Libs. Even if they don't know them well, I start by writing them on the board and go over them verbally, have them read them to me, etc.

It makes it more fun, they want to know them, and they love raising their hand to try to give a funny word. I have students who normally don't participate, participate during Mad Libs.

MsYork 11-09-2006 12:52 PM

These books are lovely for POS:

# Dearly, Nearly, Insincerely: What Is an Adverb?
# To Root to Toot to Parachute: What Is a Verb
# I and You and Don't Forget Who: What Is a Pronoun?
# A Mink, a Fink, a Skating Rink: What Is a Noun?
# Hairy, Scary, Ordinary: What Is an Adjective?
# Under, Over, by the Clover: What Is a Preposition?

They're written by Brian P. Cleary.

McLean 11-09-2006 09:32 AM

If you would like to integrate some fun, technology, and art into your parts of speech lessons, try a Parts of Speech Tableau poster.

Students get in groups, and you assign the part of speech. If you have them, provide students with books about their assigned part of speech to research the definition, types, and examples.

Students create a poster with the definition, etc. on it, then take photos with a digital camera of a scene that will depict the part of speech.

Ex. One student group in the class studied conjunctions. They took a photo of a student eating a sandwich with ham AND cheese. They wrote a sentence below the photo describing the scene, and highlighted the word "and."

After the posters are decorated and complete, the class can judge the best ones. The winners of the poster contest have the opportunity to visit a younger grade level and present the parts of speech.

Hope this helps...the kids loved it.

maryteach 11-08-2006 08:42 PM

on the parts of speech. Yes, I teach them, but only so that I can speak to them in the language of language. POS instruction does nothing whatsoever to improve their reading or their writing. What it improves (and only sometimes) is their recognition of the parts of speech--not a lot of bang for your buck. The state test asks a few questions about it (but not many in my state) and there are just so many more areas in which you can be so much more effective.

I spend about a week and a half on this. We have little competitions (boys vs. girls) and the winners get jellybeans. Then I have them do a POS puzzle, in groups. It's a 9-square math puzzle that adapts really well to this. It's what my fifth period is doing tomorrow--but then we're leaving this, and going on to reading and writing. It's great to be able to define an adjective (I guess-I'm not really sure why) but I am sure that it won't improve their reading OR their writing--and that's what counts.

fun_friend 11-08-2006 08:23 PM

I don't have a copy of the play at my fingertips as all my LA stuff is in storage now that I'm teaching an exploratory class (careers). It came as part of a parts of speech bulletin board set. The theme of the set is parts of speech fair or carnival. It's a tedious bulletin board kit with many bits and pieces. The play is the best part!

If you are really gung-ho, you might explore diagramming. Some will argue that understanding grammar to the degree diagramming takes you is unnecessary and a waste of time. Diagramming can be a kind of graphic organizer though. Grammar questions are on the standardized tests that so much emphasis is placed upon. I like to teach diagramming--usually much later in the year (like round about test season!)

After the kids have learned the basics of diagramming, I like to make it a game. I have several whiteboard slates and dry-erase markers. I put the kids into pairs or trios and have them diagram a sentence I project, and I award points to teams that most accurately diagram. You can use the same game to have kids identify whether a word is a noun, adjective, adverb, or verb. You can make a Jeopardy-style game to practice grammar examples. Give the several teams sets of A-B-C-D cards (or have the kids make them) and make up a game that the kids respond to with the cards--it is quieter than having them call out the answer.

If you search on themailbox.com website, you might find a fun center-type activity you can pull together to have kids practice identifying the predicate adjective/noun. I used a lot of their ideas for center-type activities last year when teaching compound and complex sentences. It's fun!

jensw 11-08-2006 07:57 PM

Oh, I'm sure they've been taught it, too, but they haven't bothered retaining it.

Do you have a copy of the script for that play? I have the Grammar Rock, so I'll try teaching them some of those songs.

My other problem is that even the ones who do know what the parts of speech are won't slow down enough to *think* about what they're doing. I'm teaching predicate adjectives and predicate nominatives, and they're just wildly guessing. So I don't know if reviewing the parts of speech will even help.

fun_friend 11-08-2006 06:18 PM

I am certain that your students have been taught the parts of speech quite a few times over the course of their school careers. The teaching gurus say that the best way for students to learn something is to teach it to someone else. I have used a parts of speech play with 6th graders which was pretty effective. I've used those entertaining short books about parts of speech to reinforce what they should already know. I put the books on my chalk board tray and instructed each child to read them (kind of like a center) when they have finished other assignments. Also I've used Grammar Rock VHS. To me the most difficult part of speech to really get is the adverb. I'm sure you will get lots of cool strategies from the Proteacher folks here! I'll enjoy keeping up with your thread.

jensw 11-08-2006 04:14 PM

I'm teaching 5th for the first time, and I'm discovering that the majority of my class doesn't know what an adjective or a noun or an adverb is. They're vaguely aware that verbs do action.

How do you teach the parts of speech?




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