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Mrs.Lilbit Mrs.Lilbit is offline
 
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Mrs.Lilbit
 
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Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 2,945
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Old 10-18-2015, 05:08 PM
 
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Thank you both for your responses. They definitely helped. Based on your responses, I went back and reread the program requirements at the university I am considering and I think you helped clear up some misconceptions I had about it.

The university offers a MS/PhD degree in either school or clinical psychology (both specialties are APA accredited). Both require a thesis and a dissertation. There is also a MA/EdS degree in school psychology (non-thesis, accredited by NASP/CAEP).

At this point, I'm definitely leaning toward the PhD in School Psychology, more than the EdS (for no other reason than I would like to be able make people call me Dr. when I'm done ). I'm really not interested in clinical work, I only considered the clinical route if it would open more opportunities than just working in a school system. I like the idea of having more options with a PhD than with an EdS.

If I'm reading the information correctly, regardless of which route I choose, I won't be able to "skip" the masters because they are both "two in one" programs. And, since all of my courses with my M.Ed. degree were education courses and all the requirements for this program are psych courses, I doubt any of my coursework will transfer over.

Right now, teaching gifted, I work closely with the school psychs when making referrals and developing IEPs. I honestly like the paperwork and the IEP meetings better than the teaching! There are still things that I love about teaching, but the evaluation process is killing that love. I also like the idea of working closely with one student at a time, rather than trying to manage an entire classroom.

With my current Masters, I did not have to take the GRE before enrolling, so I'm guessing I need to take that before applying to this university. I'm also worried about money and balancing work, family/kids, and graduate school. I worry how long this will take since my oldest is a freshman in high school. Ideally, I would love to have this behind me when he goes to college, but realistically, even if I started with the 16-17 school year, I'm guessing this will take 4-6 total years to complete (?). The deadline for applying is in February. I don't know if that's enough time to make up my mind and prepare for this! I would probably be better off taking the GRE next summer and applying for the 17-18 school year. But there's another part of my mind that thinks that's too far away and if I am serious about it, I should get it done as soon as possible.

Thanks again for the advice. I have a lot to think about.
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