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Into the classroom without training
Old 06-07-2017, 08:13 AM
 
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http://www.timestelegram.com/news/20...n-how-to-teach

Is this happening in your state also?


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Old 06-07-2017, 09:30 AM
 
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Unfortunately, it seems that I can't read the link without signing up for something. But I'm guessing they are letting people with subject degrees but not teaching degrees apply for positions because of a shortage?

To answer your question, no, that's not currently happening in my state. - But I do think it's going to happen, a lot. For various reasons, the best and brightest are no longer being encouraged to become teachers (or are shying away from it because of all the non-teaching garbage that goes with it). Schools are going to be scrambling for people who are dissatisfied enough with the corporate world to believe the grass is always greener in the schoolyard.

As for the results, I think they'll be mixed. I do believe there are people out there who are natural teachers. If they can show their stuff in the interview process, I have no problem with them being given a chance in an emergency. I think some of them will actually succeed. But I also think there are going to be people who try it and run into real trouble with things like classroom management.

Is there some sort of temporary status to the program?
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Old 06-07-2017, 10:50 AM
 
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Wait a few minutes after you click on the link, and the article will come up. (At least it did for me.)
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Old 06-08-2017, 02:00 AM
 
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Finally got to read the article. It sounds like they need to fix the problems that are making the certified teachers leave!

(And I believe those things - lack of funding, too much testing... - are problems everywhere, so I'm not just blaming Arizona!)

We keep trying to tweak a school model that simply doesn't fit our current world anymore, because we're scared (justifiably - we don't want to screw up our kids) of scrapping it and starting over.
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Old 06-08-2017, 02:45 AM
 
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I'm not aware of this happening in my area, but TFA is in my area, and IMO that's basically the same thing. I don't think the whole 5 weeks of training that TFA teachers get really counts for anything.

This year my district partnered with a "resident educator" program. The program is for people who have a BA in something else and want to become teachers. They pair them with mentor teachers for a year long student teaching experience while they take classes at night for their MA degree. I agreed to take on a resident this year partly because we were offered a nice stipend and I needed the money, and partly becuase I felt that this program was much better than something like TFA. It was really astounding how much having no background in education impacted my resident. She really needed to have those classes (and other field experiences) about clasroom management, assessment, teaching methods, etc. prior to coming into my room. I think it's possible that someone who was just a "natural teacher" could be successful in this program, but IMO it's impossible to tell who those people are prior to seeing them in a classroom. Last year, the first year we partnered with this program, there was a lot of competition to get the three mentor teaching spots in my building. After seeing/hearing how things went this year, not a single teacher in my building is willing to apply to be a mentor for next year!


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I find it a really bad idea
Old 06-08-2017, 06:17 AM
 
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when it comes to primary grades. This level is devoted to teach how to learn and behave in a classroom and not just curriculum to learn.

To fill teaching jobs they need to make the school a work friendly place and give a decent living wage with some benefits. When they offer low salaries and do not provide a safe environment then the students will lose every time.

To illustrate when I need surgery I go to the best surgeon, not the best tailor because he can do such a great job cutting and stitching.
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Old 06-08-2017, 11:33 AM
 
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I have a friend who is teaching without a certificate. She has a BA in child development, but had no teaching experience before going into the classroom. She has taught two years on a provisional certificate and has done really well. She has had 90+% of her kindergarten students pass the EOY exams in both ELA and math. This year is her internship year and she will have her certification at Christmas since she has been working on her MEd for the last two calendar years.

She has done well with this set up, but most people don't. She just has a natural teaching ability and does well with lower SES students.
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In my state
Old 06-11-2017, 06:05 AM
 
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Texas, we have an alternative certification program. Here is a link:
http://tea.texas.gov/index2.aspx?id=7073

This was first started due to a shortage of teachers. I know many teachers that have begun this route and are great teachers. Others have done this and quickly move into the ranks of administrators. It seems that those that move into administrative positions through this method have little to no classroom management. (my observation)

Some programs are good and some not so good.

In Texas we do not have a teacher shortage.
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Alternative Certification
Old 07-25-2017, 02:16 PM
 
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I did Alternative Certification in Texas, and it was hard. It's been almost 17 years, and I'm still teaching. Unfortunately, some quit in the middle of the year. Some didn't do well and had to do an additional year (actually 15 months). Fortunately, I did everything that I needed to do the first time. Cost me $5200 plus the price of books (university courses).

My district is having one last job fair on tomorrow to fill those few remaining positions.
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I'm an example
Old 07-26-2017, 06:00 AM
 
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I started as a welding teacher last October, I was a welder for 37 years then an opportunity to become an instructor became available. Was I ready for the classroom? No, I knew my subject thoroughly but the classroom side was a new experience for me. I had to learn a lot quickly, I was given a conditional certificate and 2 years to pass the praxis 1 and take 4 classes (12 credits) I was the fourth teacher in less than a year. This is a completely different career path for me and I'm willing to do what I have to become a teacher. I had to become a certified instructor for the curriculum I teach, which I've done. I'm currently almost at the end of my first college class and just took the praxis. I passed Reading but failed the math and just missed passing the writing. I've been studying and will be taking it again soon. In my school, many of the teachers have taken the same route because of the subjects we teach. I was told at one of my evaluations " we can find English teachers every day, we can't find you" I think in my state it depends on the subject.



Last edited by ccstwelds; 07-26-2017 at 08:53 AM..
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