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Teachercat2 Teachercat2 is offline
 
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No curriculum?
Old 08-29-2017, 04:24 PM
 
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Has anyone been in this situation.. I am starting as a sub separate/pull out teacher and there are no intensive decoding or reading programs for my students, not to mention no math or writing materials. For the other subjects I can most likely figure it out on my own as I have before.. but for readIng all of the success I've had in the past have been through using very structured, sequenced reading programs. What can I do?? All of my students are all different levels as well so it would be like planning 5 different decoding/reading lessons myself.. any ideas? Thanks!


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Old 08-30-2017, 01:24 PM
 
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Yikes! None at all? A lot of districts have some type of at least scripted program.... you might want to ask around to see if there are any extra resources anywhere in the district. I would think in a subseparate program, administration would want to make sure you had a full curriculum for at least reading.

When I worked in a *very* small district, in subseparate, we used Project Read. You can get by with just the Teacher's Manuals and supplement with phonics readers and/or phonics based reading passages you can find as supplements to most basal reading programs. They also tell you how to create a lot of the materials right in the teaching guide. Also, for writing, you could use Framing Your Thoughts - published by the same company as Project Read. Again, you can get by with just the manual and create materials as you go. Not ideal to have to create materials, but Project Read (even though it's older) is very much OG based and I had great success with it, just having the teacher's manuals and creating the student materials. There are three teachers manuals covering everything from letter/sound correspondence to Greek and Latin suffixes in the third manual. All three together Teacher's Manuals for Project Read phonics come in at under $500, so I would think it would be easy to get a PO for that price. Framing Your Thoughts has just two manuals - one for sentence writing and one for paragraph writing. Oh and they also have a comprehension program too!

For math, I am at a loss as well, sorry!! My last district's math program had supplements that I used, but my new district does not. I've reached out on this board several times to see what others use for math curriculum and it seems everyone just modifies and scaffolds with manips. I have actually found some really great resources on TpT though that I supplement with.

Hope that helps, good luck!
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Old 08-30-2017, 04:21 PM
 
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I've never heard the term "sub separate" so I'm not sure if that means something different than just resource/pull out, but in my first resource job I had no curriculum. I just created my own activities that matched the students' IEP goals. If you have kids working on drastically different things within the same group, I would set up reading rotations kind of like you would in a gen ed room. That way the students will spend some time with you getting direct instruction with whatever skill they need and when they're not with you they can be working on differentiated centers.

When I was a classroom teacher I gave each student a color and had 3-5 different activities/assignments at each center, and they knew they always did the "red" activity or whatever. It's truly not as much work as it sounds like! Once you have your base activity, it's easy to differentiate up/down, especially to those of us in SPED who are used to this sort of thing.

In my current resource position I have two scripted programs available, but I don't use either of them. I've basically created my own phonics curriculum with OG strategies over the years. I also supplement with Explode the Code, which is a useful activity if you need kids to be working independently at some point, IMO. Explode the Code is basically worksheets, which I know are frowned on in some schools, so it depends on your admin. The books are very cheap though. Last year an instructional coach introduced us to the West Virginia Reading First phonics lessons, which I'm pretty sure are free online. The scope and sequence was pretty much the exact same thing I'd already created myself (wish I had seen that earlier ). IMO the lessons definitely need some "jazzing up" but if you need a place to start or really want a script to follow, it would be easy to use.

This is actually my very first year that I've had a "real" math program- my district bought the new intervention program for Bridges (gen ed uses Bridges). It's a tier 2 program, but it's better than nothing! Most of my students tend to be much better at math than reading anyway, and I figure I can modify if necessary. In the past I've mostly just focused on computation strategies with a guided release model. Students learned the skills I taught very well, but it obviously wasn't very comprehensive. I like that my new program will be the same language/visuals/concepts that they're learning in gen ed.
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Teachercat2 Teachercat2 is offline
 
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Thanks!
Old 08-31-2017, 03:26 AM
 
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I also used to use project read at my old school and liked it! Maybe I could suggest the district buy at least the manuals but I don't know how well that would go over since I'm a new teacher there!
They have one fundations kit that I have found but I don't really see that as being the best for a tier 3 intervention as they also use it in gen ed classrooms.
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Thanks!
Old 08-31-2017, 03:29 AM
 
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Thanks for the your suggestions! I don't Neccesarily need a scripted program but I just find not having something like that for reading does not lead to great results in my experience. If I have a scope and sequence and program to use and then add my own components I've seen great success with struggling readers. It's just so weird this district wouldn't have any programs for tier 2 and 3 phonics..
Oh and a sub separate is where the students are with me in a small group for pretty much the entire day.. so it's pull out but they come to me for every subject basically. Maybe that is an old term?


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Old 08-31-2017, 10:03 AM
 
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I have the same concerns with Fundations not being Tier 3 - the publisher even says it's not meant for level of intervention so it drives me a little crazy when administration suggests it as a potential resource for my room! My district mainly uses Fundations in the gen. ed room in 1st and 2nd grade. Not ideal to use it again with 3rd and 4th graders because they remember doing it in first and second and it just reinforces for them that they have fallen behind their peers.

I just did a 30 hour OG comprehensive training and planned on using Recipe for Reading. I liked the flexibility that this particular training offered to teachers - I'm not really a fan of scripted reading programs either, but I did like how it incorporated all five components of reading, whereas some of the more unstructured programs (like the OG training I just went to), you have to get a little more creative with interweaving comprehension and vocabulary, things like that. I also had a para last year and it was a quick and easy way to get her involved with instruction without having to do extra prep on my part.

If you really love Project Read, have you thought about doing a fundraising campaign on donorschoose.org?? I get not wanting to ask the district... separately, how sad is that, that us newbies feel like we can't ask for basic things like curriculum?! But I digress lol.

Good luck!
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Old 09-03-2017, 08:05 AM
 
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Here's what I would do in your situation. Always arrive at least one hour before the start of school. Ask the school secretary to recommend a veteran teacher or two that might provide you with some immediate help. Find the teachers and ask them if they have any appropriate materials that you can borrow for the day being sure to briefly describe the different levels in the class. Do this as quickly as possible so that you can peruse and organize the materials back in the classroom and prepare any needed copies. Good luck!
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