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-   -   Reading | Literature How do you teach summary? (http://www.proteacher.net/discussions/showthread.php?t=597605)

ineedhelp5 01-21-2018 11:18 AM

How do you teach summary?
 
Hi everyone. I am student teaching and doing my first lesson on summary. I'm a little lost on how to teach it and what tools to use. Any information would be great! Thanks in advance!!!!

freckleface 01-21-2018 05:12 PM

Welcome to PT!
 
First welcome to ProTeacher! You'll be visiting with a whole bunch of great people!

When I teach summary I tell them the 5 finger rule:
Who?
What?
When?
Where?
Why? and in the palm of your hand can be How?

BayAreaSub 01-21-2018 06:31 PM

I think it depends...
 
on the genre of the writing piece that the students will be summarizing. I know I've had to teach

Somebody...
But...
Then...
So...

for fiction selections, but it would be different for a nonfiction selection, and different again for a summary of an editorial or opinion piece.

ConnieWI 01-28-2018 06:15 AM

For Fiction Picture Books
 
I use:

Somebody (who)

Wanted (to do what)

But

Then

So

Finally

For the book Allie and the Everything Sandwich, the summary would look like this:

Allie's mom wanted her to babysit for her little brother, Mack, until the neighbor lady could arrive in one hour. But Mack was an impulsive boy and liked to do dangerous things so Allie knew she would have to keep him busy and safe. Then Mack wanted a fish sandwich for lunch but Allie knew she could not use the stove or oven. So she convinced Mack to have an Everything Sandwich, Everything Punch, and Everything Sundae instead. Finally the neighbor lady arrived just as Mack was vomiting in the kitchen.

Gromit 01-28-2018 09:01 AM

If you google somebody wanted but so then, you’ll find a ton of resources. I also teach the plot diagram and have students identify key info for each element and write 1-2 sentences each. This turns it into a 7-9 sentence paragraph with a logical summary. I find this works better for novels than the somebody wanted method.

For non fiction texts, we look for topic sentences, headers, repeated information, and conclusions to identify the key W’s. The main idea is our topic sentence and then we simplify the support.

cruxian 02-10-2018 04:44 PM

I've used the somebody wanted but so method but usually in the lower grades. I find it lends itself less well with my fifth graders who work with complex texts. By that I mean, I'd have a hard time using that structure to summarize a text like Harry Potter or Bridge to Terabithia.
I approach it usually through having kids reflect upon the characters and the problems they face in the story. They describe the characters, their problems and the resolution of those problems.

Lakeside 02-11-2018 09:36 AM

Summary Strategies
 
Dumb it Down -
I know we can't actually say "dumb it down" in school <!--giggle--> but I ask them to pretend they're telling the story, in just ___ sentences to someone too young to read the whole thing.

A Year from Now -
I ask them what about the story they think they'll remember if next year's teacher asks them whether they read _______? (This helps some kids sort out the important details from the unimportant ones.)

TaffyFL 02-11-2018 10:05 AM

Hashtags
 
We looked at tweets that have short hashtags that are like summaries. Like a tweet linking to an article about a dog who saves their family might have a #herodog.

Then they read each paragraph of a nonfiction article and write a hashtag for it.

Finally, they take their hashtags and make a summary.

It's not perfect, but it's more engaging than some of the stuff they did in second and third grade. And it gets them to determine importance.

Here is an example using fiction text; hope it helps!

Singvogel 07-15-2018 04:31 PM

Most Important Words Strategy
 
With the students, take a multi-paragraph nonfiction text.

1. Cross out all the articles and conjunctions. Reading sentences aloud, comment that you can still understand the sentence without those words.
2. Continue by crossing out adjectives, adverbs, and other words that aren't essential to the core meaning.
3. Gradually, you will get down to a minimum of words that are used to write the summary.
4. Find synonyms to use so that you are also teaching the importance of writing the summary using your own words.


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