Single and small serving containers - ProTeacher Community


Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Teachers' Lounge


Single and small serving containers

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Sprite's Avatar
Sprite Sprite is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member

Sprite
 
Sprite's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member
Single and small serving containers
Old 01-03-2018, 11:17 AM
  #1

I am planning on doing a big batch of freezing food. Does anyone freeze in plastic containers? What about ziplock bags? What about ramekins? I don't know much about freezing food. Anyone freeze a lot of things and have advice? How do you defrost? Can you just take something that is in a ramekin and then put it in the oven for a longer time?


Sprite is offline   Reply With Quote

kerrysgirl's Avatar
kerrysgirl kerrysgirl is offline
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 2,349
Senior Member

kerrysgirl
 
kerrysgirl's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 2,349
Senior Member
Freezing advice--
Old 01-03-2018, 11:29 AM
  #2

I've frozen in all of those things!

If you freeze in glass/ceramic, I've found it best to thaw in the fridge, then put it in a cold oven. This way, there's no huge temp difference that would cause your glass/ceramic to break.

Plastic baggies work well to freeze almost everything. You can stack your unfrozen things on a cookie sheet in a stack to get them flat, then freeze. They take up lots less space. The problem is getting them out of the baggies sometimes. I have to cut them open with scissors and get them in a pan to cook. My 8X8 square pan works well for this. So does my 9X13. Mine are glass, so they can go straight to the oven or microwave.

Plastic works, too. I just usually defrost on the defrost setting of my microwave and go from there.

It really IS economical if you can get things frozen ahead of time. I like to make a casserole (I double the recipe), and then I make one to eat and one to freeze. Mostly, I cook them at the same time, cool the one going into the freezer, then refrigerate it overnight. Then, I put it in the freezer. I overwrap with foil and write the date on it.

Good luck!
kerrysgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
PoohBear's Avatar
PoohBear PoohBear is offline
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 7,168
Senior Member

PoohBear
 
PoohBear's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 7,168
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 11:35 AM
  #3

I use a Foodsaver, vacuum sealing makes the frozen food last a really long time!
PoohBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Renea's Avatar
Renea Renea is online now
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 10,230
Senior Member

Renea
 
Renea's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 10,230
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 11:58 AM
  #4

This is what we have done in the past.
Quote:
Plastic baggies work well to freeze almost everything. You can stack your unfrozen things on a cookie sheet in a stack to get them flat, then freeze. They take up lots less space. The problem is getting them out of the baggies sometimes. I have to cut them open with scissors and get them in a pan to cook. My 8X8 square pan works well for this.
DH just bought a vacuum sealing Foodsaver. We'll see how we like it. I don't think we really needed it.

We tend to freeze foods and then forget about using them. Hope we have better habits in the new year.
Renea is online now   Reply With Quote
crazy4catz's Avatar
crazy4catz crazy4catz is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,429
Senior Member

crazy4catz
 
crazy4catz's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,429
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 12:22 PM
  #5

I also use the tin pans and just put foil on them. You can get a good deal on them at Costco. I really need to do some. I used to do my version of Once a Month cooking. I would make less now that we don't have any kids at home.


crazy4catz is offline   Reply With Quote
PoohBear's Avatar
PoohBear PoohBear is offline
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 7,168
Senior Member

PoohBear
 
PoohBear's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 7,168
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 01:21 PM
  #6

Quote:
DH just bought a vacuum sealing Foodsaver. We'll see how we like it. I don't think we really needed it.
I didnít think weíd really use ours either but I love it now. Forgetting about frozen food isnít as much of an issue because it lasts so long, you can use it when you come across it again

My DH doesnít like the same food twice in a week so I just foodsave leftovers and when he gets the food again, itís like itís a new dinner
PoohBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Gromit's Avatar
Gromit Gromit is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,184
Senior Member

Gromit
 
Gromit's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,184
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 03:28 PM
  #7

Quote:
DH just bought a vacuum sealing Foodsaver. We'll see how we like it. I don't think we really needed it.

We tend to freeze foods and then forget about using them. Hope we have better habits in the new year.
I have had a Foodsaver since 2002, and it is my favorite kitchen gadget!

