ProTeacher Community - Reply to Topic




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


Post Your Reply!

Gromit's Message:

I loved teaching The Giver and A Wrinkle in Time to sixth graders, and I had a great project for after we read both. They had to create a "utopian civilization." It tied in perfectly to our study of early civilizations because they had to consider what makes a civilization, and after reading these books, they had to really think deeply about what they value most in a society and create laws and systems to emphasize those. We were also able to have great discussions about morality, free will, self-sacrifice, freedom of vs freedom from responsibility, value of pain, value and meaning of love, self-esteem, and more. Because I was at a Christian school, we also discussed predestination vs free will, religion vs relationship, and what it means to be light in the darkness.

I miss teaching those books so much!


Oh, and The Tale of Despereaux. Any reading skill or strategy you can think of can be demonstrated with Despereaux, and it's a beautiful story of courage, forgiveness, love, and honor. It's my all time favorite children's novel.

Members have more posting options! Sign Up Free!
Random Teacher Question
Name:
Type a guest name (or sign up for a free account)
Descriptive Title (Please do type a title):
  
Message:

Additional Options
Not a member? See the great features you're missing
Did you know? ProTeacher is a FREE service

Discussion Review (newest messages first)
jedgar 03-27-2019 05:52 AM

I love the Devil's Arithmetic. My students loved it as well. So many great titles listed here. I have purchased it, but have not read it yet, Fish in a Tree. I plan top start reading in in the next day or two. It is highly rated like Wonder, but more for 6th grade and above according to a group I follow on Facebook.

Heckybecky 05-24-2018 06:13 PM

I was just told that we must move Social studies into literacy class. We are also required to follow the gates maps. Can you give any tips on how to make that work?

Beach Glass 02-18-2018 10:15 PM

Wrinkle in Time (and remember, the movie is coming out. Sure hope it's better than Disney's last attempt at it)

Hoot

I combined Watsons Go to Birmingham with We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March. Watsons is fiction, but 1963 is non-fiction. Such fine books and powerful taught one after another. You can also get a free 35 minute documentary from Teaching Tolerance: "Mighty Times: The Children's March." Very fine piece of work.

Old Yeller - I had the county extension agent in to talk about brands - the history and modern day practices. Also had a vet come in to discuss rabies. Again - the history and how it's handled today.

Summer of the Monkeys

Any book that features empowered youth is something I looked carefully at.

christyin6th 02-18-2018 08:25 PM

My honors students LOVED Freak the Mighty. Every.Single.Oneofthem. We are currently in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. They are really enjoying it, but it is more challenging due to setting and dialect.

MrsRetired 01-10-2018 06:46 PM

but my kids, not so much.
I really liked The House on Hackman"s Hill by Joan Lowry Nixon. Ancient Egypt with a cliff hanger at the end of most chapters.

Red 07-15-2017 04:44 AM

This past year I used Hatchet. Our 6th Grade Social Studies curriculum focues on Ancient History. The students love The Golden Goblet.

WildcatBarb85 07-08-2017 12:16 PM

We do Hoot, Esperanza Rising, and Watsons Go to Birmingham and during the 4th quarter, I do either Crispin (so I can tie in the Middle Ages--I also teach SS) or The Devil's Arithmetic. Last year, we read Freedom Walkers (nonfiction) before during Watsons Go to Birmingham.

Gromit 06-23-2017 05:27 PM

I loved teaching The Giver and A Wrinkle in Time to sixth graders, and I had a great project for after we read both. They had to create a "utopian civilization." It tied in perfectly to our study of early civilizations because they had to consider what makes a civilization, and after reading these books, they had to really think deeply about what they value most in a society and create laws and systems to emphasize those. We were also able to have great discussions about morality, free will, self-sacrifice, freedom of vs freedom from responsibility, value of pain, value and meaning of love, self-esteem, and more. Because I was at a Christian school, we also discussed predestination vs free will, religion vs relationship, and what it means to be light in the darkness.

I miss teaching those books so much!


Oh, and The Tale of Despereaux. Any reading skill or strategy you can think of can be demonstrated with Despereaux, and it's a beautiful story of courage, forgiveness, love, and honor. It's my all time favorite children's novel.

vanvic 06-23-2017 05:04 PM

Hatchet and The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

Shelley007 06-23-2017 09:20 AM

My 6th graders do Wrinkle in Time, The Phantom Tollbooth, The Giver, and Bud, Not Buddy. At our school they read The Cay in 5th grade. I've heard Wonder is awesome also, but they do that in 5th grade at my school too!

GymRatGiGi 05-31-2017 05:31 AM

My students soak in Letters from Rifka. Although the reading level is not listed as 6th grade, the students (even the reluctant readers) are hooked and participate fully with the assignments. I have a rigorous unit developed (pulling from other teachers' creations), and the kids don't complain about the work associated with it.

ZipLine 01-01-2017 06:52 AM

Love those two books as well, Rt2Learn!

Rt2learn 12-31-2016 11:27 AM

I second The Cay. My students love The Giver, Number the Stars, any novel centered around WW II.

ZipLine 12-31-2016 07:05 AM

My favorite all time novel to read/teach with my students was The Cay by Theodore Taylor. The kids loved it! Set during WWII in the Caribbean. Two main characters are an 11 year old American boy and an old Black man from the Caribbean who are stranded on a deserted island after the ship they are in is torpedoed by the Germans. It's a story of survival, friendship, racial prejudice, respect, and age. The kids fall in love with Timothy who is the old man. He's wise and teaches the boy, Phillip, who lost his vision from the explosion, how to survive on the island. Phillip learns to love and respect Timothy, having been raised by a mother who was prejudiced. The story is rich in figurative language, new vocabulary, and filled so many events and topics for discussion. There is an audio tape of the book well worth getting because it helps with the pronunciation of some words and Timothy's character is read in the native dialect, which the kids loved and got very good at doing too. This book made a lasting impact on my kids and is one of my favorite books ever. It definitely meets your wish for a substantial and challenging book, and it's a book your kids won't want to put down.

Miss White19 12-29-2016 10:23 PM

Hello ALL-- I am looking for a classic read that my 6th grade would enjoy! I want the novel to be substantial, challenging, and have a great theme that kids can relate to. Any ideas?




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:23 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net