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Fenwick Fenwick is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 358
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Fenwick
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 358
Full Member

Old 11-29-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #32

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...It's getting them into a line that takes multiple attempts. ...
Why do you think students are not responding the first time?

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So what happens if a voice is heard during a mute session? If there is no way to determine the source, what is the consequence? What if a quarter of the class simply chooses to ignore the expectations and keep right on talking?
First, if a quarter of the class is ignoring my attempt at Mute Session I would can it pronto. It's not a reactionary technique to punish students for goofing off. It's a preventative technique to teach students they don't need to talk in the first place. I would have to reload my discipline plan and find out what I'm doing or not doing that signals to students goofing off is free. Second, if a voice is heard, and it happens often, I would deal with that particular student. Easiest way I've found to determine source is watching. Their mouths tend to open. Mute Session is 180 degrees from what kids have been doing since about a year old - talk. It takes some training to get them to write or draw everything.

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Do you have any suggestions?
Whatever you choose it should satisfy three qualities: 1) get the job done 2) save you time 3) self eliminate. For many teachers (myself included) it's #2 that causes many interventions to be discarded. They cost too much time and energy to run them. Spending weekends at the Dollar Store, organizing, record keeping, passing out, collecting, making charts, moving clips-cards-pins to name a few can wear a teacher down. All of that time comes out of more important endeavors like planning effective lessons. Oh, and wear a flack jacket should you award Jenny with a Lucky Buck but miss Danny for the same behavior.

I lean heavily towards Fred Jones' Responsibility Training. For the price of writing 1-3 numbers plus a colon on the board the whole class will line themselves up to your standards in less than 30 seconds. Using "teacher bonus" (called "extra bonus" too) the worst student(s) who would normally try to sabotage anything the teacher tries can be turned around and made a hero. And you don't have to intervene. The class will do it for you. For the rare student who still doesn't want to buy in, Omission Training eliminates him/her from RT. In ten years I've never had to use OT.

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My class has been doing a version of PAT since the beginning of the year. We usually gain 15 to 20 minutes each week that can be used on a Fun Friday.
Great! Gaining 15 to 20 minutes is impressive and exactly the way +/- time is supposed to work. Waiting for Friday may be too long for your group. They may not associate the immediate reward of goofing off in the present with reward coming down the road. I never had a set day for PAT. I used it as needed. If students were particularly squirrelly I might use it that day to focus them on reward over misbehavior. If I thought they could wait I might schedule it three days later. Also, as I stated, it took me four tries to nail down PAT. I was using it for discipline. That's not it's domain. It's a hurry up incentive. It's perfect for getting kids to line up, pass papers, move desks, clean up, bring pencils and homework etc. quickly the first time you ask.
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