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GraceKrispy GraceKrispy is offline
 
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GraceKrispy
 
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Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,766
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Old 10-18-2015, 06:07 PM
 
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Based on what you discovered, I have some additional thoughts. First of all, it's great that you have a good idea of what the school psychs in your area do- that's huge! If you like the job, then that's a great thing

Only PhD programs are accredited by APA, in my understanding, so if you were to stop at the MS, it wouldn't be accredited by APA because it wouldn't need to be. So the MA/EdS in school psych is terminal? You don't go from there to the PhD? Just wondering- it's nice to be accredited by NASP since it makes it easier to get NCSP (National Certification in School Psychology). Just check a box, turn in signed forms, and take the Praxis. You have to do more to get it if you go through a non-NASP accredited program, but it's not impossible. Some districts pay a stipend if you have that. Mine didn't, but some do

The university offers a MS/PhD degree in either school or clinical psychology (both specialties are APA accredited). Both require a thesis and a dissertation. There is also a MA/EdS degree in school psychology (non-thesis, accredited by NASP/CAEP).

If you really only plan to work in schools, then it might not be worth the money/time to get a PhD unless your district rewards that monetarily (some districts don't) and/or you really really want to be called Doctor It does give more options to become involved in research and private practice.

I think you're probably right about not being able to skip the masters. Most programs want you to go through the process together with them. I don't know if the PhD program available to you in school psych requires you to do a MS level internship. My program gives an EdS (two FULL TIME years of coursework, then one year of FULL TIME internship) and THEN you start the PhD level work, and that's an additional 2 years of course work and another FULL TIME internship (I just like capitalizing full time ). SOme people can do it in 1 year of coursework, but it's really hard and requires a LOT of time. So my program is 5-6 years to doctorate altogether. Since I got my MEd from them (that was before they changed it to EdS), I was able to start on the PhD track right away. I was already a school psych, so no need to retake the same exact courses. You might be able to petition out of a class here and there if you took the equivalent in your masters program, but it's almost impossible in our program to do that. My school psych program is housed in the Education department (that varies quite a bit by university), and some of the courses were education courses (which makes sense to me, since you want school psychs to have a good background in education!).

I have three kids who were in 5th, 6th, and 8th grade when I started back for the PhD portion. They are now 7th, 8th, and 10th grades. Since the program is full-time, I won't lie that it's been a challenge and a lot of work. The first year, dh wasn't in the same state (he was making money in our former state) and that was really tough for all of us. The last year plus he's been here and it's been so much better. Unfortunately, we have next to no money, so that's the challenge now.

Good luck deciding when and how
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