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K12ENLTeacher K12ENLTeacher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 58
Junior Member

K12ENLTeacher
 
Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 58
Junior Member
Difficult Situation
Old 08-09-2019, 11:55 PM
 
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I understand that you have classes based on the disability/needs of the students, right? If so, it looks like the typical small groups based on the ability level. I think you should treat it just like a regular class where you differentiate your instruction: content, delivery, and product. If you have an assistant, use that person to your advantage. You may want to teach a whole group (differentiated delivery) where you will choose a method of delivery of the content. Think of your students' needs and plan how you want to deliver the content (movie, PPP, chart paper, demonstration, etc). While students are on the meeting area, walk around and start informally planning small groups at this time. After your mini-lesson, announce the groups, explicitly. I think low, on level and hi are enough of groups. As far as planning lessons, I think no need to plan separate lessons. What you can do is within your main lesson you can include modifications to the lesson content (here is where you differentiate the content for each group you formed). You may want to reteach for the low group, but using a different strategy. You may also want to think of a different method of delivery, based on your quick assessment of might have or not worked in your whole group instruction. Such modifications you include in your main lesson. While you work with low group, your assistant, if you have one, can rotate between the on-level and hi groups. Remember, do not spend more than 10-15 minutes with any group.
I think your best bet is to speak to your grade level teachers and ask how they do their lesson plans.
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