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Kishkumen Kishkumen is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2017
Posts: 76
Junior Member

Kishkumen
 
Joined: Oct 2017
Posts: 76
Junior Member

Old 11-23-2017, 09:21 AM
 
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Really really watch and the moment you see one kid even whisper when doing your procedure, remove him from the group to stand in the hall or at the back wall. My guess is that you've taught the procedures, you've gone over the expectations, but somewhere along the way you are not enforcing. What do you DO when a kid talks after you've said no talking?
If I could determine who those students are, I could apply a consequence.

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How long have you been teaching? Do you feel you have really connected with your students and built some sort of positive relationship with most of them?
This is my 12th year teaching, and my 3rd year teaching 3rd grade. Prior to this I've taught 2nd grade and k-8 art. I believe I have a positive relation with the students. They love sharing things with me, and they wave as I drive by (a few live in my neighborhood)

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Challenge them to see if they can do their clean-up or their going-home transition more efficiently than they did the day before or the time before. Use expressions like, "That was pretty good. I think we can be great, though.
I've tried that since last year. Win or lose, they don't seem to care enough to change behavior.

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It was body language. It was the way the teacher stood, turned, walked and gestured that signaled to students "I mean business". In the classrooms of the teachers struggling they noted quick, rapid movement, clenched jaw, finger jabbing, arms folded across chest, quarter instead of full turns - all signaling someone upset and losing control.
I've been accused of being "too nice" to students. Other teachers have told me to "show them that you really mean it".

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When these teachers were at the board and noticed disruption they turned partially around to address it. In body language they were telling students this disruption is sort of important but I'd rather be teaching. When the naturals spotted disruption the lesson came to a screeching halt. They turned all the way around with both feet and shoulders squared-up facing the problem(s). Their face was neutral, a sort of bored look (signaling calm). There was no doubt in the room instruction had stopped and the teacher was now in discipline mode. Students read it, "This is serious."
I do the Fred Jones thing (6-second turn, relax and let the student do the work, silent look). When happens when this doesn't work, and the students continue to be disruptive? Worse, what do I do when multiple consequences fail to change a students' behavior? positive recognition, table points, private conversations, lunch detentions, phone calls home, and other things mandated before the admin gets involve have all failed. Admin intervention has also failed.

I believe the problem is that consequence (positive and negative) are not severe enough to change a student's behavior.
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