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Strawberry_K5's Message:

I had wanted to read the “The Kissing Hand” by Audrey Penn during the first two days of school…have one parent from each family send a cut-out of their hand for their child and then have the children make a cut-out of their hand to give to their parent/s. (For those of you who have not read this book, it is about a raccoon who does not want to go to school. The mother raccoon kisses her son’s hand to comfort him. When he misses her, he can “press [his] hand to [his] cheek and think ‘Mommy loves [me]’.”) I received my roster only to find out that 3 out of 13 of my children live with their grandparents; in all three situations the grandparents have custody of the student. How do I handle this situation? I come from a divorced family and have a better understanding of that type of home situation. This is something I am not familiar with and feel like I will be tip-toeing around all year. I want to be as sensitive as possible to each child. What do I do?

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Strawberry_K5 08-04-2006 02:45 PM

Thank you for the idea. I really like the poem! There are so many wonderful ideas that I find through this website! I'm so glad that I have options for this book now because I really wanted to use it in my classroom.

NAM_KDGN 08-03-2006 08:07 PM

I have used the story THE KISSING HAND and it"s sequel A POCKETFUL OF KISSES for the last three years during the first two days of school. The children really love it because they get to dip their hands in large inkpads to send their handprints home to their parents (great for safety records) and they put a heart sticker in the middle. They also get a Hershey's kiss from me at the end of the story because I want them to know that I also love and accept them as their classroom teacher. With the hand print I also send a poem that says "I love it when you hold me, I love it when you're near..
you always keep me safe and warm and make me feel so dear; So here is a little gift to keep while I'm away, to let you know "I love you too" and will soon be back to stay."

Strawberry_K5 08-01-2006 05:47 PM

I love that you suggested the ideas of listing family or people that love them to introduce the book! To modify that idea--if I decided to use the book to encourage excitement about school--I could discuss the students being a community, or family; adding myself and their peers to the list of people that care about them.

This situation has definitely brought to my attention being sensitive to each family. I'm glad that there are three students in the same family situation; it will be a constant reminder for me to monitor my letters/documents home, and they will not feel alone.

jsn 07-30-2006 05:32 AM

I also read "The Kissing Hand", but I go about it in another way. Instead of relating it their families loving them, I turn it around to get them excited about coming back to school.

After I'm finished reading it, I put a red heart sticker on each of their palms and tell them that when they go home and hold their hand to their cheek, they can think of how I miss them and can't wait to see them in school the next day.

I use it more as a means to take away some initial apprehension and for them to look forward to coming back.

Less tears that way!

BookMuncher 07-26-2006 04:36 PM

I think that there probably are some books that you will have to be much more careful about this year, but I think this is one where the meaning will stay the same. When you write your letter, just explain that it's about a raccoon and her loved one and then have the discussion with your class, like the poster above said.

You might as well also take that opportunity with your kiddos to let them know that when you say "family" you mean loved ones. Maybe switch some of what you were planning on doing this first week to talk all about what a family is.

(Make sure you address all letters to "Families" instead of parents)

brett158 07-26-2006 02:09 PM

I would just have a short discussion asking kids how many different people love them. Maybe right all the names on the board and have the kids tell who loves them.....Im sure you will get a TON of responses, dogs, uncle/aunt, brother etc. Then say today we are going to read a story about a mommy who loves someone. When doing the activity the kids can just replace whoever loves them for mommy..."grandma loves me". I wouldnt worry too much about it.

Strawberry_K5 07-26-2006 01:59 PM

I had wanted to read the “The Kissing Hand” by Audrey Penn during the first two days of school…have one parent from each family send a cut-out of their hand for their child and then have the children make a cut-out of their hand to give to their parent/s. (For those of you who have not read this book, it is about a raccoon who does not want to go to school. The mother raccoon kisses her son’s hand to comfort him. When he misses her, he can “press [his] hand to [his] cheek and think ‘Mommy loves [me]’.”) I received my roster only to find out that 3 out of 13 of my children live with their grandparents; in all three situations the grandparents have custody of the student. How do I handle this situation? I come from a divorced family and have a better understanding of that type of home situation. This is something I am not familiar with and feel like I will be tip-toeing around all year. I want to be as sensitive as possible to each child. What do I do?




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