What is your definition of inclusion? - ProTeacher Community



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What is your definition of inclusion?
Old 07-26-2009, 10:00 PM
 
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I am curious to know what everyone thinks inclusion is- does it mean for the whole day? or for part of the day? or for one period?

I ask because we have mainstreaming- which is the child ispart or one period of the day and then we have inclusion which is full day.


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Old 07-26-2009, 10:31 PM
 
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We have inclusion at our school. The child is in the class for the whole day but the special ed teacher comes in for their time and assists during math and reading. We area k-5 school with 6 classes of each grades. We made one class, each grade level, the inclusion and regular ed students.
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Old 07-27-2009, 02:39 AM
 
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" the special ed teacher comes in for their time and assists during math and reading. "

This is my first year and will be doing some push-in and I have no idea how that works...
Can you explain what the special ed teacher does while she/he assist the student in their work? Supplement what the classroom teacher gives the student to work on?

Also, what are some of the quirks you shouldn't do to annoy the classroom teachers?

Suggestions are appreciated!
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Inclusion...
Old 07-27-2009, 06:46 AM
 
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in my school district, inclusion is whenever you have a child with a disability who is being taught with his/her non-disabled peers. (The term is used interchangeably with mainstreaming.) It depends on the individual whether this is for one or two classes or the entire day. A lot of times in some of the inclusion classes, there is co-teaching with a regular teacher and special education teacher. The special education teacher is not only there for the students with disabilities though. The teachers have shared responsibility for everyone in the classroom. Sometimes the regular teacher leads instruction and the special ed. teacher supports and vice versa. (Common planning time is very important in co-teaching so that one teacher isn't feeling the burden of all of the work and planning.)
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inclusion
Old 07-27-2009, 06:59 AM
 
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I learned that mainstreaming is when a child with disabilities is served in self contained for most of the day but attends a basic ed class for a few subjects. Inclusion is when the child's needs are met in the basic ed class with special ed support.


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Inclusion,
Old 07-27-2009, 07:40 AM
 
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as, all special education should be able planning an education program that best fits the needs of the individual children in the LRE or most independent environment. I teach inclusion, and every student on my caseload needs a different amount of support both inside and outside the general education classroom. I could not possibly have created a one size fits all program or definition for them.
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Old 07-27-2009, 08:53 AM
 
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blueheron said it best. For me, 'Inclusion" means the child is in the class full-time with appropriate support for that particular child. The support can be in the form of a Spec Ed assistant or Spec Ed teacher. For some children, it means one-to-one support at all times, for others, it means one-to-one support for core subjects like LA, Math, etc. and less support for the softer subjects. What I'd like to see is one-to-one support at the beginning of the year and gradually weaning off as needed.
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I think this explains it well
Old 07-27-2009, 09:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Mainstreaming was an attempt -- ill-founded and unsuccessful -- to place students with disabilities in typical classrooms, hoping that they might succeed. Mainstreaming basically says, "We won't change the regular classroom, the curriculum, the teaching, or pay much attention to the social environment, but if you can succeed here, you are allowed to stay." Not surprisingly, students with disabilities, many of whom had a history of school failure already, didn't do well, and then, their lack of success was seen as evidence of their inability to be with typical students.

"Inclusion says…'You have a right to be here. This is your classroom and your school as much as is any other student's.'"
Inclusion says, instead, "You have a right to be here. This is your classroom and your school as much as is any other student's. We will do what we need to make this classroom a safe, welcoming, and successful environment for you. We will make sure that the curriculum is broad, that the pedagogy meets your needs, and that the social environment is carefully structured to promote acceptance and welcome for you and for every other student in the classroom."
I found it here:
http://www.education-world.com/a_iss.../chat206.shtml


That's pretty much the way our district regards the difference- a student "mainstreamed" in is doing so without supports. Inclusion follows the idea that ALL students are in with their regular peers, AND that all stakeholders are involved in the process to make them successful.

I some times come across case managers who use the term "inclusion" for those times a student is in the regular class for activities that don't necessarily focus on academics (i.e. read aloud, calendar, free time etc.). They look at inclusion as a time when disabled students can be in for social reasons. I don't agree. It's mainstreaming whether they want to admit it, or not.

Last edited by Speced9; 07-27-2009 at 09:45 AM.. Reason: addition
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