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Elite Private schools seek to end A-to-F grading

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Elite Private schools seek to end A-to-F grading
Old 09-17-2017, 11:33 AM
 
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"Itís not a wild dream: Itís a goal more than 120 of the nationís elite high schools have come together to achieve.

ďThe grading system is imploding on itself. When you get to the point where 75 percent of kids have a 4.0 grade-point average, thatís meaningless,Ē said Than Healy, head of Menlo School, a private college prep high school in Atherton. ďAll that tells the kids is that nothing but an A is acceptable.Ē...
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Old 09-17-2017, 11:51 AM
 
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I think the idea has potential. I certainly agree with what it said about the currently-used grades not meaning the same thing they used to.
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Ok for private schools
Old 09-17-2017, 12:03 PM
 
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The article does point out that these are private hs schools where there are 15 kids per class and teachers only carry 4 caseloads. As an elementary school teacher -- it's very time consuming for me to write 25 or 30 comments each grading period for my students -- i can't imagine doing that with a public hs student load.
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Ok for private schools
Old 09-17-2017, 12:08 PM
 
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The article does point out that these are very, very elite private hs schools where there are 15 kids per class and teachers only carry 4 caseloads. As an elementary school teacher -- it's very time consuming for me to write 25 or 30 comments each grading period for my students -- i can't imagine doing that with a public hs student load.
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Old 09-17-2017, 10:00 PM
 
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I couldn't get the article to open, but I have long felt that the A-F system is a little inconsistent. In some schools an A on a test is 90-100% correct, other schools is 94% correct, which is a lot harder to achieve. And A-F trades also seem to be looked at as rewards or punishments instead of merely a reporting of student progress.


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Old 09-24-2017, 02:47 PM
 
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We've done standards-based report cards for years, which is not exactly what they're talking about here, but similar, I think. The child gets a 1-4 rating on every single grade level standard. The pros are that it actually shows what the child has mastered rather than grading compliance like traditional grading systems often do (such as giving points for things like turning in homework, participating in class, etc. that can inflate the grade) and that it's more detailed about what a child really can and can't do. The cons are that it's a lot more work on teachers, parents don't really understand it, and older kids that might traditionally be motivated by getting a good grade aren't really motivated by this system. It's also difficult when certain standards aren't really introduced until later in the year, but you're required to report out on progress starting at the end of the first quarter. This really contributes to the parents not understanding it.

I also have no idea how this works in the high school (or if they even do things the same way we do in elementary) because the kids need a GPA for college. I know the article mentioned they'd reached out to colleges to make sure their system was accepted, but I think it's a totally different thing for an elite private school to do that and a public school to do that. I have a feeling that if a random public high school reached out to colleges about a new system, they'd simply be ignored. Even if the college were willing to accept a student without a GPA, scholarships often have GPA requirements. Obviously students attending elite private schools have the money to pay for college without scholarships, so that may not be a primary concern for them.
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