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Ima Teacher's Message:

I can speak from both the sub and the teacher POV.

When do you have time to leave the teacher notes about your day? Do you stay after the bell rings to write your notes?
I always jotted down notes as I went, and then I stayed after for a bit to finish them if needed.

As a teacher, I prefer not to get a full-on narrative of every moment of the day. I leave a sub notes sheet with space for absent, tardy, and a couple of lines for work completed and behavior. That way I can glance at the right places and get on with my day when i return.


Also, if a lesson plan asks you to seat kids in alphabetical order, do you tell everyone to stand up until you call their name to sit?
I very rarely had a class where a seating chart wasnít left for me. I always leave a seating chart (with pictures) with my sub plans. It is always where the kids are already sitting. Iíd not spring a new arrangement on someone.


If a student gives you trouble more than one or two times, do you tell the student to go to the principal's office or do you call first someone in the office for help?
Depends on what you mean by ďtroubleĒ. Anything serious like fight or other dangerous situation is immediate call for help. General obnoxious or annoying behaviors I handle. I know that we are a PBIS school, so there are steps to follow before a student may be sent out of the room for things besides a major infraction. (Yes, subs are trained in the system.)

Secondly, lesson plans make me nervous. How do you have time to read through everything when you come in 30 minutes before school starts. Do you read only some parts and refer back to it as the class goes on?
Do a quick scan, then refer back as needed. Most leave short & sweet plans. I like to leave a paragraph per class period, and Iíll make a billeted list if needed. If there is something that needs to be explained more, Iíll attach another page. My sub binder is full, but s9meone could read the first page and run class if needed. The rest is just there in case it is needed.
With technology, I am surprised lesson plans are not expected to be emailed or posted online so you have the day before to look at it over to ensure lessons are finished.
The majority of jobs I had were people who were sick, and that wasnít something known far enough ahead of time to get things to someone. Even now, thatís not likely to happen. Plus, our sub coordinator calls people, so there isnít an online system. I will email plans to long-term subs.

Also, if you are expected to teach and you have no knowledge on that subject, what do you do in that situation?
Nobody ever asked me to actually teach a new concept. Sometimes I had to introduce something, but usuallly it was just independent practice or review.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
dietcoke99 11-10-2018 09:11 AM

I can reply to a couple of things, but now I am stressed that the district BY my district that I guess I screwed up in, is now going to ban me as they are in bed together (the first did not ban me, I quit, but it may have been coming). The only way they would know, I think, that was in both districts is that I'm in AESOP and both districts were in there. It seems that I've received less jobs than usual.

Anyway, I try to write notes as I go along. I may have to stay after school a bit, but much. After reading comments in this list, though, last time I didn't write hardly anything - absent students and then "lesson plan as given," or something like that. I'm in high school.

I can't even IMAGINE seating kids in alphabetical order. Another elementary thing, I'm sure. Sounds like a ton of work and time for a sub (or anybody). I've never even heard of it before.

I move a student who is disruptive. I tell them that I don't move students twice. Next time I send them to the office. This hasn't happened much, and when I do, the class is good for the rest of the period. I only call someone to get a student if they refuse to go (which happens more often than you would think). If I send a student I call the office once they leave and tell them to expect the student. If a student won't go, I tell them that if they don't go, I will have someone come get them. Usually they still don't go.

I try to get to school right after the secretary does, unless I have talked to the teacher before. Recently I got there before the crossing guard.

Technology is a pain in the butt. Recently, after trying for some time and asking students for help, I had to CALL THE OFFICE and ask for someone to come and help me get the video going. Earlier, I thought I had it ready to go, but then I couldn't get it to play.

One time I didn't have the password for her computer. I asked two teachers around me, one of them texted her, to no avail. I made up something for them to do, instead.

I don't know how the expect us to know how to do their technology - it is different in every class.

I have, at times, emailed the teacher ahead of time if I needed to. They are always glad that I did this because I have a valid reason.

One time recently the lesson plan on AESOP said "quat," and I didn't know what that was. She didn't reply so I asked the neighbor teacher next door for help the next day and it was supposed to be "quote," because AESOP couldn't do a "quote" symbol

If I don't know the topic, I simply do what is stated, nothing more - which is why I ask to be put in my subject as much as possible.

mrsd5 11-10-2018 07:02 AM

When do you have time to leave the teacher notes about your day? Do you stay after the bell rings to write your notes?

I write quick notes on the lesson plan if necessary with absences. During breaks, I add more on a separate sheet. Usually it's just the absences and a quick note of how class went. I don't write a book.

Also, if a lesson plan asks you to seat kids in alphabetical order, do you tell everyone to stand up until you call their name to sit?

I've never had that happen, but I'd probably have them stand along a wall and then walk around to each desk to call names. That's how I did it when I taught full time. They'd go to their desks row by row to cut down on the chaos.

If a student gives you trouble more than one or two times, do you tell the student to go to the principal's office or do you call first someone in the office for help?

I've always written a pass AND called the office before the student leaves the room. Cuts down on hiding in the bathrooms.

Secondly, lesson plans make me nervous. How do you have time to read through everything when you come in 30 minutes before school starts. Do you read only some parts and refer back to it as the class goes on?
With technology, I am surprised lesson plans are not expected to be emailed or posted online so you have the day before to look at it over to ensure lessons are finished.

