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Fenwick Fenwick is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2010
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Fenwick
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 358
Full Member

Old 11-27-2017, 11:39 PM
 
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...What I mean by a "reset" is treating the class as if it's beginning school year again, and doing nothing but practice procedures for a week or two. That means getting behind in curriculum. I did this last year returning from Christmas break, but it backfired. We ended up practicing procedures for the rest of the year. The disruptive students remained disruptive, I couldn't tell who they were, students saw that I was unable to stop the disruption and became off-task. That's why it's my last resort....
How do you teach line-up? To use a trite expression, "Practicing doesn't make perfect. Practicing perfect makes perfect." Example: Where do you stand during line-up? Most teachers stand at the front of the line, signal then turn and walk. This is the worst spot. Why? How many students can you see when walking with your back to line? Answer: 0. Any they know it. When lining up place yourself at the back of the line. If there are kids likely to goof off place them at the back too. Tell a line leader at the front to watch and listen for your signal to "Stop". When starting tell line leader to walk to next classroom door (judgment) and stop. Then next door and so on. Call it "Checking for understanding". You want to check spacing, facing forward and no talking. If any of these are not to your standards it's turn around - check- and back to room. Do not wait for disruption then stop. Although you will do this too. Idea is to be proactive and stop disruption before it happens, hence, the stop and check.

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...The classroom procedures were established at the beginning of the year become less and less effective as time goes on. It starts with call-back signals and quiet expectations, because there's no way to practice being quiet, nor is there a way to enforce the expectation. Once that goes, the other procedures start falling down as well. Practicing these procedures "until they get it right" results in practicing until we run out of instruction time ...
I agree. Quiet is difficult to teach and enforce. Consider: no talking. How about a Mute Session?

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...Tomorrow I'm not going to make a lot of changes to the procedures, rather I'll reinforce the same procedures in place from the beginning of the year. The main problem is the quiet signal which is no longer being respected: "Class-Class" should be responded with, "yes, yes" but only two or three students actually do so. "if you can hear my voice clap once..." is also used and is also no longer effective. Lining up and walking quietly in class is actually much better than last year, so it won't need a lot of work. ...
How do you feel about verbal commands with a group that is too verbal to begin with? Could it be promoting the behavior you are trying to eliminate?

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...Coming in from recess still needs work. The students prefer to stand around talking in 115 Arizona sun rather than get in a straight, quiet line and come into the air conditioned building. It takes several minutes to get everyone in line without someone popping back out to socialize. Now that temperatures have dropped below 100, I expect more difficulty. Last year we spent ten minutes walking back and forth in the hallways each day before they finally chose to follow expectations. ...
I don't blame them. Sooner they get back to the room sooner they have to get back to work. Going back and forth may be reinforcing behavior you are trying to eliminate. Yes, correct practice over and over is what teaches student to respect you. In this case, however, there is no incentive for the goof offs to shape up. Have you tried an incentive which outweighs the reinforcement of talking to friends? Without a heavy-duty incentive you are asking students to miraculously develop a proper work ethic even though many come from homes where chores are done by their parents.

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...At issue is some students who think, "ten seconds to get your notebook out" means, "play around for ten seconds and then consider thinking about maybe getting something ready if you bothered to listen to the instructions and you feel like doing work today". A lot of transition time was spent getting eight or nine individual students to follow simple instructions like that. ...
Consider an incentive like PAT to get students to hustle. In one class a teacher using PAT was able to have students enter the room, go to their seats, take out materials and begin on bell work assignment in 17 seconds. Prior to PAT it took same class 2'45'' to perform same procedure.

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What is a good way to gain respect? To my knowledge, I'm doing everything required to earn respect, but apparently it's not working.
Although there are others, one way to gain respect is the thoroughness in which you teach a rule or procedure. Better to nail down one routine to mastery than five routines half learned. In other words, when you say "No" students need to perceive it as no and not something else.
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