Inner-city School Discipline - ProTeacher Community





Optimistic's Avatar
Optimistic Optimistic is offline
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 80

Optimistic
Junior Member
 
Optimistic's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 80
Inner-city School Discipline
Old 09-23-2013, 07:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I am in need of some strong disciplinary / classroom management ideas for inner-city youth (third grade). Please only reply if you have experience of working with a very hard group of students to discipline. Please refrain from responding with color card systems and other "cute" ideas. It definitely will not work for this group. Thank you.


Optimistic is offline   Reply With Quote


petuniapatty petuniapatty is offline
New Member
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 8

petuniapatty
New Member
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 8
answer
Old 09-27-2013, 02:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Engaging lessons first.
Ronald Clark story second.
Prayer third, or first.
Persistence fourth.


I know you want more...
petuniapatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Dreamer625's Avatar
Dreamer625 Dreamer625 is online now
Full Member
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 381

Dreamer625
Full Member
 
Dreamer625's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 381

Old 09-27-2013, 04:11 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I taught in an inner city school for 2 1/2 years. I learned to be firm, consistent, and break lessons/activities into smaller chunks of time. The other think I learned was to not say please. Saying please seemed to make the direction an option. For example, I would never say please return to your seats - it was Return to your seats. Thank You. I don't know if that will help you or not.
Dreamer625 is online now   Reply With Quote
Zippy Dee Zippy Dee is offline
New Member
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 7

Zippy Dee
New Member
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 7
Things that have worked for me
Old 09-27-2013, 04:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have worked in inner city schools for sixteen years and here's what is currently working for me in fourth grade:

- Weekly Report Form regarding behavior and work habits. These are sent home on Friday and must be returned signed on Monday. If students do not turn in the weekly reports they do not get recess until it is returned.

-Group points. Points are rewarded to groups that follow instructions, are on task, are ready to listen, or any other thing I want to reward and reinforce. Once one group gets a point for doing the right thing the other groups quickly get their act together. At the end of the week the group of the week gets to pick from the prize box. If you don't want to do prizes you could have the winning group eat lunch with you one day (my students love that), be first group called in line, etc.

-Call parents/families and explain that their student's behavior is interfering with the child's learning. The families want their children to get an education.

-Don't rely on office referrals as a consequence, unless you have support from administration. My students aren't scared of discipline referrals because there are no consequences for disruptive behavior. I tell the student what the problem is and give them the choice of fixing it or having their family fix it for them.

-Don't say please and don't ask the students do something. State what you want the students to do and then say thank you.

-Never allow students to talk back when told to do something. Remind them of the difference between an imperative sentence and an interrogative sentence.

-Be prepared to practice procedures many times throughout the year. Use part of recess to practice if you need to.

-Don't be afraid to try new classroom management ideas. Don't be afraid to quickly discard an idea if it is not working.

-Heap on the verbal praise for students caught doing good.

-Try to build strong relationships with your most disruptive students.

-Laugh everyday, take good care of yourself, and remember that they are only 8 or 9 years old.
Zippy Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
mommy9298's Avatar
mommy9298 mommy9298 is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,367

mommy9298
Senior Member
 
mommy9298's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,367
cute is out
Old 09-28-2013, 05:03 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Let them know you are firm and mean business. They can spot a weak teacher instantly. You have to be consistent.


mommy9298 is offline   Reply With Quote
StellatheSub's Avatar
StellatheSub StellatheSub is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,403

StellatheSub
Senior Member
 
StellatheSub's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,403

Old 09-29-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Two words - call and response. I have used it for everything. When I read a story, I pause and have them fill in particular words to keep them on track. When I need full class attention - if you can hear me, can i get a yes Miss X? One more time - Yes Miss X. Also, there were times when I allowed no talking what so ever. I also would remain silent during those times. Also, I don't allow interrupting, and if a student starts to talk when I told them not to I will say nuh, uh, nuh, nuh and I don't stop until they stop talking. I was very firm with that. Nicey nice doesn't work. 4 years of inner city subbing full time experience here. When I take away their recess or part of it for extreme behavior I make them put their heads down and don't allow them to look at other students. I make sure it's a consequence that hurts and then at the end we talk about their behavior and what I will expect to see next time. Number one thing - praise. Inner city students need lots of praise, they enjoy verbal praise more than any type of toy or candy you could every give them. It's verbal candy to them!
StellatheSub is offline   Reply With Quote
Claire's Avatar
Claire Claire is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,566

Claire
Senior Member
 
Claire's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,566

Old 12-06-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

14 years all title I low SES schools. First and foremost you have to build relationships with them. Let them know you genuinely care. I am not saying be nicey nicey. Show interest in them as PEOPLE not just students. Ask how so and sos football game was Saturday. How the new baby sister is doing etc. Seems easy right? You would not believe how many teachers at my school I have seen fail and resign or be let go simply because they fail to connect with the students and the students do not respect them.

Be firm and fair. Do not take any disrespect. Be very consistent. They should know clearly what behaviors are acceptable to you and which are not. They should "test" once or twice and then know what they cannot get away with.

Treat them with the same respect you would like. Do not yell. Frame a request with "(name) I need you to (blah blah blah) please sir. Thank you." Respectful and you convey the expectation that he will follow your request immediately. You are not waiting to see if he will or will not. Request and walk. Look back in a minute or two. Do not get into a power struggle. Do not back them into a corner where they feel that they need to save face by defying or disrespecting you. Handle embarrassing things quietly and privately.

Use more positive than negative. Table points, tickets, praise. Over all, kids are kids. They all want to be loved and cared for even the hardest ones. Usually the hardest ones most of all. They want to see if you will give up on them.
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Classroom Management
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:21 PM.

Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
6