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bolthouse's Message:

Being a first year teacher or a teacher in general can be very tough; especially if you haven't had experience with classroom management whether in practice or professional. A way that you and/or your teacher could do is start by making classroom rules. Though I'm sure there are rules already set in the classroom but something I have seen is that when teachers allow students to be involved in updating the classroom rules they tend to follow them more often. As well as, they know the rules better and will notice when peers are not following the rules. Another way to get control of the classroom is to ALWAYS follow through with any and all actions, consequences, etc that you tell students will happen if/when their behavior or an action doesn't change or stop. The only way that this will work is if you and/or your teacher follow through with this every time and with every student, no exceptions. Because if one student is allowed to be exempt from consequences; this will only encourage other students to follow the misbehavior or bad actions of the student who didn't get in trouble. These are just two ways to start gaining control of the classroom. I would love to hear back about how things are going now.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
teacherinWA 11-15-2011 07:21 PM

There is a great classroom management curriculum called Positive Discipline. If this is a all day sixth grade this will be helpful. It worries me that you are with a supervising teacher has trouble with classroom management. How long are you with her and how long has she been teaching? Maybe you need to see if you can switch teachers???
If you are going to be taking over you want to work something out that you are able to implement. This book is really helpful. There are great activities to do with students to help them understand that the classroom is a community. They would be great activities for you to do if you are just taking over for small lessons.
It is your ST responsibility to have control over her class so be careful what you say because you do not want to step on toes.
Does she realize she doesn't have control over her class?

bolthouse 11-14-2011 10:01 PM

Though it may be tough for you to approach your supervising teacher about this topic you may just want to bring it up casually in conversation while you two are already discussing how to better manage the classroom. Because since there is a plan being implemented she should be discussing with you frequently which students are on track, which ones are not, and what may need to be altered in the plan. That would be the perfect chance, if given, to bring up maintaining consistency with consequences. And if it makes it easier to discuss just throw out there that you are learning about situations and plans like this in one of your classes and your professor stressed that it is extremely important to always follow through with consequences every time with every student. And a way to get your teacher to think about whether she does it or not is to just ask how she ensures that all students know the consequences and how she keeps from letting one student off the hook over another student. This will not only get you some answers to ways to better maintain your own classroom later on; but will also help your teacher to think about her own styles of follow through.

teachme4me 10-18-2011 01:25 PM

-The grade level is 6th grade. The teacher stands infront of the classroom and say I will wait.
-Well it looks like it all has been going better. My supervising teacher, has created and implemented a point system. It really has been working. Even when I was just doing a quick activity with them, I was able to have their attention.
-I understand about giving the consequence every time, but it seems like my supervisor teacher doesn't. I am not sure how to bring it up to her without being too forward. Help!!

tmcmorgan 10-13-2011 07:54 AM

I think that you really do need to post some rules for the class. In the past i have found that if you include the kids in the making of the rules it gives them some ownership, it also gives you a little more control when kids break the rules because they helped make them. I always try to keep the rules few and simple. Never really go more than ten. Also if you could word the rules in a positive way (ex. Rather than no hitting, I say keep hands to ourselves). This way you don't have a list in the room with the words NO and DON'T repeated. Make sure that when you and the kids set up the rules you build in concrete consequences for breaking them as well as having steps set up if the consequences are not followed. The kids may also need some sort of reward for appropriate classroom behavior. This may work to replace the undesired behavior for ones that are more in line with what you want in the classroom. Consistency is key, you need to be consistent in enforcing the behavior you want.

missenglish 10-12-2011 02:54 PM

I agree with what the other poster said about being consistent. You must set rules/expectations and the the students need to follow them. Failure to comply will result in a consequence. I see she gives detentions (lunch detention?) What I do is if a student wastes my class time with disruptions, I ask him/her to spend 5 minutes of lunch time with me. (waste my time - I waste yours) If they do not report, they have a reflection sheet/punish work sheet to fill out. If they don't do the punish work, it's an automatic office referral (school wide policy so it's easy to follow). There must be a consequence for not completing the consequence. (not reporting to the detentions she assigns)

Students need to know she means business to take her seriously - this means being consistent and following through with what is said - EVERY TIME.

bolthouse 10-11-2011 11:04 AM

Being a first year teacher or a teacher in general can be very tough; especially if you haven't had experience with classroom management whether in practice or professional. A way that you and/or your teacher could do is start by making classroom rules. Though I'm sure there are rules already set in the classroom but something I have seen is that when teachers allow students to be involved in updating the classroom rules they tend to follow them more often. As well as, they know the rules better and will notice when peers are not following the rules. Another way to get control of the classroom is to ALWAYS follow through with any and all actions, consequences, etc that you tell students will happen if/when their behavior or an action doesn't change or stop. The only way that this will work is if you and/or your teacher follow through with this every time and with every student, no exceptions. Because if one student is allowed to be exempt from consequences; this will only encourage other students to follow the misbehavior or bad actions of the student who didn't get in trouble. These are just two ways to start gaining control of the classroom. I would love to hear back about how things are going now.

EarthMonkey 10-10-2011 08:37 PM

What grade level are you talking about? What kind of classroom management is being used?

teachme4me 10-09-2011 08:08 PM

I am not sure what is going on, but it seems like being a first year teacher is hard. My supervising teacher has a tough time getting the whole class attention. She also is not able to get them to come to their detentions, what else can she do to make them aware that she is serious? What are some classroom management techniques that I could use or my supervising teacher use to get better control of her classroom?




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