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Tawaki's Message:

This is all the person at the counter/door greeter can ask...

Per ADA law (quote from a trade restaurant site)

"When a service animal comes into your establishment, it’s acceptable to inquire whether the animal is indeed a necessary service animal if it is not plainly marked and what the specific function the service animal performs. That’s it. Your staff cannot judge whether or not the animal is necessary, nor can they ask the customer to furnish documentation, perform the task or inquire about the customer’s disability. Certification paperwork is not required and there’s a cottage industry of websites, which charge money for unneeded paper certifications."

Also state and municipal laws can supersede ADA, meaning there may be even greater leeway who gets in.

For my state, there is no license/governing body who tracks service/psychiatric and emotional support animals. There is no requirement that the animal have a vest on or anything distinguishing it from a pet. The only thing my state has is a voluntary registration for service animals.

So what does it all mean? Short of an animal acting bat crap crazy (which you ask it and the owner to leave), all you can do (in my state) is ask the above questions, hoping the person isn't a con.

Cons know the law. They buy certificates and vests online. There is no national guide lines for training. I have anxiety. *When I get a panic attack, my small dog applies pressure to my upper chest. Legally, that's all the business can ask. It's not up to the business to judge how therapeutic the action is. The cons raise hell if you ask for doctor's note and threaten to sue. As a business, do I want to roll the dice that a small dog sitting quietly under a chair isn't a service/psychiatric support animal? The legal fees you will eat you alive.

* example of what would be ADA okay for a psychiatric service animal. Whether it's true of not, who knows?

My brother dealt with this all the time at his big box store. He'd ask the employees to alert him, and he'd ask the two questions. Some people were honest and left. If the animal was not a PITA, he'd let them go if the owner said yes it's a service animal, and it's trained in some capacity to help. Our state law is garbage. He wasn't (being a peon) willing to get the company tied up into an ADA law suit.

Remember my state makes no requirements on animal having a vest/paperwork/nothing. Who's gonna risk their job making the wrong call?

Hence dogs/animals everywhere.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Charlotte 06-11-2019 11:42 AM

I love dogs and cats. I truly do. But pets do not belong in public places unless it is a service animal or in a store designed specifically for pets. I've seen them in the grocery store, craft stores (I don't want to buy yarn or fabric that a dog has brushed up against), Walgreens (with a carpeted floor), hardware stores, and sneaked into hotel rooms. I have severe allergies to animals. I don't sneeze and get watery eyes -- I have great trouble breathing. I doubt that these dogs enjoy shopping. People who bring their dogs into these places are infringing on my right to keep breathing.

There is no such thing as completely hypoallergenic dogs.

Can you tell this is a sore spot with me?

chipmunky 06-11-2019 10:21 AM

I always thought it was illegal to have animals in any establishment that served or sold food. Is that not true any more?

I remember reading where they made some small family run stores get rid of the cats that lived in the stores. The cats were friendly and kept the store from being invaded by mice and rats. Both owners and customers were not happy about this.

Tawaki 06-11-2019 09:24 AM

This is all the person at the counter/door greeter can ask...

Per ADA law (quote from a trade restaurant site)

"When a service animal comes into your establishment, it’s acceptable to inquire whether the animal is indeed a necessary service animal if it is not plainly marked and what the specific function the service animal performs. That’s it. Your staff cannot judge whether or not the animal is necessary, nor can they ask the customer to furnish documentation, perform the task or inquire about the customer’s disability. Certification paperwork is not required and there’s a cottage industry of websites, which charge money for unneeded paper certifications."

Also state and municipal laws can supersede ADA, meaning there may be even greater leeway who gets in.

For my state, there is no license/governing body who tracks service/psychiatric and emotional support animals. There is no requirement that the animal have a vest on or anything distinguishing it from a pet. The only thing my state has is a voluntary registration for service animals.

So what does it all mean? Short of an animal acting bat crap crazy (which you ask it and the owner to leave), all you can do (in my state) is ask the above questions, hoping the person isn't a con.

Cons know the law. They buy certificates and vests online. There is no national guide lines for training. I have anxiety. *When I get a panic attack, my small dog applies pressure to my upper chest. Legally, that's all the business can ask. It's not up to the business to judge how therapeutic the action is. The cons raise hell if you ask for doctor's note and threaten to sue. As a business, do I want to roll the dice that a small dog sitting quietly under a chair isn't a service/psychiatric support animal? The legal fees you will eat you alive.

* example of what would be ADA okay for a psychiatric service animal. Whether it's true of not, who knows?

My brother dealt with this all the time at his big box store. He'd ask the employees to alert him, and he'd ask the two questions. Some people were honest and left. If the animal was not a PITA, he'd let them go if the owner said yes it's a service animal, and it's trained in some capacity to help. Our state law is garbage. He wasn't (being a peon) willing to get the company tied up into an ADA law suit.

