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mommysubs mommysubs is offline
 
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mommysubs
 
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Preschool Ideas for Home
Old 08-29-2017, 08:35 PM
 
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I am a parent looking for ideas on getting my kids ready for kindergarten. Unfortunately, our district (which also has the highest school taxes in the area) only has preschool available to those who can afford a hefty price tag so I made the decision to "homeschool preschool". Wondering if any of you talented teachers have any ideas you would like to share that would help me prepare my 4 year olds for school? I have one who is stronger in writing and one who's strength is letter sounds and beginning to read. Need to work on getting the reader to write and the writer to pair letters with sounds. How can I make it fun for each to explore their "less favorite" areas? The more fun, the better!!!


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Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
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Preschool Reading/Writing Games
Old 08-30-2017, 02:03 AM
 
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If you have some of those magnetic letters, choose a few that form a simple word, and hide them around the playroom. The kids work together (with you "coaching") to find the letters, sound them out into a word, and copy it in their "word detective notebooks".

For the one who doesn't like to write, practice writing with a finger in a tray of sand/salt/whatever. My son loved this, and would even use it to practice spelling words long after he could print.
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Old 08-30-2017, 07:53 PM
 
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Wow! I really like these ideas!! Thank you! I especially can't wait to try the writing one for my reluctant scribe! My reader is able to get through the simple "Beginning-to-Read Books" by Margaret Hillert on his own. Just very basic and easy little books which makes them perfect! And my writer has been gaining confidence from following along with those books too---he is getting excited to pick out words he has learned from larger bodies of text. Thanks again for the ideas and if you have any more, please share! I am really excited to be able to teach them the basics right here at home, and I hope by the time they go into kindergarten next fall they will be confident and more than ready!
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Some great websites
Old 09-03-2017, 04:51 AM
 
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Here are two websites by pre-k teachers with lots of great activities:

https://www.prekinders.com

www.pre-kpages.com
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Thank you!
Old 09-04-2017, 05:19 AM
 
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Thanks for the links!! I will check them out!


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Don't push the academics too much
Old 10-08-2017, 05:03 PM
 
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While I understand that you want them to be able to write a little, read simple phonetic books if this is a requirement for next year, I don't understand how the district can expect children to start school with these skills if they don't provide the classes.

However, remember that many of the preschool activities that prepare children for reading, writing and maths may appear to have nothing to do with reading, writing, or maths.
- when you are tidying away the laundry, cutlery or toys, you are doing Maths / sorting and classifying - have them help you with those jobs. Take opportunities to point out things that are bigger, smaller, fatter, thinner, taller, shorter, longer, shorter etc Many children use bigger for taller, fatter, wider etc. Teach them the correct terminology. Help them gain a sense of time by talking about when you do things. On Mondays we go to the library. On Tuesdays we go swimming etc. Talk about morning, afternoon, evening, today, tomorrow etc. A sense of space and place is important.Talk about where things are (on the top shelf/ in the bottom drawer, beside the clock, rather than 'over there'.
Cooking provides lots of maths.
Drawing and painting with a range of tools - paintbrushes, cotton buds, chalk, oil pastels, thick crayons, thin crayons, markers, whiteboard markers (and then rub out the line, number, letter or whatever with your finger, tracing the letter again that way.

If you are teaching them to write letters, find out which font the school uses - do they teach the letters with 'tails' or not?

Perhaps your reluctant writer is reluctant to write because he doesn't yet have the strength or dexterity in his fingers to hold and control a pencil. Some of the activities I provide in my preschool class which help to develop fine motor skills and hand / finger strength and dexterity are -
- clothes pegs: Simply use them to help peg socks on the line
: Provide red, blue and yellow pegs, and red, blue and yellow bowls - the child pegs the clothespegs on the appropriate colour bowl. Or peg them all in a line in a pattern - first an AB pattern using two colours, then provide more colours, and work on making ABC patterns, AAB, and more. In each case there should be a progression 1. You model the pattern and together you describe it (red, blue, red, blue, red, blue.... etc 2. The child copies the pattern. 3. You start, and the child continues the pattern 4. the child invents his own pattern. (bonus - you are working on Maths as well as fine motor skills. If eh recognises numerals, place a numeral card in each bowl, he puts the appropriate number of pegs on that bowl.

