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TeachNFriend TeachNFriend is offline
 
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ODD in the classroom
Old 11-04-2017, 07:24 AM
 
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I have a student this year who is more difficult than any student Iíve ever worked with. He has a diagnosis of ODD. He flies off the handle over the smallest things and can get aggressive towards both staff and students. He goes from 0-60 in a split second. He shows no remorse after the fact and will not accept accountability for his actions. Iím at my wits end. He wants his needs to be catered to at all times and when given 2 options, heíll create a third choice just so he doesnít need to comply.

What do I do with this kid ?!?!

Anyone used an intervention that has worked with ODD?


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Old 11-04-2017, 07:47 AM
 
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I've had two, one of which is in my classroom this year. It is so hard, and I think it's important to remember that we can't "fix" these kids. We can only look for strategies to give them. Every kid is totally different, so I have no idea if this will help, but my child has recently been successful with a "chill zone". When he's flying off the handle, he goes into a cool down zone (a special spot marked in a more isolated place in the room - by my desk) and he squeezes a squishy ball until he has calmed down. Now, that didn't work until a few weeks ago and it doesn't always work, but it is helping now.

My child has some additional things going on, so I don't know if this will really help ODD, but we have built breaks into his schedule. He has a few set types of breaks to choose from and can take them at a scheduled time. I think this has helped his world seem less overwhelming and he feels more in control when he gets to choose his break. Again, it doesn't help everyday, but it does help maybe half the time and I'll take that!

Good luck! I know it can feel so overwhelming.
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Old 11-04-2017, 07:57 AM
 
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I've written a bunch about it.

First toss out whatever would work on a usual frequent flyer. It will not work.

1. Never EVER let this kid see you fuming upset. If the kid sees that, you are done. Channel your inner Spock. Pray to Mother Mary for peace, offer up a prayer to God. Any hint of emotion is fuel to the out of control ODD bonfire.

2. Choices. You give them choices, but load the choices. Kids starts flaming out..

-You can do your work, sit here quietly or go to *whereever* (I had Recharge Island)

-BLAH BLAH BLAH BAH BS and tears

-Repeat your above statement as emotionless as humanly possible. I know you want to throttle him, but this kid is invested on control. "If you feel out of control, go to Recharge Island. Come back when you feel ready." Try to spin the sentences that let the kid think he's moving the chess pieces.

If the kid sits at his desk, and keeps his hands to himself and mouth shut #WINNING.

I would tell the kid, "I need a consultantion with you." I never said *meeting* or *talk*. Consultation gave the feel of equal partners (in reality it was NOT).

You gotta be a detective. What is setting this kid off? Transitions? Are other kids triggering him for sh*ts and giggles? (I saw this ALOT. It can be really subtle.)

For me, all my ODD kids meltdowns were a crabby day in the regular class room (I taught art), transition to my classroom, and classmates being sleathy jerks. I was absolutely not allowed to send anyone to the office unless blood was involved.

This kid does want to be liked. For whatever reason (issues emotional regulation/insert reason here) he can't. ODD behavioris fueled by control. The one kid I had, I could have smashed his hands, pulled out his finger nails, and he'd probably spit in my face and say "Is that all you got?"

Last thing, when cherub finally gets with the program, DO NOT call out his good behavior. That is when he'll round house kick another kid in the head. I used to use thumbs up or a Postit Note with a happy cartoon character I drew, and nonchalantly put it on the desk or the work.

I would also give little bonus jobs for good behavior. High five good job was never spoken out loud.

Remember as bad as you get it at school, this kid is 1000x worse at home. It's not like he's saving it up all for you.

I never had a clip chart, stickers or upfront reward system ever work with an ODD kid.

Good luck!
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Old 11-04-2017, 07:58 AM
 
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Given my choice of diagnoses, I'd pick anything over ODD. I am so sorry. I've not found anything that works consistently.
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Old 11-04-2017, 08:20 AM
 
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I have had two first graders with that diagnosis and the only strategy that saved the school year for all the other children was to use my hard earned contractual right to suspend from the classroom for the day.
When these kids were in class (separate years thank goodness) I always went out of my way to give them extra time to let them know I care about them. One student willingly stayed after school with a group of my students to work on reading skills. This gave him some happiness in his life. I found that the small class size helped a great deal.

