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Lottalove's Message:

I have seen some folks post on FB groups that they have that in their districts.

I have taught some students NOT on my caseload, as do my colleagues. We assign caseloads and then put the kids in the classes where they need to be. I think it is easier to serve the kids on my caseload as I developed the majority of the IEP and do the testing/data collection.

I think it depends on the level of support rather than the titles.

I worked in a smaller district with a school psych. The school psych and her secretary scheduled all the meetings, invited the appropriate people, handled cancelations, and reserved the right conference rooms. That district also had a Transition person for all students over 14 and a compliance officer who went over every IEP with the standards in hand to make sure all the boxes were checked and it had no errors in any way.

All I had to do was fill in my parts of the IEP (PLEP, my goals, acc/mods) and lead the meeting. Afterwards, the psych and her office finalized everything, made the copies, handed them out, got the receipts and finalized those dates in the computer.

Another district had a diagnostician who handled all the testing and most of the eval/re-eval paperwork.

It is usually super nice to have the extra help. I don't mind being case manager right now as my caseload is the smallest it has ever been.

I mainly hate setting the meetings and trying to get everyone's schedule to coordinate.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
readandweep 01-25-2021 09:42 AM

We have case managers here.

My current district the case managers run the IEP meetings and collect and submit paperwork and meeting notes. They are supposed to determine case loads and schedule paras at my middle school, but that does not happen at my school.

Teachers schedule meetings and write plop and goals. I think our case manager is supposed to do the scheduling but again teachers do. God bless Google docs.

The qualifications for the position are 5 years of special ed teaching/related services and a masters. It usually goes to someone who has 15 plus years teaching and wants/needs to leave the classroom.

They get an additional 10 percent of their salary as a stipend. Some get extra pay to be curriculum and testing supervisors.

My current case manager was seriously injured by a student and was transitioned to her role.

My previous district also had case managers, but in addition to the above qualifications they were required to have administration credentials and they did all special Ed staff evaluations. They were on the administration salary scale.

A good case manager does make the job easier, but a bad one can make it harder, especially if you are new to the building or district.

GreyhoundGirl 01-22-2021 06:47 PM

Iím doing it right now. I was hired as the virtual teacher and the case manager is someone else. HOWEVER, Iím responsible for collecting data, attending conferences, IEP meetings, contacting parents, talking to parents and filling out most of the IEP so Iíll be dipped if I can figure how Iím not the case manager.

I see 10 groups a day, plan for 6 classes and have 30+ kids.

The planning and data collecting is brutal.

Haley23 01-22-2021 07:58 AM

I have heard of these magical places where "case manager" is an entirely separate job, and even heard that sometimes these people get paid MORE than teachers, just to case manage?? Or only certain sped teachers have to case manage, and they get an extra stipend for this? Not in my state. Sped teachers are case managers and in charge of everything, and we don't get any extra pay.

We also don't have diagnosticians and sped teachers do the bulk of formal evaluations- all of the formal academic testing, parent/student input, observations, MTSS data, informal academic data, etc. OT/SLP do their own testing and add in their information to the eval report/IEP if warranted. Psych does cognitive, but my district has gone towards only wanting to do cognitive if we actually suspect a cognitive disability, so they rarely have to do it. Psych does social/emotional if warranted.

This year everything is messed up because of Covid, of course. Our second sped teacher got pulled to teach in the e-learning school, leaving me with 45 kids in K-6. Thankfully my P is amazing and really worked on making it the best situation possible. I'm only actually teaching/providing services in one cohort, while interventionists are providing the academic services in other cohorts (ESSA allows this). I am case managing the entire school and doing all of the testing. That part is still more work, but at least I'm not figuring out how to teach 45 kids in 7 grade levels on top of it.

This year one of the other buildings hired a sped teacher coming from another state. She LOST HER MIND over having to case manage in addition to teaching. She actually kept emailing our sped director asking when she'd be hiring case managers/was constantly complaining to the rest of the team. Of course no one had any sympathy because around here no one has heard of case managers being separate (I only know that's "a thing" from reading here). She ended up quitting like 2 months in .

Lottalove 01-22-2021 06:00 AM

I have seen some folks post on FB groups that they have that in their districts.

I have taught some students NOT on my caseload, as do my colleagues. We assign caseloads and then put the kids in the classes where they need to be. I think it is easier to serve the kids on my caseload as I developed the majority of the IEP and do the testing/data collection.

I think it depends on the level of support rather than the titles.

I worked in a smaller district with a school psych. The school psych and her secretary scheduled all the meetings, invited the appropriate people, handled cancelations, and reserved the right conference rooms. That district also had a Transition person for all students over 14 and a compliance officer who went over every IEP with the standards in hand to make sure all the boxes were checked and it had no errors in any way.

All I had to do was fill in my parts of the IEP (PLEP, my goals, acc/mods) and lead the meeting. Afterwards, the psych and her office finalized everything, made the copies, handed them out, got the receipts and finalized those dates in the computer.

Another district had a diagnostician who handled all the testing and most of the eval/re-eval paperwork.

It is usually super nice to have the extra help. I don't mind being case manager right now as my caseload is the smallest it has ever been.

I mainly hate setting the meetings and trying to get everyone's schedule to coordinate.

mathela 01-21-2021 05:08 PM

Does anyone know of any districts where the special ed teacher is not the case manager?




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