Science lessons - ProTeacher Community


Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      High School

Science lessons

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
MrsGrizzie MrsGrizzie is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member

MrsGrizzie
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member
Science lessons
Old 07-01-2017, 06:02 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I teach physical science and honors physics. I have only taught these classes for my two years of teaching. I have struggled to plan engaging lessons. I am terrible at pacing and knowing which activities to do and how to make a lesson last a whole class period. I have gotten so discouraged that I have contemplated quitting. As a teacher, I should love planning fun lessons but I dread and hate planning.

Now my school system is changing from a 7 period day to 5 block day. So instead of 50 minute periods all year, I will have 75 minutes to cover the material in 18 weeks. I am freaking out internally. I have never taught on a block. Also, the students can barely pay attention for 50 minutes (more like 30 minutes really). I think there will be more discipline problems because of it.

Can someone give me some advice on how to design lessons for a 75 minute class? How would you pace a lesson? I have done bell ringers and exit slips in the past which have somewhat worked.

My biggest concern is what to do with the main content. I like doing some notes but most kids get bored with that quickly. Should I have them read and take their own notes? I should preface this by saying that my system has no technology for students. No ipads, chromebooms,etc. I only have a laptop and a projector.

I'm trying to find some things they can do on their phones, but our internet is horrible. So I am very limited as to what technology I can use.

Any suggestions would be great!


MrsGrizzie is offline   Reply With Quote

lisa53's Avatar
lisa53 lisa53 is online now
 
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 4,456
Senior Member

lisa53
 
lisa53's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 4,456
Senior Member

Old 07-02-2017, 02:27 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I taught chemistry and physical science for 40 years. We never had longer periods, and I always wished we did. I think it would help you to plan transitions every 20-30 minutes, and to have a daily routine. Little labs and demonstrations are a good way to keep their attention, build skills, and help them understand the material.

I keep lectures and notes to 15 or 20 minutes. The rest of the time students are active. My routine is something like this:

-Bell-ringer: open notes quiz with questions from yesterday's lesson. Kids correct and score their own quiz, and I collect them. I don't count the scores in their grade (so no incentive for them to cheat) but it gives me and them information and is a good quick review
-Mini-lecture: Introduce the concepts for the lesson. I try to take no longer than 20 minutes for this.
-Demonstration (with student help) &/or Lab &/or practice problems &/or questions to answer &/or poster project
-Exit slip

I have coded the teacher centered activity in red and the student centered activities in green.

I hope this is helpful. It does require a lot of planning to do hands-on activities every single day, but your classes will go so much better that it is worth it.

You can offer challenges for some of the labs...for example, design a catapult that will land a missile on target from a certain distance, or create a machine that will allow you to pull a brick across a table with the least amount of force, or build a bridge that will hold the most weight. Kids love to compete!
lisa53 is online now   Reply With Quote
Teacher_twins's Avatar
Teacher_twins Teacher_twins is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 741
Senior Member

Teacher_twins
 
Teacher_twins's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 741
Senior Member
HS Math
Old 07-03-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I feel like science is one of the easiest subjects to plan engaging lessons. I am not sure of your room set up and budget, but labs are a great way to get students engaged in what they are learning.

I taught 8th grade Physical Science for 2 years on a 50 minute period. I was very fortunate that my textbook was basically IPS for Dummies because it had (fun and cheap) labs built into the curriculum, so we would do 2 or 3 labs a week.

Here is sample of my week
M: Introduce Concept
T: Finish concept/go over lab procedures
W: LAB 1!!!
R: Reflect on lab and teach the rest of the concept
F: More advanced LAB!!!!!

I know not every curriculum is setup that way and I am sure your school does not have an unlimited budget for lab materials, but follow your textbook. Most textbooks have labs or teacher demonstrations built into them. Also, planning non-lab lessons can be as simple as adopting part of Whole Brain Teaching (not the call and response part) but teach for 2 or 3 minutes and then have them reteach to their partner, and then go on for another 2 or 3 minutes. This keeps kids accountable for paying attention.
Teacher_twins is offline   Reply With Quote
MrsGrizzie MrsGrizzie is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member

MrsGrizzie
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member

Old 07-08-2017, 06:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Thank you Lisa for your advice! You have a lot of teaching experience. Is the routine you listed, what you would do daily? I have struggled these past two years to develop a routine that works for me. Also, how did you do your notes? I've used a little bit of everything from PowerPoints to outline notes. I don't know what is the best.

Another thing is, do you allow your students to use their notes on tests? I have. I've read arguments for and against this idea. I do think it makes the kids lazy in that they know they won't have to study, but I don't want to have too many students start failing.
MrsGrizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
MrsGrizzie MrsGrizzie is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member

MrsGrizzie
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 9
New Member

Old 07-08-2017, 06:20 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Thank you Teacher_Twins for your advice. I agree with your first statement, but I have had such a hard time planning good lessons. I like your weekly routine. How does that work with a unit that might have multiple topics? Also, what activities do you use to introduce a concept? Notes, worksheet, textbook reading, or something else?

What was the textbook you used? I have a class set but I hate my textbook.


MrsGrizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
markm markm is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 11
New Member

markm
 
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 11
New Member
need 3 tasks
Old 09-21-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I have taught in a block, traditional and in trimesters - have to say I don't care for the block so much. If you do teach in the block you need to split the time up into 3 chunks - like stated by another poster - one chunk is lecture, another a hands on activity - another chunk work time. flipped classroom might be a help too - make a video of you explaining problems or concepts and let them work on it while you help. No way you can do the same thing for the whole block of time you and the students will be bored and frustrated. Better get used to the idea that less is more too - you will not be able to cover as many topics well on the block schedule.
markm is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
High School
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:35 PM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net