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WGReading WGReading is offline
 
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WGReading
 
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Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 866
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Old 02-26-2018, 06:41 AM
 
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How many students are in your group? Are there specific skill deficits you are addressing?

45 minutes is a long time for Tier 3 intervention, so I'm assuming you have a small group that is well below grade level.

Our 5th grade struggling readers are VERY difficult to motivate. They've spent years falling further and further behind and are used to failure, so their willingness to put themselves out there is very limited. With our students who see me for Tier 3 (in my school, I see Tier 3 students 1:1 or 1:2 for 10-15 minutes/day above and beyond their classroom reading and small group times), I try to get to know them and figure out what might motivate them, what they would consider a reward, and work towards student goal setting.

My students are given reading diagnostic inventory and we work on the most basic skill area they are missing. Sometimes that means phonemic awareness in 5th grade, or CVC words. My students actually like using word cards for rapid auto naming/speed decoding practice. We review the phonics skill they are missing, then they have a card stack with words of that pattern/skill. We set a goal for cards/minute or time to read all cards, and they work towards meeting that goal. That taps in to a sense of competition but it's against themselves and set so it is something they can do. When they show mastery of that skill, I move them on - no time to hang out working on something they know!!

Depending on what the goals are for your group, another plan I use to increase engagement with those upper elementary struggling readers is to do a group novel study BUT I offer 3-5 choices (that are instructional level), do a book talk on each and let the group choose their book. For the first novel, I do almost nothing explicitly academic with it. We read together and then I check in to monitor comprehension and explain things they may have missed (difficult vocab, character motivation, obvious foreshadowing). No homework, no tests, no note taking, etc. If I make a good match between book and group, usually about halfway into the book, the students start asking to take it home to keep reading, which I let them do but don't require. My goal is to show these students that reading can be fun, and to help them develop the skills to read a novel (I've had many 5th graders in these groups who don't understand how chapters and page numbers work sometimes - like why doesn't that page have a # on the bottom? what page is that?). It is supported in group work, so they successfully read their book and are doing the things they see their peers doing. As we go on, I continue offering choices and start building in more comprehension instruction but always authentically within the discussion of the text. I obviously offer book choices that I think the students will like, but I will also set up the choice to encourage trying new text types - like I might offer 4 choices and all of them are information text so that we read nonfiction as well.

I hope this helps!
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