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twin2's Message:

I am having a little difficulty understanding my role. I want to go to our Title I Resource Teacher for clarification, but I want to hear from other Title I Tutors first. I have never seen anything in writing giving a job description. The job was offered when I was rejected for a different position.

I work with groups for differentiated instruction for reading, and for math flex groups. That's the easy part. I am also being sent into a classroom to "provide support". The teacher I "provide support" for has me monitor behavior while she meets with her groups. The kids are supposed to be doing SSR or doing independent work when they are not meeting with the teacher. Instead, many of them are up and about, talking, going to the bathroom, going back and forth to their locker in the hall, or going to the bathroom. Some students even do their math homework during this time. Somehow I feel like "providing support" might mean something else. Regardless I can't bring this kids under control. They look at me and continue do what they want. I don't have any consequences for them. They don't know me, so they certainly don't want to please me.

What are your duties as a Title I Tutor? How much input do you have into instruction for the students you work with-- does the teacher come up with the intervention activity or is that your job?

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
cabernet 10-20-2018 07:20 PM

My point of view...
As a Title I teacher you are there for support of the students who are struggling in the subject area in which you are involved. That should mean you take a small group or two or work with individual students, Not monitor behaviors. That's on the teacher for not setting up an appropriate system when group work is done.

I would suggest you clarify your role with your supervisor and then sit down with the teacher and create a schedule of which students you should work with and on which days.

ConnieWI 10-20-2018 05:35 PM

I work as an interventionist. My responsibilities include working with tier two reading students, and tier two and three math students.

I also have thirty minutes each day in first grade classrooms. When there, the teacher lets me know who to work with and what to do. This might involve a small group of students who need direction with a writing assignment, or using RAZ KIDS and an i-pad with two students. On other days, this might involve reading with a single child, or teaching a guided reading group. It just depends on the teacher and what needs doing.

Perhaps you should bring together the large group and make an SSR poster. In the first column, "What does SSR look like?" In the second column, "What does SSR not look like?" Then I would put small post-it notes on desktops and make smiley faces on the notes where students are following "What does SSR look like?" during free reading time.

Another thing you might try is pulling up a chair and having the biggest offender read to you for five minutes. Before moving to another child, I would tell the first reader that tomorrow you are going to ask him/her three questions about what he/she read after you moved on to the second child. I would then move to the next biggest offender, and follow the same procedure. Make this an opportunity for students to get extra attention.

You might even want to pull together several students and quietly read-aloud to them in another corner of the room. Let the other students know that they will get the same opportunity if they are using SSR time wisely. You could make a simple comprehension game on the book you read aloud so the students could play it after you've finished reading the book.

I am of the opinion that this teacher has some students with small attention spans or no idea what SSR should look like. In order for the teacher to work with a small group, her other students need direction. We all know that even the best teacher cannot work with small groups if the rest of the group is off-task.

Of course...before using any of my suggestions, I would speak with the classroom teacher and get permission. After all, this is her classroom.

twin2 10-18-2018 03:42 PM

I am having a little difficulty understanding my role. I want to go to our Title I Resource Teacher for clarification, but I want to hear from other Title I Tutors first. I have never seen anything in writing giving a job description. The job was offered when I was rejected for a different position.

I work with groups for differentiated instruction for reading, and for math flex groups. That's the easy part. I am also being sent into a classroom to "provide support". The teacher I "provide support" for has me monitor behavior while she meets with her groups. The kids are supposed to be doing SSR or doing independent work when they are not meeting with the teacher. Instead, many of them are up and about, talking, going to the bathroom, going back and forth to their locker in the hall, or going to the bathroom. Some students even do their math homework during this time. Somehow I feel like "providing support" might mean something else. Regardless I can't bring this kids under control. They look at me and continue do what they want. I don't have any consequences for them. They don't know me, so they certainly don't want to please me.

What are your duties as a Title I Tutor? How much input do you have into instruction for the students you work with-- does the teacher come up with the intervention activity or is that your job?




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