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Amy L's Message:

If your lessons can involve individual students (think role playing a problem or event, using a manipulative, etc.), they may try to be more positive/quiet in an effort to be chosen.
Remember to allow movement if/when possible, within the lesson.
Directly coach them on how to be a good listener, model, allow for practice, praise.
If a discussion... try using a 'talk' stick (toy microphone, stuffed animal, wand, etc.); something only the speaker is allowed to hold; conversely, only the person with the stick may speak at that time.
Catch them being good; raise colors for positive students (or whatever your management system uses)... incentive for those not being attentive.
Be consistent in your expectations/consequences.

It will get better! Have fun.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
JBfan423 09-28-2013 10:44 AM

Thank you all for your great suggestions! You have some great ideas and I look forward to implementing them into my future lessons!

MissPink93 09-26-2013 09:48 AM

I know what you mean because my internship is in a first grade class as well. I know they become restless and they do talk to their neighbor if they are no longer paying attention. Sometimes I take brain breaks and play simon says for about two minutes to give them a chance to talk and get their wiggles out and then right before sitting back down I explain that we have some more to learn and I countdown so they'll know that it is time to be quiet and listen. At my school we also do the "bucket filler" behavior so if I see students that are listening I hand out bucket fillers to make all students want to listen.

Mister_J 09-26-2013 09:41 AM

I've worked with first graders a lot as well. I found that the key to keeping them focused is a lot of hands-on activity. If you think about it, this age group is still pretty fresh to the school scene, so sometimes formal lessons with "worksheets" don't always keep them focused. Try different types of performance assessments with your lessons as well as hands-on activities. I know you can't always plan hands-on activites in every lesson, so another great method is using incentives and rewards. (Most elementary schools have some sort of prize/reward system)

I hope this helps, you're with a great age group. If all else fails just have fun with it. If you're having fun the students will have fun too and be more motivated to listen

Amy L 09-25-2013 11:50 AM

If your lessons can involve individual students (think role playing a problem or event, using a manipulative, etc.), they may try to be more positive/quiet in an effort to be chosen.
Remember to allow movement if/when possible, within the lesson.
Directly coach them on how to be a good listener, model, allow for practice, praise.
If a discussion... try using a 'talk' stick (toy microphone, stuffed animal, wand, etc.); something only the speaker is allowed to hold; conversely, only the person with the stick may speak at that time.
Catch them being good; raise colors for positive students (or whatever your management system uses)... incentive for those not being attentive.
Be consistent in your expectations/consequences.

It will get better! Have fun.

JBfan423 09-25-2013 11:39 AM

Thanks! I will definitely try that when I teach my next lesson.

ead2014 09-24-2013 12:27 PM

During my lessons, I find it helpful to change up and use different management techniques from the classroom teacher. I find that my students respond to new techniques because they like change. My teacher is very negative so I try saying things like "I really like the way _______ is sitting and facing me." Misbehaving students really tend to correct their behavior because they want that positive praise. I've learned that changing a student's color on the behavior chart can really cause that student to continue the behavior because they don't care and think they can't earn back their color.

JBfan423 09-24-2013 12:09 PM

I am an intern in a first grade classroom and taught my first lesson today. During the lesson, some of the students were very talkative and were not paying attention to the lesson. I implemented the classroom behavior management system, but they were still very antsy. What are some other behavior management techniques that I can use during future lessons to keep their attention? Thanks!




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