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Lillybabe Lillybabe is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 427
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Lillybabe
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 427
Senior Member

Old 10-29-2017, 08:53 AM
 
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My suggestion is going to sound mean but it might work. When you want all students working independently or listening (ie no talking at all) set that as an expectation. Give a reward or consequence if there are any sounds/talking at all. If you expect 100% compliance and one or two kids are always getting others in trouble (or making them lose a reward) everyone is going to start telling you who the troublemakers are. Once you start hearing "But Bobby's the only one talking!" you can start focusing on just that one student. According to many things I have read on classroom management if it's more than 1 or 2 students talking (which you'd notice I think even with your sensory issue) then the whole class is likely off task and you need to have more practice with procedures. With my kindergarten group (I did this with 5th/6th too) when we practice stamina for independent reading and writing I set a timer for a specific time (we're up to 10 minutes now) and the expectation is no one talks or distracts others for the entire time. I shower them with praise and Dojo points if we make the goal and because it's so quiet I can easily pick out the one or two who decide to break the rules. As far as catching who is off task I would just pick an area or section of the room to hone in on at any one time. Look at each child in that area and make eye contact while you're giving directions or watching for independent working. Whoever is able to quickly make eye contact or whose eyes are locked in on what they are doing is on task. Anyone who takes more than a few seconds to notice you or who is looking all about is off task.
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