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Old 12-28-2017, 07:03 PM
 
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I totally agree with you about qualifying students. It takes an act of God to qualify.
Also agree with the "pacing guide." Don't we know when our students are ready to move on? But, no, the post-assessment scores are due so we have to trudge through. Pre-assessment scores are due directly after...

One part that stuck out to me is when the students said they wish they had had more individual help. I honestly wish I could give students more individual help. With 30 students in my class fifth grade class, it is truly difficult. All of the kindergarten classes at my school have at least 27 students. How are they possibly getting the help they need? If politicians could do one thing to help- they could lower class sizes!


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Old 12-28-2017, 08:56 PM
 
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It is an ad for the teacher blaming mindset and an ad for restorative justice. NEA has very little interest in listening to the teachers on the frontline. They take your money and continue to justify their jobs by writing fictional articles on what teachers should do next in order to "fix our schools."
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NEA article-thoughts?
Old 12-29-2017, 01:58 PM
 
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I just read this article in NEA Today about students who dropped out.

For some reason Iím really disturbed. I found it to be a lot of teacher blaming when teachers have very little control. Personally, I can take kids to team for SpEd services, but I donít have the final say in qualifying them (and we NEVER qualify them these days), Parents should have more control than we do and politicians and admin are controlling more and more about what happens in our room. Even if kids donít understand something, my pacing guide may force me to move on.

Thoughts?

http://neatoday.org/2017/12/19/why-s...ul0XHE.twitter
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Old 12-30-2017, 06:43 AM
 
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I like and agree with this section of the article:

Quote:
Educators can also reassess homework policies. If you donít understand how to balance an equation after finishing chapter 6 and move on to the next chapter, you canít build on balancing that equation. Assignments keep moving forward, but you canít do your assignments because you donít understand the problems, so your homework gets a zero and that brings your grade down. We need to recognize that homework is not that critical an element of learning, and some students might not have a home environment where they can effectively do their homework. Carve out time in class to do it, and think about groupings of students who can help each other.
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Old 12-30-2017, 11:59 AM
 
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I agree with PP about restorative justice and class size.

My school had a specific plans for teachers to really, truly get to know their homeroom students.

But our homeroom classes are packed with at times 30 kids. It is a challenge to get attendance taken, never mind doing restorative circles and connecting with each student.

And something I have found myself saying over and over again in my 4.5 years as a full-time teacher - I am teacher not a psych nurse.

You can't underfund or not fund supportive services like social workers and counselors and just expect teachers to pick up the slack.

Some teachers do have a gift for connecting, but they will be the first to tell you their classroom instruction suffers.

Don't get me started on the young adults I have met and worked with who think they don't have to show up to jobs on time or listen to a boss because the boss "doesn't have a relationship with me."

Sorry, struck a nerve.


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Old 12-31-2017, 11:02 AM
 
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"The through line in many of their stories was some kind of academic challenge that undermined their faith in themselves as learners, that then led to helplessness and hopelessness about their ability to be a student, which was their primary job in life."

Many times it is comments or non-verbal indicates by the teacher to a student who isn't doing well that they are failures rather than they failed at something. The worse the problem with the student gets the more pile on there is until the student is blamed for the failures and it is a character flaw rather than struggles in either academic or emotional/behavioral development. Previous schooling didn't care that much about the end result. Kids dropped out all of the time. Things are different now, so we can't just ignore where students lag.
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