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Msdee123's Message:

Hey everyone! I'm a student teacher/teachers aide in a kindergarten class but my job specifically is to take care of a child who is extremely hyperactive and has ADHD. His mother refuses to give him medication. He throws himself on the floor constantly, runs around the class expecting you to chase him, breaks things around the classroom, and gets on the computer or hides under the desk. Now, yesterday was my first day, but I want to accept this challenge and try to get through to him, I've tried tally marks and I have other ideas to try.... I know he can be a good kid, he just can't help it sometimes but I need advice to get him to sit still at moments and do his work and actually learn! He is now my 100 percent responsibility since the teacher is trying to teach all her other students who are not special needs. (They won't move him to another class) any ideas of positive reinforcements?! I will appreciate ANYTHING!

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Discussion Review (newest messages first)
Mammabear4 05-29-2016 04:35 AM

I think the ideas above are awesome and on point.

Establish relationship with pairing. (Start small!)
Don't talk too much.
Give attention to peers who are ON TASK and showing good behavior.
Kids with ADHD respond well to visual schedules.

You've got a mover, so I would add more scheduled breaks.
Carry a heavy basket to office or designated spot.

Ask gen ed teacher what works is an EXCELLENT idea. Is there an area of the room where your child would calm down?
coping strategies that work are teaching child to breath.
allowing child to work on belly with a clipboard, rather than sitting with a group of peers who react to silliness.

Sorry this is a bit rambling. I am in a hurry! GOOD LUCK

Betty4567 02-15-2016 06:16 PM

STEP 1: Document. Keep a daily chart and just document all the times he gets up, runs around etc.. (At this point, you need a baseline. Don't worry, about trying to change behavior. Stay neutral and don't play into his games of chasing him around.)

Send documentation home and hound the mother if it does not come back daily. Send her copies of the daily reports on Fridays.

Step 2: Have the mother come and observe after about a week of daily reports. Then, educate the mother. Set up a meeting with the school counselor and have her go over the pro's and con's of medication. This is a very delicate subject so I let the counselor handle parents.

Step 3: If she is still not budging. I set up a meeting with the parent and the Principal. My p. will let her know that he is not protected under Special Ed. Laws. He can be retained in First and does not qualify for accommodations. That means that he will NOT get 1:1 support in First grade.

If none of that works, then you try various modifications until you find what works!

good luck!!

Opal 02-15-2016 05:03 PM

A rocking chair during group activities such as storytime works well...

SpeedLimit62 02-15-2016 11:25 AM

Does he have an IEP - I would think he does, considering the fact that he has a full time 1:1. You need to speak with his SPED teacher and find out what they have been doing in the past to help him. We are half way through the school year (at least) somethings have to have been tried in the past. You can start from there, did they work... if not, how can you adjust things to help him?

How about token economies? Frequent brain breaks or activity breaks? Putting him on a specific schedule.. use velcro and have him pull off/on the activity that's completed for the schedule.

spedder1 02-15-2016 07:24 AM

"Now, yesterday was my first day" really jumped out at me. The child is in kindergarten. He has ADHD. Did you ask the teacher what strategies have been used in the past? Was there a different aide in the room before you who was responsible for the child? Was the child that out of control before you were hired? He could be merely responding to a new person trying to impose new things on him. What we do in the autism room I am subbing in is to use a reward system. There is a picture of the reward on a piece of laminated paper. There are 5 pieces of velcro lined up horizontally under that picture. Every minute the student is on task, she gets another picture of her preferred reward (a dry erase board and marker). After she gets 5 pictures, she gets the reward. A timer is set for 2 minutes. After the time goes off the item is removed and we start over. We are slowly lengthening the time between getting pictures of the object. This student is able to stay in her seat for 10 minutes at a time now. She is returning to her seat with few problems when given a verbal reminder, "Desk". One thing we never do is remove a picture if she has difficulty sitting. It just takes her longer to receive the reward. As a previous poster stated, giving more opportunities for movement can backfire. I have used a jumpoline for students who need movement breaks, but there is always a timer and an expectation that the child will return to his/her work area. Other things we are doing in the autism room are allowing the child to stand to work. We also have wobble seats for students who need to move while sitting. If the child is behind academically there are things the teacher can do. She can refer to the special ed team for an evaluation. If the child does have an ADHD diagnosis, he can, if determined to be eligible, get IEP services under Other Health Impaired. At that point the OT can become involved to provide therapy and give assistance to the classroom staff.
Kathy