I've eaten Thanksgiving turkey in July because I froze and forgot. Once I realized you could literally have stuff frozen for months in a Foodsaver bag, I started batch cooking tons of meals in August to last all school year. I don't ONLY eat frozen food during the school year, but it's really nice to know that I always have *something* in the freezer if I don't want to cook or spend money out.

Quote:
Anyone freeze a lot of things and have advice? How do you defrost?
You can make boil in a bag reheatable meals with the Foodsaver! I make casseroles and enchiladas and lasagnas and vacuum seal a single or double portion. All I have to do is toss the frozen bag in a pot of water to quickly reheat without drying out.

Otherwise, I defrost in the fridge and reheat in the toaster oven or microwave depending on what it is.
Gromit is offline   Reply With Quote
Lottalove's Avatar
Lottalove Lottalove is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,304
Senior Member

Lottalove
 
Lottalove's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,304
Senior Member
I need to get better at this!
Old 01-03-2018, 05:40 PM
  #8

DH hates leftovers so lots of things go to waste here. If I froze them, I could reintroduce them later or take them to lunch.

One hint I have to add is to freeze things in muffin tins or ice cube trays for small portions. You can spray it with Pam spray or similar. Then put the portions in the trays. Once they are frozen, you can pop them out and wash the muffin tin or ice cube trays to use on something else.

I have used this for marinara and spaghetti sauces and gravies a lot. Pasta is easy enough to make that I rarely freeze that. Mini meatloaves are perfect in muffin tins, too.

Personally, I don't have good luck freezing potatoes. If you freeze pastas, like lasagna, you might want to cook it al dente first so that it leaves room for reheating without overcooking.
Lottalove is offline   Reply With Quote
giver1940 giver1940 is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,750
Senior Member

giver1940
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,750
Senior Member
If you freeze in containers,
Old 01-03-2018, 05:43 PM
  #9

not in bags, put plastic wrap on the top so it's touching the food, even under foil. It keeps the air out and prevents ice crystals from forming. Just remember to take it off before you put it in the oven.
giver1940 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sprite's Avatar
Sprite Sprite is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member

Sprite
 
Sprite's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member

Old 01-03-2018, 08:36 PM
  #10

Thanks for all of the tips. Seems like so many people use the foodsaver. I actually had one and never got the hang out it. We had to throw it out because it ended up growing LOTS of mold. I don't know if mine was a dud or if it was user error. My guess is user error...

I'm going to try to do some good cooking tomorrow or this weekend. I found a recipe for hunter's minestrone soup. MMM

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/t...recipe-1947500


Sprite is offline   Reply With Quote
Gromit's Avatar
Gromit Gromit is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,184
Senior Member

Gromit
 
Gromit's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,184
Senior Member

Old 01-03-2018, 08:55 PM
  #11

Quote:
We had to throw it out because it ended up growing LOTS of mold. I don't know if mine was a dud or if it was user error. My guess is user error...
If you seal juicy items, you have a few options:

1) Freeze briefly prior to sealing. This prevents the juices from being sucked up by the vacuum suction. I don't like this as much because I tend to forget that I'm freezing something and go back to seal it a day or two later, which means the food isn't as fresh later. But it's definitely easier than option 2 and I think it's the one most people use.

2) Thoroughly clean and dry the tray after every few bags that you seal. I take the tray out and wash it then dry with a paper towel. Then I run a dry paper towel all along the edges of the sealing channel.

3) Use some sort of barrier between the food and the seal to prevent the juices from being sucked up. I used to use a folded up paper towel just inside the edge. This is my least favorite option because then you have a paper towel in your bag. But some people like it.

That should prevent mold.
Gromit is offline   Reply With Quote
Sprite's Avatar
Sprite Sprite is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member

Sprite
 
Sprite's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 297
Full Member
Gromit, thank you.
Old 01-04-2018, 08:55 PM
  #12

Thanks Gromit, everything that I was trying to seal was liquid and I didn't do any of those things. That is why mine grew mold. I was definitely using it wrong.

I wonder if it is worth it to purchase another one. I had to toss ours.
Sprite is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Teachers' Lounge
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:42 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
11