Swahili anyone? - ProTeacher Community


Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      ESL/LEP

Swahili anyone?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
sjgriffin sjgriffin is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member

sjgriffin
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member
Swahili anyone?
Old 07-05-2016, 05:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I have been teaching for close to 20 years in Catholic Schools. This year I and moving to a new school and have been asked to work with a family of four students (4th, 5th, 7th and 8th grades) who came from Tanzania and speak Swahili. They have been here for a year, but had no formal ESL instruction last year. (This is a poor school in an immigrant community.)

I would love someone to point me in right direction so I can start to plan for the school year. I will meet with the the students two times a week.

I have read other postings and will visit some of the web sites listed and view videos.

Thanks for any suggestions.


sjgriffin is offline   Reply With Quote

Zia's Avatar
Zia Zia is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 9,985
Senior Member

Zia
 
Zia's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 9,985
Senior Member

Old 07-08-2016, 11:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I usually have 3-6 different home languages in my classroom. The only thing I take into consideration about their home language is alphabet and directionality. Other than that, teaching English is teaching English.
Zia is offline   Reply With Quote
tyrex tyrex is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 788
Senior Member

tyrex
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 788
Senior Member
literacy?
Old 07-10-2016, 09:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

How literate are they in their native language and how strong of an academic background do they have from their native country? At their ages, those are huge factors that will influence their progress more than anything except for their motivation. At their ages their process for learning language will be very different than that of non English speakers who enter school in primary grades.

I think your first step needs to be examining their files. Hopefully there are writing samples and a portfolio with work samples. Beware of just going by report card grades, since a lot of teachers of newcomers will grade based on effort only, or exempt them from most assignments.

If you post back with more info I will try to offer specific suggestions.
tyrex is online now   Reply With Quote
SusanTeach's Avatar
SusanTeach SusanTeach is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 15,162
Senior Member

SusanTeach
 
SusanTeach's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 15,162
Senior Member
Swahili
Old 07-10-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

When I had a student from Egypt (he spoke Arabic), we immediately put him on Rosetta Stone on the computer. It was wonderful! He did that for an hour each day. I got him in October, and in May he took the state test and scored Proficient in Language!

I get no endorsements from Rosetta Stone , I just wanted to say how well it worked for my student.

There's also a free app called duolingo that you could let him use daily, if your school won't buy the other.

I taught some Swahili when we were studying Africa, and it was really fun. There were words that I had no idea were Swahili words (Simba means lion, Rafiki means friend, ..... The Lion King used several Swahili words! ).
SusanTeach is offline   Reply With Quote
Tiamat Tiamat is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,104
Senior Member

Tiamat
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,104
Senior Member

Old 07-11-2016, 11:05 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I also have multiple home languages in my classrooms and focus on English. I try and find out levels of literacy in their home language and, as ECGen 23 said, alphabet and direction of their writing, but otherwise we work on English. I try to focus on spoken language first, as I believe they can't effectively read or write until they can speak and say, but I get a lot of pressure on this from admin and class teachers.

Have you taught ESL at all before? If you don't have things you usually do with new arrivals, focus on basic survival vocabulary first - school vocabulary, orientation to school with appropriate language (can they ask for the toilet? a drink? say if they are sick?). Especially for the olders ones, look at the work their class is doing, and try and help them with the language they need to access the curriculum being taught. For the younger ones, language that will help in the classroom generally is important.

Of course, if you've taught ESL before, this is all old news :-). Relax and enjoy the children - a different language doesn't make much difference to what we do, really.


Tiamat is offline   Reply With Quote
sjgriffin sjgriffin is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member

sjgriffin
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member

Old 07-19-2016, 05:43 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Thank you! That is good advice. I had not thought about looking at their records. I will do that when I stop by school.
sjgriffin is offline   Reply With Quote
sjgriffin sjgriffin is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member

sjgriffin
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 17
New Member

Old 07-19-2016, 06:01 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I have not taught ESL before that's why I need direction. Thank you for the information.
sjgriffin is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ESL/LEP
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:41 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net