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Risa's Message:

I tried the sticky notes, but it got to be too cumbersome. I think it was in an AVID training where i heard about two and three-column notes. Years prior, I had originally used two-column notes as a 'double entry journal'.

The left column was where they copied/quoted the text (and page number) with any of the following: a passage, interesting language, a problem or a conflict, quotations, a key event, a critical fact, or a main idea. It was basically anything they wanted to respond to when they were 'free reading'. Of course, they didn't do this all at once. During specific guided instruction they wrote about whatever the focus was.

The right column was where they wrote their thoughts about the text with a reaction, a theory, a comparison, an explanation, its significance, observations or connections to self or the text.

I'm posting a page I gave to my colleagues (or at workshops) when they'd ask about it.

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Teacherbee_4 07-11-2020 03:59 PM

Thanks! I've done double entry journals before, so maybe I'll do something like that!

MightyTeach 07-10-2020 03:32 PM

I tried using post it notes numerous times and gave up! I really like Risa’s idea of using columns. I think I’ll create a similar t-chart.

Risa 07-10-2020 10:39 AM

I tried the sticky notes, but it got to be too cumbersome. I think it was in an AVID training where i heard about two and three-column notes. Years prior, I had originally used two-column notes as a 'double entry journal'.

The left column was where they copied/quoted the text (and page number) with any of the following: a passage, interesting language, a problem or a conflict, quotations, a key event, a critical fact, or a main idea. It was basically anything they wanted to respond to when they were 'free reading'. Of course, they didn't do this all at once. During specific guided instruction they wrote about whatever the focus was.

The right column was where they wrote their thoughts about the text with a reaction, a theory, a comparison, an explanation, its significance, observations or connections to self or the text.

I'm posting a page I gave to my colleagues (or at workshops) when they'd ask about it.

Keltikmom 07-10-2020 10:14 AM

They only truly work if it’s done by choice. I found if I mandated X number of post it’s with X strategies used, it sucked the joy out of reading.

It’s way better to call them together at the session’s end and share what they did.

Teacherbee_4 07-10-2020 09:37 AM

In the past, during independent reading, I had the students jot down their thinking, strategy use, etc. while reading. Often, whatever the teaching point was for the day in our mini-lesson, I had them have at least 1 sticky note that showed how they used in their book/independent book. Does anyone else have their kids do this? I'm starting to have second thoughts because I've tried to do it in the past with my books (using kid chapter books), and I found it to be in a PITA. Thoughts?




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