leslier 02-15-2016 06:51 AM

This child sounds so much like one that I have observed in a K class recently. There are no easy answers. I am in on inclusion, but this child does not have an IEP. Here are a few ideas that might help. I have found that some children like this only get more hyped up if you give them more running around. I have literally seen them bounce off the walls if you give them the running room. Try instead teaching them to be in control of his own body. Try putting tape on the floor about 4 ft. square and tell them this is their space during instructional time. It should be on the floor where at least he can see/hear the instruction. Within the square, give him Lego blocks, or his own journal book with crayons to draw. He must be in his space to earn rewards. Putting a small chair within the box is an option for when he decides to sit. It has taken a long time, but with consistency, I am seeing some improvement. At least he is staying in his spot.

As for the mother, I would work with the teacher and those above you to meet with the parents and keep them involved. This effort can not be all on the school. A point sheet should be sent home daily reporting on how the day went. Parent must commit to signing and returning it daily. If it's a good report, child receives a reward at home as well.Speak to your school psychologist for a checklist. This will also give you data for later.I have found great success in getting the parent to participate in Shared- Responsibility. The parent needs to come in to school and sit in the classroom and help with behavioral compliance, especially during times when the teacher needs the most support. A few sessions of that will help convince the parent to take the child to the pediatrician for a "check-up". Hang in there and good luck. Eventually maturity will help!

teachingtall 02-14-2016 05:07 PM

Are you going for certification as a teacher and this is your classroom to learn how to be a teacher?

First things first, how is the students academics? What are is academic needs? Is he just a behavior issue or is academics an issue?

Second, it sounds like he needs to move. So get him some way to move. Break up his work periods with movement breaks, it could be as simple as giving tasks around the classroom (go get the markers, go get the glue) to starting at one minute of work time, to 5 minutes of movement time.

What about class movement breaks, get the entire class doing jumping jacks or gonoodle dances, they are 5-6 y/o kinders, they can't sit and get for hours like an older kiddo.

Is this child on an IEP? If not is in the referral process?

Munchkins 02-13-2016 07:58 PM

If he can't sit still, he needs other options. Maybe he can stand at a desk, or kneel and use a chair seat for a work surface. He should have more than one seat and be able to move between the two as needed. But he should not be allowed to be disruptive and run around the room. Find out what motivates him and make him earn it. Use a timer. If he is on task for 5 minutes, let him earn points to have a reward (like coloring, playing with match box cars, whatever) for 5 minutes once he earns 6 points. Running around loses a point. I've used pompoms in a plastic container so the progress is very concrete. Gradually increase the time needed to earn point. The trick will be seeing what he will work for. Good luck!

ArtsyFartsyII 02-13-2016 06:24 PM

I don't have too many suggestions, but I do know a kid who was so severe, I told his mom I could not handle babysitting him at my house. (this was not a school situation). He was never put on meds, but he did settle down some by age 9. She had to pull him out of public school and homeschool him. Frequent breaks to run around on the playground might help. If he really can't help it, I question that using bribes or consequences is going to help anything.

Msdee123 02-13-2016 09:32 AM

Hey everyone! I'm a student teacher/teachers aide in a kindergarten class but my job specifically is to take care of a child who is extremely hyperactive and has ADHD. His mother refuses to give him medication. He throws himself on the floor constantly, runs around the class expecting you to chase him, breaks things around the classroom, and gets on the computer or hides under the desk. Now, yesterday was my first day, but I want to accept this challenge and try to get through to him, I've tried tally marks and I have other ideas to try.... I know he can be a good kid, he just can't help it sometimes but I need advice to get him to sit still at moments and do his work and actually learn! He is now my 100 percent responsibility since the teacher is trying to teach all her other students who are not special needs. (They won't move him to another class) any ideas of positive reinforcements?! I will appreciate ANYTHING!




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