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Eliza Eliza is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
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Eliza
 
Eliza's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 05-14-2019, 02:12 PM
 
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Asking for the letter isn't going to be the problem. The letter itself is likely to be the problem. As someone who has hosted student teachers in the past, I have some experience in writing those letters and knowing I'm staking my reputation on that letter. If I write a strong recommendation letter when it is not warranted no one will take future letters of recommendation seriously.

If, in your reviews, your mentor teacher said you might be ready to teach in five years, you are not going to get a recommendation letter that will encourage schools to hire you unless you can show that you've remediated the issues that occurred during student teaching.

One thing to think about - do you really want to teach? I had a student teacher who found himself in a situation somewhat similar to yours, right down to the depression and anxiety. Though he did not share that information with the university, which left him less support than he should have received until it was entirely too late. He sounded a lot like you, "I can't waste this money. I have to finish."

He made the decision not to complete his student teaching and graduated with a slightly different degree than he'd originally planned (the local university has a back-up plan for people who realize teaching isn't for them during/after student teaching). I think that was the best possible decision for all involved. If you don't love teaching and you haven't (or can't yet) figured out how to work around the depression and anxiety, your first year of teaching will be far worse than anything that occurred during student teaching. It is not a sign of weakness nor is it failure to decide teaching is not for you right now.

If, at the end of the day, you decide to ask for that letter, ask your mentor teacher to give you a realistic idea of what will go into that letter. If he cannot recommend you for a position, ask your university supervisor or someone else connected to the university and/or an earlier practicum teacher who might be willing to write a letter.
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