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mommy9298's Message:

Exactly applesaucencr. I taught third for years. This year p moved me to first grade. Iím going back to the basics. The skills that the third graders were lacking gets worse every year. Common core is not working. Our test scores are the worst they have ever been. We need to go back to the basics. We turned out ok.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
falalala2929 09-22-2019 04:43 PM

I agree with you all. I teach ELL children of many diverse language backgrounds, and this year we are told we must move more to the "proficient" level on our state tests. Duh....the reason they are "ELL" or limited English is because they are NOT yet "proficient" in English. I work with younger newcomers and they must sit through all the Common Core crap about narrative writing, or they must write a "how to" book over several pages. Most don't know how to write their names yet.

Yes, the world of education has gone crazy. All of our admins telling us what to do were either high school teachers, or taught very short periods of time before heading back to collage and getting a leadership degree. They have no idea!!

elem2middle 09-22-2019 12:23 PM

Moving from elementary to middle school 5 years ago, I can tell you the lack of social and emotional skills really becomes an issue at this age. Babies are not being born smarter than they were 50 years ago and therefore what is developmentally appropriate has not changed. We are pushing young children academically and neglecting other essential skills. Look at the increase in anxiety, depression, and suicides in children today.

Meanwhile teachers are being expected to do more than evr with less resources and larger classes. Seems like those at the state level think technology and personalized education is the answer to everything. While technology is a wonderful tool it doesnít replace good old fashion teaching. As a teacher I spend time wondering where the line is between engaging students and creating students who believe they must be entertained at all times. The real world will be a shock to some of these kiddos. They will be clueless when it comes to communicating with others face to face and showing respect for your boss. Not to mention the fact that adult life is full of lots of responsibilities that arenít optional or fun.

desert flower 09-21-2019 10:27 PM

I totally agree with all of you! Nineteen years in. Very sad about the state of education. I don't see it getting better any time soon. Happy to be retiring in a couple of years.

Violets2 09-21-2019 04:03 PM

Iím glad it not just me. Iím a 30 year teacher and wish curriculum directors would read The Hurried Child by David Elkins (I believe heís the author).

Izzy23 09-21-2019 02:51 PM

One thing that I think is hurting our kids is the lack of instruction in social studies and science. I teach 4th, and the kids have no clue - they can't identify the oceans, don't know who Harriet Tubman is, have no idea what makes day/night. Losing this basic knowledge makes it really, really hard to teach higher level reading. You need a certain amount of background knowledge to comprehend what you're reading, instead of just decode words.

And I'm all for going back to teaching grammar and spelling basics. You can't write a 3-paragraph essay if you can't write a sentence.

TeacherPK6 09-21-2019 01:16 PM

I so agree! Don't have Common Core in my state, but I still believe the expectations we have are not developmentally appropriate. Many students can and do reach them of course, but under a lot of pressure! Most of those who don't are not "struggling learners" but just need more time and maturity.

eliza4one 09-21-2019 11:48 AM

Quote:
I don't care if a 1st grader knows what "personal narrative" means if they can barely produce a readable sentence.

If basic foundational skills were solid, you would see a lot less gaps and need for intervention in 3rd grade and up.
SO agree! I am glad I taught with "old school" teachers my first couple of years. I SO get the importance of teaching the basics. I've only been teaching 16 years, but in comparison to my new colleagues, it might as well be eons in the years' difference between us. They don't get the importance of ensuring they are teaching the basics. Instead they are Pinterest/TPT teachers. Can't think for themselves. Very frustrating for me, but I just do what I know is best. Thankfully, we are not tied to Common Core. Honestly, even if I were, I'd shut my door and do what I know to be best. I couldn't do otherwise.

My class is far from boring, btw. My students are very engaged and their parents report that they LOVE coming to school each day. It IS possible to do both. Teach the basics/make learning fun/engaging! In truth, that is what/how it USED to be!!

I know not all new(er) teachers are like my 2 new colleagues, so I am ONLY speaking of those 2, not generalizing.
Sbkangas5 09-21-2019 10:33 AM

I truly believe that a majority of the behaviors we are seeing (at least in elementary) is directly tied to the fact that we don't have time to really focus on social and emotional skills in kinder and first grade. And it breaks my heart when students entering kindergarten are already labeled as "behind" or "low" because they don't know their alphabet or can't count to 20. We need to take a page from every other country that outscores ours and not start academics until age 7 or 8, when they are develpmentally ready.

Countingdown 09-21-2019 10:28 AM

Now, the question is, how do we fix it. Were there elementary teachers in on the development of the cc standards?


The answer to this question is no. Teachers were not involved in the writing of common core. At least they werenít in the early elementary reading ones. I earned a masters in literacy in 2014. One of the first things my professors said was that there was no one involved in the early elementary reading standards that worked with or did research on early reading. We are teaching standards that have no basis in experience in early reading.

seenthelight 09-21-2019 08:16 AM

Itís making teaching impossible. Not only are academic skills lacking because theyíve been surface taught instead of truly ingrained, but social skills are woefully acting. I spend half my time wondering if Iím teaching 2 year olds. The fighting, the bickering, the rudeness, the disrespect, the lack of basic societal norms. These kids cannot function as a community. Someone in power needs to read All I Need to Know, I Learned in Kindergarten. Guess what isn't on that list? Reading at a Level D, being able to answer higher order thinking questions, or addition and subtraction.

kahluablast 09-21-2019 06:23 AM

Quote:
I think the biggest problem, even before Common Core, was the movement away from from focus g on basic skills in K through 2. I truly believe those concrete skills like math facts, decoding, spelling, basic punctuation and sentence structure, how to behave in a group, etc should be the main focus of early childhood.
. I think that this is true clear through elementary. 4 and 5 are just gaining skills enough to move beyond basics and it might be appropriate to start adding in some of the connecting and "deeper level thinking" skills by then. Even in 3rd grade there are many children who are still maturing and developing skills to read and do basic math.

I kind of thought it was our demographics changing that is making our skill set lower each year, but thinking about it, it probably is just the lack of emphasis on skills. I think, for my school anyway, that it began with the adoption of CCSS.

Now, the question is, how do we fix it. Were there elementary teachers in on the development of the cc standards?
mommy9298 09-21-2019 05:50 AM

Exactly applesaucencr. I taught third for years. This year p moved me to first grade. Iím going back to the basics. The skills that the third graders were lacking gets worse every year. Common core is not working. Our test scores are the worst they have ever been. We need to go back to the basics. We turned out ok.

applesaucencr 09-21-2019 04:52 AM

I think the biggest problem, even before Common Core, was the movement away from from focus g on basic skills in K through 2. I truly believe those concrete skills like math facts, decoding, spelling, basic punctuation and sentence structure, how to behave in a group, etc should be the main focus of early childhood. It is a shame that those things were deemed boring by adults because I find young children are actually engaged by those activities and feel successful because they are developmentally appropriate.

I don't care if a 1st grader knows what "personal narrative" means if they can barely produce a readable sentence.

If basic foundational skills were solid, you would see a lot less gaps and need for intervention in 3rd grade and up.

Violets2 09-21-2019 04:42 AM

Has developmental appropriate curriculum left the educational building??

Maybe it's just me but boy it's getting hard to hold tight when Common Core is still the focus and seems so unreachable to many. Not that they can't reach those goals but I'm finding it hard to keep being expected to reteach/reteach when some students just need more time and growth.

I better stop here before I go off too much!




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