Remember my state makes no requirements on animal having a vest/paperwork/nothing. Who's gonna risk their job making the wrong call?

Hence dogs/animals everywhere.

SeaGlass 06-11-2019 08:15 AM

Dogs do NOT belong in restaurants or stores. I listened to a lady once tell the store manager she had anxiety so she had to have her dog(who was dressed to the nines) with her. The manager required her to show him a doctor's note. She of course didn't have one so he asked her to leave.

I was in a chain restaurant once and a lady brought a little dog in to eat IN a stroller!!! The manager removed them.

Haley23 06-10-2019 11:17 PM

I used to live in a mountain town where dogs were EVERYWHERE. Stores, restaurants, bars, you name it. And not just on patios either. I honestly can't think of a single business I didn't see a dog in. And on work days, teachers would bring their dogs to school. I'm not a dog person and it drove me crazy. I don't like when they bark and jump in your face or try to lick (), and it drives me crazy when the owner says, "Oh, he's just friendly" rather than telling the dog to back off.

I see them a lot less in my current city location. There are a few bars that are dog friendly, but it's well advertised and they're out on patios. And around here, most people at least put them on a leash.

MKat 06-10-2019 10:35 PM

In general, I agree that dogs don't belong inside public buildings and that it is ALWAYS the pet owners responsibility to clean up outdoors.

That said, I once took my dog into a rest stop bathroom because it was over 100 degrees outside and I couldn't leave her in the car for even a minute or two. I held her, she was leashed, and I apologized to the other people. I can go through a drive through for food, but the bathroom is a necessity. (Trust me, I didn't WANT her in there!) Thankfully everyone was nice and told me I did the right thing.

We also took her into a car dealership waiting room while our car was being worked on during a snowstorm once. Sometimes there is literally no choice. I kept her leashed and away from other customers. Traveling with a dog is challenging at times, especially when traveling alone, but worth it for the joy she brings my elderly parents when I take her with me to visit them.

I don't want to see other people's dogs in public rooms, but I am understanding of emergencies if the pet owners are polite.

We do at rare times frequent dog friendly places when we can if we're traveling with her but that's different because she has permission. Interesting to know dollar stores might be a possibility if I'm traveling alone with her and have to make a stop.

At home, my dog stays home.

seenthelight 06-10-2019 10:00 PM

https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/6109...kip=1560232313

Hereís a list of just some of them. I think it clarifies what I was saying about signage. None of these stores to my knowledge have signs on the door saying they are pet friendly, but they are. I also know of a town in my state where all restaurants are dog friendly as long as they have a patio. With the lost being so long and growing longer, unless there is a sign specifically restricting pets, a lot of people just assume they are pet friendly.

Iím not saying itís right, but I am saying people arenít necessarily being malicious or entitled, and given the heat where I live at the moment, if my dogs are with me and I need to grab something real quick, Iím choosing the pet friendly store over the not pet friendly store. I again cite the dollar store example. Taking them my dog home and coming back would have been 40 minutes. (20 to drop him off and 20 to get back to the store) round trip for the 3 items I had forgotten. There are a ton of stores in that shopping center, and believe it or not I didnít choose the dollar store because itís cheap. I chose it because theyíre dog friendly and leaving him in the car for even the time it would take me to get those three items was not on option while under an excessive heat warning.

GraceKrispy 06-10-2019 08:53 PM

I had no idea dogs were allowed in so many stores. I don't like pets in stores (except pet stores). Too often they aren't well-trained or their owners seem to think everyone should love their pets as much as they do. I agree that I would appreciate signs telling me that pets are allowed (or not). I'm not allergic, but I have been surprised by an extremely large dog before as I rounded a corner in a store. It would have been nice to know I might run across a pet.

I love my dog, but she stays home unless it's a trip to Petco.

hand 06-10-2019 08:00 PM

Love dogs. Always had dogs until about five years ago when our last dog passed away. I love dog sitting for my sonís dogs. But Iím on the side of no dogs in stores unless they are service animals. Iíve seen dogs have accidents in stores. Iíve seen dogs barking and growling at each other. As with anything, there are good owners with trained dogs and those who canít control their dogs. Plus Iím not sure why owners need to impose their animals on children or adults who may be allergic or have a fear of dogs.

wildflowerz 06-10-2019 07:44 PM

Our dogs go wherever dogs are allowed to go. Any pet friendly restaurant we have gone to only allows the dogs in their outdoor sitting area. They sit in a cart if we go into Lowe’s, we put a mat down first.

We adopted a 13 yr old dog in Dec. She has had a tough life and is anxious when left alone. She has a stroller and wears dresses in public to hide the scabs on her back. I’m sure people think I’m crazy but I don’t care.

happygal 06-10-2019 07:36 PM

I hadn't thought of that!

Yes, it is a craze because our world is perceived as crazy i guess.

jov 06-10-2019 07:04 PM

I am severely allergic to rabbits. If I crossed paths with that woman in the store, I would likely have had an asthma attack requiring a 911 call and a trip to the ER. My rescue inhaler only works for a few minutes.

