Will Not Talking - ProTeacher Community


Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Classroom Management

Will Not Talking

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
SisisI
 
 
Guest

SisisI
 
 
Guest
Will Not Talking
Old 10-16-2017, 02:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Help! My class at the end of the day (9th grade) will not stop talking out of turn. Some of what they blurt out is off topic but most of the time it has to do with what we are talking about. I feel like that they are so desperate to be heard that they constantly talk over me and one another.

I appreciate any tips on helping them talk in turn, logical consequences for this behavior, and ways to help manage it.

Thanks a bunch!


  Reply With Quote

cattleya cattleya is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2017
Posts: 36
Junior Member

cattleya
 
Joined: Oct 2017
Posts: 36
Junior Member
Talking is one of the communication skills.
Old 10-18-2017, 11:33 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Possibly use this as an advantage and not a detriment? You did say that they kept on-topic most of the time.

Perhaps you could allow them some free "discussion time" without moderation, and you could be a listener, and bring up good points that you happen to hear while walking through the rows of seats, or offer some yourself, as well as observations, pros and cons, and other higher level learning goals, and so on. In my teacher training courses, we were told that often the students can (and should) explore a topic without the strict management of a teacher. Possibly put them in groups and give them a goal with one student per table acting as a secretary.

I feel that if you spot, and announce a good idea, then more of the kids will want to be singled out as having "good ideas." It would be something like the business world, and brainstorming. (A good idea of the day reward?) These are situations that will happen to them in the real world, at the job, in civic groups, and so on-- they need practice talking about real events, current news, and topics like science.

I was told that you brainstorm quickly, without thinking, really and that there are no "bad" ideas.

So, for instance, "What if what we call a Market Economy is really a fiction?" (based on the economic writing of Ha Joon Chang). How can this statement be supported/disproven?

By the way, I offered this because, at 9th grade, they really should not need to be as quiet as a mouse and passively accept education. Many of the things taught in school at this grade level are beginning to be less black/white, and more gray.
cattleya is offline   Reply With Quote
Fenwick Fenwick is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 337
Full Member

Fenwick
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 337
Full Member

Old 10-19-2017, 09:33 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

There's nothing appropriate about students calling out whether on topic or not, exception being you have instructed them to call out. It's a form of academic bullying - fastest and loudest intimidate the shy and less confident. Some teachers during the teaching of rules and procedures early in the year "go over" raising hand before speaking. Often though, in the moment of truth, when a student blurts out with a good idea, and the teacher doesn't want to interrupt the flow of the lesson, the blurt out is ignored. Students, however, deal with reality. What they just witnessed was a student breaking a rule and nothing happened. The teacher's rules are hot air. And if one student can get away with it why not others? Dominoes start to fall.

First thing to consider is it worth your time to do anything about a call out? Be honest. If you are not prepared to deal with every call out, every time and any where do not make a rule about raising hand or taking turns. There's no such thing as consistent "most of the time". If you are prepared do not wait for a call out. Start your lesson with a review lesson on raising hand and wait to be called on before speaking. Make sure to emphasize the "wait to be called on" part as some students will raise hand and call out simultaneously then justify, "Well you just said we had to raise our hand. That's what I did!" Do some modeling and role playing.

Start your lesson. Do not be shocked if within seconds a student calls out. Testing your rules is a right of passage. This is the moment of truth. What's more important, instruction or discipline? If you choose instruction you might as well give the room to the students. The lesson should come to a screeching halt. Your "presence" should say "This lesson is not going to continue until that behavior stops." Presence is signaled through body language - how you move. Quick turns, quick steps, quick gestures all signal a person losing control. Idea is to move, turn slowly and refrain from gesturing. Avoid public reprimands. Act don't talk.

If call outs are coming from more than a couple students abandon your lesson and reteach raising hand. If it's 1-3 students use whatever discipline consequence you feel is appropriate. Perhaps some worksheets prepared in advance given to each student which takes them out of any chance to participate. In any event, the message should be "I mean what I say".
Fenwick is offline   Reply With Quote
MathWA's Avatar
MathWA MathWA is online now
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,794
Senior Member

MathWA
 
MathWA's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,794
Senior Member

Old 10-19-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Bravo Fenwick - you nailed it! A teachers presence sets the tone for the classroom. My motto was “Walk into a room like you own it”. Well said Fenwick!
MathWA is online now   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Classroom Management
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:25 PM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net