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rosieteaches rosieteaches is offline
 
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Blatant Disrespect
Old 10-11-2017, 03:25 PM
 
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Teacher at front, managing class with instruction and coaching, pauses.

Fourth grade student, seated at front because he seeks negative attention often, begins his quest to entertain classmates--turned in seat, dancing, clapping, and looking for someone to partake in his game. Classmates do a great job ignoring.

How does teacher (me) react to this blatant disrespect? I moved him to back of room but trust this behavior will become a favorite for getting attention from his classmates. Need workable strategies to help me manage this as we move along this year. Thanks for insight.


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Old 10-11-2017, 03:35 PM
 
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I have started sending the student with independent work to complete by himself in the office where no one is to interact with him. So if we're doing a class discussion of something we read, I send him with the questions I am planning to ask the class, and he has to write answers. We'll see if this works long term, but so far so good.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:38 PM
 
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I send to my team mate's room.
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A Different Approach
Old 10-19-2017, 12:29 AM
 
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I would take this student aside first thing tomorrow morning and tell him that you've selected him to be your special helper in class. Tell him that he was selected because you feel that he is responsible and trustworthy. You can even present him with a special badge if you like! His job can be anything that will keep him busy during your instruction and coaching: using a pointer to point to images on the screen as you are teaching; passing out materials, helping to operate your computer or other technology, etc. I've used this approach successfully with a number of students who seemed to crave attention.
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:00 AM
 
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Rosie - this boy is acting out because he can. Have you tried consequences for his circus show? He needs to learn a life lesson that there are consequences for his negative behavior. Decide what the consequence will be and dont go easy on him. Missing recess the first time and it doubles if it happens again? Eating lunch with little kids? It has to be something that he really doesnt want so he decides that its a much better option to behave. Then have, what I use to call, a come to Jesus meeting with him. Explain very firmly what will happen if he pipes up again. Then you absolutely must follow through if needed. If he decides to stop this ridiculous side show then quietly praise him many times over so he eventually wants to do what you want him to do. This comes with mutual respect and was my fav time of teaching. Good luck!


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great advice
Old 10-23-2017, 08:07 AM
 
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I did have a great week last week letting his friends know that they'd be my helpers as we help him problem solve this behavior during recess time. His friends ignored each invitation to be distracted. They didn't want to lose recess so the problem largely disappeared. Thanks for your insight, it was a very practical approach toward correcting his behavior.
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