Both of these students needed an adult who would remain neutral and calm during outbursts of anger. Their parents had no idea how to handle them.


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Old 11-04-2017, 09:22 AM
 
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I have one ODD (albeit medicated) student this year. I have a behavior plan I can share with you that has helped. I am not a fan of behavior plans with rewards built in, but our school is, so...we use them.

We also use the Zones of Regulation and teach all students to know which "zone" they are in as well as what strategies they can use to get back to green. This helps, too. It's very simple to implement. The kids totally get it and use it, knowing their goal is to figure out what they need to get back to green (and able to learn).

Let me know if you need more information on either of what we use as a school.
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Medicated...most of the time
Old 11-04-2017, 09:55 AM
 
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My little guy is usually medicated, but once in a while it seems like he either didnít get a full dose or its wearing off. Those are the days we have aggression. He punches adults and children alike. We have a behaviour plan for him but itís not effective. I feel like we donít have enough proactive supports for him.

We use Zones as well but he goes from green to red so fast he canít catch himself. It seems like he isnít even able to identify his own triggers.

He wonít let himself be liked and keeps everyone at arms length most of the time. Super frustrating!
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Odd
Old 11-04-2017, 10:10 AM
 
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The hardest to work with. Always remember they have next to no control over it. Try to find a few triggers. Give him a hiding place to calm down.

I discovered mine loved to draw. I discovered Monart that builds behavior into the process. It helped a lot. Eventually though, I had to fight for a one on one aid, which he got for only half the day. That let me get some teaching done.

Child was eventually placed in a therapeutic environment and put on meds. He came back to visit two years later and he was a changed for the better child.
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Old 11-04-2017, 10:14 AM
 
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After reading your post again,I am going to add that perhaps this child has Conduct Disorder due to his aggression with peers. This child and family needs extensive intervention with counseling services regardless of the diagnosis.
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Counseling
Old 11-04-2017, 10:38 AM
 
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I believe he needs more than our school can provide for him. We are suggesting counseling to the parents but itís entirely up to them if they will pursue it. In the meantime I feel like we need some good tier 2 behaviour interventions to set him up with, but what?


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Old 11-04-2017, 10:40 AM
 
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If he has a behavior disorder Tier 2 behavior interventions with a counselor would be best. Is there one available in the district?

here is a partial list of behavior interventions;you may have already tried these but at least you have some of your efforts to document

http://polkdhsd7.sharpschool.com/sta..._interventions
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Old 11-04-2017, 10:02 PM
 
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One of my favorite kids is an ODD kid.

At first he tried to balk everything, but I don't ruffle easily. I am very routine oriented and have specific expectations, but I know when to back off. Kids have assigned seats, he sits in the floor. No problem. I give a multiple choice test on Gradecam, he writes the answers long-hand on paper. No problem.

He has major anxiety issues, and when he feels backed in a corner, he acts out. Otherwise, he does not seek attention. His mom is supportive and has him in counseling. That helps a lot.

The other ODD kid I had in recent years was a jerk. When the dad came in to discuss behavior and work, it was obvious that the apple did not fall far from the tree. Kid wanted everything his way, and he was very attention-seeking.
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Thanks
Old 11-05-2017, 04:54 PM
 
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I checked out the tier 2 interventions and weíve tried quite a few already, but we havenít tried behaviour contracts. I will check with P and see what she thinks.

I appreciate all of your thoughts and comments. This will be a very long year if we canít get this figured out. Heís already attacked me twice and punched his previous teachers several times. Ugh 😑 I hate to say this but heís a bit of a menace.
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I have a son with ODD.
Old 11-06-2017, 10:20 AM
 
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And ADHD, and autism, and a mood disorder.

I second everything Tawaki said.
The things that are suggested are the things that worked for my son.

I would stress a couple of points:
It's all about control. Give him SOMETHING he can control.
Don't get pulled into a power struggle. Don't get emotional. Period.

Is there someone, maybe another teacher, maybe a different staff member - even the maintenance person, who this student has a rapport with? If so, see if they can be sort of a mentor. My son was in 4th and 5th grade, but had a great rapport with his teacher from 1st/2nd. He had a behavior plan, would meet with her (very) briefly in the morning, they would discuss a goal for the day, then he would meet with her in the afternoon for sort of a "debriefing". This work EXTREMELY well.
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