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WGReading WGReading is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2017
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WGReading
 
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Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 730
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:04 PM
 
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What do I think: it's a way for your P to minimize the impact of the new teacher by limiting her responsibility at the beginning. I also think it ultimately shouldn't be your decision re: what the other teacher is doing either in content or form. I am not meaning you are in the wrong in any way, just that as teachers we shouldn't be put in that position, our admin should be doing that. As a reading spec/IC, that happens to me sometimes and it almost always causes friction.

re: the model - our K-5 building has 1 SPED resource teacher who has a full time para. In our state, I am able to provide SPED minutes for reading. Our SPED teacher is amazing and her para is... not, but the teacher makes it work. SPED teacher has a group each for K-5 that meets during the grade level assigned small group time. When a grade level has more than 5 kids on IEPs for reading, I always have a group at that grade level (my day is not 100% teaching, so I don't have a group in every grade) and the SPED teacher and I meet and I take a group of students on IEPs as well. Then we work closely together re: the progress of those students. In the meantime, her para teaches the math groups because we have a very structured remedial math curriculum that I guess is pretty easy to deliver.

Thinking of your scenario in my building, if a 2nd SPED teacher was added and the idea was to push in, I would probably do that during gen ed writing to meet writing IEP minutes. Having someone to differentiate and scaffold writing assignments , to scribe, or provide other accommodations would probably be the easiest way to introduce a form of co-teaching and benefit the students. In my building, writing instruction in the classrooms varies in effectiveness, but it is by far the subject area where teachers need the most support and guidance as far as how to meet the needs of students with learning disabilities.

I don't know what your upper grade skill levels look like, but I used to be worried about teaching 4th-5th, and in the past few years have really grown to enjoy it. I do a lot of syllable work with my older students, they LOVE.IT. (!!!) and it has transferred to successful growth in fluency rate, accuracy, and spelling, and, IMO though I can't necessarily prove it, is helping boost comprehension because the reading is finally clicking for them.

In terms of case management, I would think you'd divide the case load and then collaborate on documentation, etc.
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