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Help! I have a class of almost all boys!

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NHHStephanie NHHStephanie is offline
 
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Help! I have a class of almost all boys!
Old 11-15-2017, 04:01 PM
 
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Hello--This year my 3-4 year old class has been so difficult. I have 10 students total and 7 of those students are boys who are full of energy and all close family friends from church. I have been teaching for years, most of those years was in 1st grade, but have never experienced this kind of behavior. They act aggressively towards each other , get one another "riled" up, and often bicker/compete for attention. I have tried lots of techniques like bringing in more adult helpers, doing shorter activities for their attention span, separating the boys into different groups, etc. but each technique only works for a short period of time. I think I narrowed it down to me having a hard time adapting myself to the younger aged kids. I feel like a fish out of water because classroom management was never a problem when I was teaching 1st.

I would love some guidance on what to do. Can you send me blogs, articles, books, etc, that has helped you with this age group? I would love any resources that you have found helpful!

Thanks in advance for your help!


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RealisticPreK RealisticPreK is offline
 
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Old 12-16-2017, 01:41 PM
 
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I have 6 boys myself in the same age range.

I use heidisongs CDs ($15 each) for teaching letters and sounds, numbers and shapes and later on some easy sight words.

Here's the link:

https://www.heidisongs.com/

My boys love the sensory tables (I have a water table for 2, and a table that has oatmeal in it or coffee -- 2 cans--you have to resign yourself to cleaning up the mess daily).

I have one boy who is quite aggressive. When I found out another boy went home often and complained about him I decided I had to get the aggressive one to stop. So he has to hold my hand the minute I spot him hitting a peer in the yard or anywhere else.

Another technique I use is I will ask an offender (for any offense) if he would like to practice correct behavior while everyone else is in the yard playing??? All it takes is one time 'practicing' for 3-4 minutes during recess to smarten a child up. Once they find out what it means to 'practice', believe me, they straighten up.

PM me if you have any other questions and I'll see if I can help.
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Gimet Gimet is offline
 
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Old 12-16-2017, 10:55 PM
 
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As a ECSE teacher, I had several years with all boy classes. I think it's really important to have a consistent structure and routine with clearly defined expectations and consequences. Once this is established you can ease up. It's amazing to see them start Circle Time on their own when the schedule/ routine has been established and they are comfortable in the setting. Best wishes. This is a great place to ask for help, ideas, and support!
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findinggiggle findinggiggle is offline
 
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Raising Boys
Old 12-19-2017, 05:32 PM
 
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Hi,
Last year, I has a similar atmosphere with lots of busy body boys. The play became more destructive or hurtful play if the energy was not refocused in a constructive way. So I started adding more sensory into their daily play with play dough, concoction time, water table, sand table, water beads, ooblek or anything else I could come up with. Whenever the energy was starting to edge toward out of control (or before), I would through one of these sensory projects on the table or in several bins. Sensory Time typically happened every time there was a transition (finishing up snack time, free play and toiletting time...) or when we were in one space for a length of time. Try to change out the projects if you try this approach as playdough can only be played with so many time before it gets boring.

Raising Cain is a helpful book. One extremely useful technique is "Push Play". Children need the rough and tumble play especially boys. Push play is a controlled rough and tumble play with teacher supervision. This is one you might need to ask permission from the principal or director but super worth it. You lay down a inch thick mat (gym mat). Two children play at a time for five seconds then new students play. Each child puts up their arms, palms out, fingers closed then touch hands to other persons hands. Palms to Palms. A teacher does the push play with a willing child to demonstrate for a couple of the times. The objective is to push with only your hands to push the other person off the mat or until they fall down. They only do this for five seconds and a teacher is right there watching. You can guide the play to what is comfortable to you as sometimes they end up in a little tumble play. You would explain the rules before they start, like "say stop if you don't want to play anymore" and "you get to play for five seconds then other students get to push play".
I hope this helps!
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Boys are a different animal!
Old 02-14-2018, 07:42 AM
 
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Hello! I definitely feel your pain. I personally have three boys ages 5 and under, and oh man they are full of energy. I have also had classes that were majority boys and I definitely had to adjust my teaching style. First of all 3-4 year olds are very active, and boys that age EVEN MORE SO. They seems to never run out of fuel do they??

Some things I think would help you are remembering that boys are going to move whether you want them to or not, so you might as well channel their movement. I would suggest incorporating as many songs and movement activities that you can. Get their energy out. I hate to compare them to puppies, but really they are similar in that if they aren't able to get their energy out they start chewing on things or getting into trouble! Haha! I can personally attest to this!

Incorporating brain break type activities where they are singing learning songs and getting to move safely is a great place to start. Also, getting them OUTSIDE is huge. I find the that the more time they spend outside, the calmer they were. Something about the sunlight, fresh air, just took their aggressiveness down a notch. So if you are having a particularly rough day, just stop what you are doing and finish your activity outside. It's worth a shot.

Also there is a book called Wired to Move that is all about the differences in teaching boys versus girls. You can find that book on Amazon. I hope this helps! Good luck!


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