ProTeacher Community - Reply to Topic




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


Post Your Reply!

Singvogel's Message:

In theory, holding students to community standards is a nice thought.

In practice, it works for average kids with average misbehaviors. It is laughed off by kids with extreme behaviors. I actually overheard a student who had been sent to the office tell his friends, "Ooo- I got a REAL GOOD talking-to." Yes, kids do try to pass off office visits as nothing, but we actually had kids who physically hurt another come back to class smiling ear-to-ear after having been given a treat or toy.

Some of the practices do work for some students. The emphasis on community-building is good.

Members have more posting options! Sign Up Free!
Random Teacher Question
Name:
Type a guest name (or sign up for a free account)
Descriptive Title (Please do type a title):
  
Message:

Additional Options
Not a member? See the great features you're missing
Did you know? ProTeacher is a FREE service

Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Marcee 04-24-2019 03:03 PM

In theory, it's great. I have NEVER seen it work in practice where it has the desired outcome.

The world would be a great place if we could all just "talk out our feelings" with those with whom we disagree. Can you imagine world leaders doing that? Um, no.

Izzy23 04-23-2019 06:24 PM

Never seen it work at any school I've been at. Behavior gets worse, because the kids have no consequences and feel empowered. I had a kid break the window of my classroom door and return to class 20 minutes later - didn't have to apologize or anything because he "wasn't ready." Fun fact: They're never ready.

Maybe it would work combined with natural, logical consequences, but that would be a lot of work and I've never had an admin who wants to do that much.

Haley23 04-18-2019 04:13 PM

We've had more success with it with my current admin, because they ALSO do consequences, especially for severe behaviors. They recognize that for certain incidents, a "make it right" simply isn't appropriate.

Previous admin only did restorative practices and the kids figured out very quickly that there were no consequences and misbehavior led to 1:1 time with adults- often "fun" adults like the counselors who let them play games and gave them snacks during/after these "restorative conversations." Like anything else, it worked for minor behaviors- the stuff any system would work for. It did nothing for severe behaviors, and once the more "tier 2" kids started seeing all the perks "tier 3" behavior kids were getting, they escalated their behaviors so they could get that stuff too!

Yes, suspensions went way down. That didn't mean the behaviors stopped. It meant they stopped giving suspensions. With my current admin, any destruction or violence is an automatic suspension, and at the end of the suspension the student may not come back in until parents have met with the admin and come up with a plan as to how they're going to support the issues at home.

Don't get me wrong, we still deal with issues, but it is night and day from the previous admin.

anna 04-18-2019 12:11 PM

It's a new buzzword that means make sure the offender gets a say in solving the problem that very often the offender started. This tactic is not a new idea at all. Just a lot of money generating pd and books have been created. It's the new "holy grail."
The problem with this buzzword these days is there are no consequences for offenses nor is there counseling,psychological or mental health support for the offending students.Teachers are left with serious behavior problems that disrupt the classroom all day long. And the district now gets to claim that the suspension rate for minority groups is magically lower now.

If I were a new teacher looking for work I'd be very careful where I agreed to begin my career. The lack of support for the other kids in the class is gone and the serious offender is now in control of the class.

Singvogel 04-18-2019 12:05 PM

In theory, holding students to community standards is a nice thought.

In practice, it works for average kids with average misbehaviors. It is laughed off by kids with extreme behaviors. I actually overheard a student who had been sent to the office tell his friends, "Ooo- I got a REAL GOOD talking-to." Yes, kids do try to pass off office visits as nothing, but we actually had kids who physically hurt another come back to class smiling ear-to-ear after having been given a treat or toy.

Some of the practices do work for some students. The emphasis on community-building is good.

SoCalTeach 04-18-2019 09:07 AM

I feel it doesn't work most of the time. It's used INSTEAD of discipline. As long as kids "talk it out" (bully and bullied, for example) and shake hands, that's it. I find it's a cop-out. My opinion.

amyjack 04-18-2019 04:26 AM

Any thoughts on restorative discipline? Pros and cons?




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:00 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net