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KTeach859
 
 
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Student with extreme attention & impulse issues
Old 10-15-2017, 10:46 AM
 
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I have a student on my caseload that is currently OHI and receives OT and PT in Kindergarten. He has good language and vocabulary, and great academic skills, but was born premature and due to lots of medical needs has very stunted growth.

His parents are very concerned about his attention & impulse control, and frankly I've never seen anything like it. You can literally say "go put this in your backpack" and he'll hold the paper, walk a few feet & completely forget what he's suppose to be doing. When he's sitting at the table to work, again he'll work for a few seconds, then walk away and go get things off the shelves, touch things on the teacher's desk, turn the projector on, etc.. He's in movement every second of the day. He never stops.

He has no idea that what he's doing isn't ok. We've tried reward systems, time outs, etc.. and he just says "sorry" and goes back to doing whatever it was that he shouldn't be doing. His mom said even at home he tries to touch the oven, walks outside into the street, tries to get inside the fireplace, etc.. with no understanding that he shouldn't be doing those things.

Any ideas?? It's getting so extreme that I don't know how to help him or the teacher anymore. Nothing is working, and it almost seems like some kind of medical issue instead of social/behavioral.


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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 10-15-2017, 12:12 PM
 
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I've had students like this before. The only thing I've seen truly work is ADHD medication. I have seen many a student make a complete turnaround with meds. It is unfortunate that many are so against it. At my school we are allowed to talk to parents about medication (in another school I worked in, we could NEVER do this, so check your policies). At the very least, perhaps you can say something like, "Have you talked to your pediatrician about these issues?" (again, check policies).
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Old 10-15-2017, 12:33 PM
 
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Yes, he is definitely what I would consider to be the perfect candidate for medication. My district doesn't allow us to talk to parents about this, and we have to be really careful about how we recommend a parent to talk to the dr. I did suggest the parent being her concerns up the dr at the child's next physical...hoping the dr will say it instead
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ElemSped13 ElemSped13 is offline
 
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Old 10-15-2017, 03:11 PM
 
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Can you do pictures or use a whiteboard to give him a visual for what he is supposed to be doing?

We are just allowed to tell parents to check with the ped when they have concerns. If a parent brings meds up in conversation, we might say well if they needed glasses, you'd get those, right? I understand not wanting to medicate kids but sometimes you really need to.

I had a 5th grader with similar short attention span and was so happy when he transferred schools! He was unpredictable and got violent once, so stressful.
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Old 10-15-2017, 05:53 PM
 
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He has a visual schedule of his day, and can very plainly read it and say "it's time to sit for reading", "it's time to walk to lunch" etc... but then can't follow through with it. We've tried just having him hold 1 visual card, like a picture of his desk, to show him what he should be doing, and he'll carry it over to the teachers desk and then start typing on her computer.

It's maddening. Thankfully there aren't any aggressive behaviors, but it does severely effect his social skills.


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