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looks_inside's Message:

I have an extensive collection of methodical lessons plans from student teaching, but this being my first year of having my own classroom, I don't have one single lesson plan typed out the way I did in undergrad.

Has this happened to any of you first year teachers? I'm just swamped with so much other stuff, step by step lesson plans just don't make the cut right now.

I'm having a blast this year so far and I do archive my ideas but, yeah full lessons plans, not so much.

I would love to hear from new teachers about this element. Thanks!

looks_inside

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
twin2 08-18-2018 03:56 AM

The school system I have worked for requires detailed lesson plans. Those plans used to and I assume still are required to be submitted one week in advance.

looks_inside 04-10-2018 10:28 AM

Thank you. I appreciate the comments!

looks_inside 04-10-2018 10:21 AM

As of now I'm finding that streamlining is working. And I totally agree about creating a basic template to work off of.

I've noticed there are so many variables in the classroom that would make it super challenging sticking to a step by step overly detailed lesson plan. I feel much more flexible when I have a few solid steps which can be built on as we move through a topic.

Thanks for your response!

Lottalove 04-07-2018 12:58 PM

But it really depends on the school. Some schools require more than others, some Principals require more than others...

However, I have a hard time believing that anyone anywhere will require them like we did in College.

In College, they were more theoretical. We had to make them up from scratch in most cases. We had to provide all the manipulatives and extra supporting materials. They were out of context as well. So the set up, introduction, etc was new each time...

In an actual classroom setting, we don't generally start from scratch--we already have a schedule in place, a set of manipulatives that have been in place all year, a curriculum guide and even textbooks or a trusted resource/system. We have videos, games, and experiments online for introductory or supplementary materials.

Song of Joy 04-07-2018 07:38 AM

I've learned how to streamline and how to create a basic template for a subject area.

For example, in math, I look for the focus of the lesson. Then I find a hands-on introduction using manipulatives, a read aloud math book or maybe a game that reinforces that focus. After that we work a few minutes on fact fluency, and then I teach a mini-lesson, followed by an assignment which involves me circulating and giving help to small groups or individuals. Sometimes I change it up to buddy work or something else, but this is my fall back. My lesson plans for a day take up 4 pages, 2 for the morning an 2 for the afternoon.

And no, very people have the time to write up lesson plans like colleges require during undergrad work for every subject every day.

Seriously, I can't imagine anyone who has taught for more than 3 or 4 years even attempting to write lesson plans of that detail.

MrsFrazzled 04-07-2018 06:37 AM

This is common practice for the county system I am in. This is my third year teaching high school and my lesson plans are the most basic things ever. No one told me when I got hired how to write my lesson plans or what all needs to be in them.

I found lesson plans for a previous teacher that worked in my classroom and I based mine off of those. I interned in a different school in this system and one of those teachers told me she didnít do lesson plans. And she didnít. She never wrote or typed them up. She did not submit any in INOW. I was appalled. (She was retiring that year, but she had been doing that for years.)

Lesson plans in college are nothing like what you have to do for a real job. I just think itís because no one wants to have to read through all that stuff. Iím pretty sure my professors in college never did.

looks_inside 04-03-2018 08:19 AM

I have an extensive collection of methodical lessons plans from student teaching, but this being my first year of having my own classroom, I don't have one single lesson plan typed out the way I did in undergrad.

Has this happened to any of you first year teachers? I'm just swamped with so much other stuff, step by step lesson plans just don't make the cut right now.

I'm having a blast this year so far and I do archive my ideas but, yeah full lessons plans, not so much.

I would love to hear from new teachers about this element. Thanks!

looks_inside




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