- sponges :using a sponge, transfer water from one bowl to another. (or just play with the sponges in the bath!

- droppers: Use a dropper to transfer water from one bowl to another. Start with large droppers, then move to smaller ones. If you can get one of those soap 'dishes' that have little suction cups on them, a great activity is to ask the child to put one drop of water on each suction cup - this requires a great deal of control and concentration.

- tweezers and tongs - different sizes to move things around with.

- tearing paper of different consistencies. use the bits for collages later.

- paint with water on the ground outside, suing large brushes, then smaller

- beads for threading. not too expensive and if you find them in different shapes you can sort them by size, colour etc as well.

- nuts and bolts - lots of fun screwing and unscrewing, while developing muscle strength. samer can be done with jars and lids of different sizes.



As for reading - letter sounds are important but only a small part of learning to read.
some activities I use
- have some props available to help children retell a story.
- a puppet theatre ( at home you could turn a small table on it's side. or put two chairs together with the front part touching so the seat of the chair is the 'stage', if that makes sense. Children need to be able to retell a story, to say what happened first, next, last. They need to be able to think about the story - who did what?, why?, what will happen next?, what would happen if.....? you can develop these skills as you go about your daily life, no need for a specific lesson. Talk about what you will do after breakfast, before lunch etc

An important part of learning is to be able to take a risk, have a go, make a mistake: This needs to be modelled. - if you make a mistake, admit it, fix it, apologise if necessary. It is not a problem if you spill some water - that is an accident (usually!!!), it happens. But what do you do next? It is not OK to leave it there. You get a cloth and wipe it up. (Ie the child, if the child spilt it). You as the adult may need to re-wipe later, you may need to rewash something the child has washed, out of his sight, but he learns that it is OK to make a mistake/ have an accident, but it is important to try to fix it.
Provide opportunities for your children to try new things, show that you too can try new things, even if they appear challenging. Help them to accept that the first attempt will not usually be perfect, and that is OK. One's best effort is all that is needed.

Listening skills and being able to follow directions are important. Take them to child appropriate shows, maybe storytime at the library, and help them learn how to be a good audience. Listening is an important skills and they may be expected to listen for an extended period at school. Show how to listen - look at the speaker, hands, feet and mouth quiet.

Pairing letters with sounds - one thing I have done is to make a collection of items that begin with each sound. You need a small tub for each letter sound, labelled with the letter. Eg b might have a ball, a balloon, a toy bike, a tiny banana, etc. You can use pictures, but concrete objects are better and are more fun. as you build up your collection, have the boys help you. Do not necessarily go in ABC order. In fact, I think I would start with whichever sound you have lots of items for - place the items around the room. Take out the box, and point out that it says 'b' but it is empty. Lets find things that begin with 'b' to put in it. With prompting if necessary,have them collect the items and place them in the jar/tub. There should be one or two items on the table that do not begin with 'b'. you pick up the sandwich, say 'Ssssandwich, this does not begin with b. We need another tub for things that begin with s.
Gradually the tubs get filled up. As a lesson you might take out two or more tubs, depending on the boys' readiness, pour all the items onto the table, and sort them back into their tubs.

You could also make a scrapbook / picture dictionary where they stick pictures that begin with each letter. But I prefer the objects for several reasons
- you can use them and practise over an over again, whereas with the book, once it is stuck in, there is no more learning. Does the child say that sandwich begins withs because he hears the s or because he know it is on the s page?


I've gone past what you asked. I hope some of it is of use, and if not to you, to other readers.
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Love This!
Old 10-10-2017, 05:07 AM
 
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Thank you so much for all of these wonderful ideas!!!!! I like the scavenger hunt idea for the objects that start with a certain letter. And I do agree...much of the English language makes zero phonetic sense as there are many "exceptions" in silent letters, borrowed sounds, etc. I guess just reading alot can't hurt!
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