What others have said. Look over all plans briefly, then concentrate on the ones before your first break. If time, I write the "Plan of Action" on the board so there is no confusion.

Also, if you are expected to teach and you have no knowledge on that subject, what do you do in that situation?

I do that all the time now that I sub high school. I'm a middle school person. Usually the teachers leave work that students already are familiar with. If not, I "fake it until I make it." Or ask a student who knows what is going on to help teach it. High school students are pretty good about that, especially in honors or AP classes.

Kailey123 11-10-2018 03:24 AM

You can start writing the notes during lunch and then just add in the afternoon after the kids have left. I always stay later than the official end of the day ("official" meaning the time the jobs lists on the website).

I've never had a lesson plan that asked me to seat kids alphabetically. That seems odd. Everyone has their own desk, usually with their names on it (I do elementary only).

I do elementary so I rarely have huge problems that might need a kid to be sent to the office. I did sent one yesterday, because he'd caused so much trouble on Thursday that I planned ahead for Friday. I decided to wait and see what the morning was like yesterday. It was pretty bad so at lunch I got together a packet of work for him -- mostly the same things the class was going to be working on that afternoon, plus a few extra things -- and sent him up to the office when we started Language Arts. My afternoon was very peaceful, and up at the office under the evil eye of the principal he got through all the work. I had arranged that ahead of time with the office so they knew he was coming.

Thirty minutes should be plenty of time to read through plans. You really only have to look at the first half because you'll have time at lunch (or whenever your first break is) to look through the second part.

I don't think you have to worry about being expected to teach with no knowledge of a subject (it sounds like you're doing middle or high school?) -- I think most teachers don't expect a sub to show up who knows that subject, unless it's someone they've used before who they know can do that subject. I know there are retired teachers who will continue to sub at their former school so teachers know they can count on them to carry on with the subject. At elementary level I do a lot of teaching but the only thing I have to brush up on occasionally is advanced 5th grade math. I swear, kids these days are way smarter than we ever were back in the old days.

Ima Teacher 11-10-2018 03:22 AM

I can speak from both the sub and the teacher POV.

When do you have time to leave the teacher notes about your day? Do you stay after the bell rings to write your notes?
I always jotted down notes as I went, and then I stayed after for a bit to finish them if needed.

As a teacher, I prefer not to get a full-on narrative of every moment of the day. I leave a sub notes sheet with space for absent, tardy, and a couple of lines for work completed and behavior. That way I can glance at the right places and get on with my day when i return.


Also, if a lesson plan asks you to seat kids in alphabetical order, do you tell everyone to stand up until you call their name to sit?
I very rarely had a class where a seating chart wasnít left for me. I always leave a seating chart (with pictures) with my sub plans. It is always where the kids are already sitting. Iíd not spring a new arrangement on someone.


If a student gives you trouble more than one or two times, do you tell the student to go to the principal's office or do you call first someone in the office for help?
Depends on what you mean by ďtroubleĒ. Anything serious like fight or other dangerous situation is immediate call for help. General obnoxious or annoying behaviors I handle. I know that we are a PBIS school, so there are steps to follow before a student may be sent out of the room for things besides a major infraction. (Yes, subs are trained in the system.)

Secondly, lesson plans make me nervous. How do you have time to read through everything when you come in 30 minutes before school starts. Do you read only some parts and refer back to it as the class goes on?
Do a quick scan, then refer back as needed. Most leave short & sweet plans. I like to leave a paragraph per class period, and Iíll make a billeted list if needed. If there is something that needs to be explained more, Iíll attach another page. My sub binder is full, but s9meone could read the first page and run class if needed. The rest is just there in case it is needed.
With technology, I am surprised lesson plans are not expected to be emailed or posted online so you have the day before to look at it over to ensure lessons are finished.
The majority of jobs I had were people who were sick, and that wasnít something known far enough ahead of time to get things to someone. Even now, thatís not likely to happen. Plus, our sub coordinator calls people, so there isnít an online system. I will email plans to long-term subs.

Also, if you are expected to teach and you have no knowledge on that subject, what do you do in that situation?
Nobody ever asked me to actually teach a new concept. Sometimes I had to introduce something, but usuallly it was just independent practice or review.

akrishna 11-09-2018 11:09 PM

Substitute teacher starting out here...

I substituted as teacher's aid my first time so it wasn't bad but I'm hoping to do this alone someday.

When do you have time to leave the teacher notes about your day? Do you stay after the bell rings to write your notes?

Also, if a lesson plan asks you to seat kids in alphabetical order, do you tell everyone to stand up until you call their name to sit?

If a student gives you trouble more than one or two times, do you tell the student to go to the principal's office or do you call first someone in the office for help?

Secondly, lesson plans make me nervous. How do you have time to read through everything when you come in 30 minutes before school starts. Do you read only some parts and refer back to it as the class goes on?
With technology, I am surprised lesson plans are not expected to be emailed or posted online so you have the day before to look at it over to ensure lessons are finished.

Also, if you are expected to teach and you have no knowledge on that subject, what do you do in that situation?




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