Also the self-prescribed emotional support animals craze is really starting to bother me!

Sam5 06-10-2019 06:42 PM

If dogs are allowed, we bring our dog. She is hypoallergenic, 4 lbs, and stays in her carrier bag. If dogs are not allowed or we don't know if they are, she stays home. She is not a service dog, so we do not take her in anywhere that just allows service dogs.

Lots of more places allow dogs than most people realize. For example, I don't know about Home Depot, but Lowe's does.

pdxteacher 06-10-2019 05:58 PM

Well, I'm one of those people who takes my dog to pet-friendly stores, including Home Depot, a local craft store, etc. Portland is pretty dog-friendly in general, and I always call ahead to make sure it's allowed. I think more signage, though, is probably a good idea. I won't ever, ever take my dog to a restaurant or a grocery store, because I am just as grossed out by that as everyone else is.

Sbkangas5 06-10-2019 05:27 PM

I'm finally starting to see more signs saying that only service animals are allowed. I think bringing pets into stores went way overboard for a while, and hopefully it is letting up a bit. I love animals but don't think they belong in stores.


Last year I saw a woman literally walk out of a store after her dog had pooped in the middle of the floor. It was appalling.

happygal 06-10-2019 05:18 PM

Today a lady was holding a rabbit real close to her face in the grocery store.

I am irritated that she felt it was ok, and Im irritated that the store didn't care. Ew gross

seenthelight 06-10-2019 04:59 PM

I agree that they should only be in places that allow them, however, I feel that there needs to be better signage. A lot of places, including Home Depot and Barnes and Noble, are pet friendly now a days, but have no signs up saying they are, so not seeing a sign doesnít alert a pet owner to the fact that they arenít allowed. People assume itís just like Home Depot and thereís just no sign. Iíll also admit to having taken my dog into a store. He had training at PetSmart and the dollar store was right next door. Both are a twenty minute drive from home, so when I realized I needed a couple of things for a science experiment I ran in with him. It gets too hot down here to leave them in the car for even 5 minutes.

There was just a post on here about someone who had there kitten confiscated by the shelter because they found themselves in a similar situation and had to leave the kitten with someone outside the store because it wasnít pet friendly.

Also, I have to comment on the post regarding service dogs. They have no more nor less germs than pet dogs just better training.

*Please excuse all the typos. My phone keyboard is not exactly cooperating.

GreyhoundGirl 06-10-2019 04:05 PM

I love my dogs, but I donít take them into stores unless theyíre pet stores. I have no problem brining then into PetCo, PetSmart or dog boutiques. Thereís a pet shop in town Iím not allowed in unless the dogs are with me (she gets a ton of likes when she posts pictures of them and I always share).

But, Iím aware of allergies and I know not everyone likes dogs so Iím respectful of that and donít bring them into places like Home Depot and the likes.

LazyLake 06-10-2019 03:58 PM

We keep out pets at home, but don't have a problem seeing others with their pets out and about.... as long as the pet seems relaxed in the mist of others. I feel sorry for the pet if it seems stressed.

juliet4 06-10-2019 03:16 PM

Since when did pets become eligible to enter grocery stores, restaurants, and other stores. There has been a backlash at the pets on planes and most severely limit the number on any flight. Pets are for home. Tired of finding piles of you know what on the beaches near me as well. As for the allergies, these folks bringing their pets everywhere are not thinking of anyone but themselves.

twin2 06-10-2019 03:08 PM

I see more and more dogs in stores too. The most recent was at a Home Depot. The worst was a little lap dog in a restaurant. It slept on it's owners lap and it was when she got up to leave I realized it was there. I love dogs but I just couldn't believe a probable non-service dog was brought into a restaurant. I wouldn't mind seeing a seeing eye dog on the floor. They are well trained, and away from the table on the floor. A pet might not be well trained and can share a lot of germs that a service dog would not. Plus pets may attack a other person because they haven't been trained to be around a lot of people in different circumstances... So yeah a real problem for me.

chipmunky 06-10-2019 02:41 PM

and I have a friend who has severe allergies to animals, dogs and cats. She actually can't even come into my home or anyone's home if they have a pet.
She would have a serious medical issue if she entered a store where someone decided to bring in their pet.

If a store welcomes animals they should have a sign to warn others. A local book store has 2 cats living there. There is a sign as well as almost always having one of the cats sleeping right in the front window.

Gigi814 06-10-2019 02:30 PM

Lately I have been noticing how many people go into a store with their dog. My local Walmart has a sign on their door reminding customers that pets are not allowed in the store. I was there today and saw two different women with their dogs. One was on a leash and the other was in a wagon. Neither of them were service animals. I always fear that someone will step in fecal matter or slip in a puddle of urine. Has anyone else noticed this?




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