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Quick! Need ways to spend grant $ to improve reading
Old 02-04-2018, 10:41 AM
 
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On Friday after school when I was getting ready to leave school for the weekend, my principal said that our school has a chance to get $65,000 over a three-year period. This money is a literacy grant that is to be used to help students improve their reading skills in grades K-5. A representative for the organization giving the grant is meeting with administrators on Monday morning to see what our school would do with the money. The principal wants ideas from me (Title I teacher) and the At-Risk reading teacher.

Of course, there is a time crunch and my mind is TOTALLY blank. That is why I come to YOU, PT! What ideas do you have on which to spend this $? Give me anything that comes to mind! Thanks!


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Old 02-04-2018, 11:10 AM
 
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Richard Allington - summer reading loss

His research shows that allowing students to self-select 10 books at the end of the school year that they get to keep, along with encouraging but not requiring some reflection (could be a reading log, summer get togethers to talk about and trade books, home visit from a teacher to talk about reading), cuts summer reading loss and actually shows gains beyond what students get from going to summer school.

With the $ you have available, you could have scholastic come out and set up a book fair for kids to shop from (they actually have a summer reading loss program that you could utilize), or you could purchase books and set up a book fair yourself. I run one at my school with annual funding and can run the program for 200 kids for about $5000 if I buy the books myself on Scholastic.

ETA: The first 2 years we did the program, we selected 1/2 of the students in K-2 to participate, then compared spring-fall reading data on both groups. Our data supporting the program was very compelling, which is why I am now able to include all of our K-2 students. I'd do more if we had more $ available.
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Old 02-04-2018, 01:14 PM
 
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I’d train teachers in Reading Recovery. That’s shown to be the one thing that improves students’ reading. When students in our district did RR, their reading improved as nothing else did.
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Summer again--and more
Old 02-04-2018, 01:25 PM
 
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I'm not sure exactly what they did, but for the past couple of years one day a month at our library a meeting room was being used by the local elementary schools. Kids were checking in with what they had been doing at home that month (I think it was math-focused, but why not reading).

Probably do reading logs. Maybe kids making posters and displays to recommend books to others. Book prizes for meeting goals. Or random drawings for all participants.

Much of the above could be done at school, maybe even with a family literacy night. Short speaker for parents about reading with kids and then set them loose in the school library or classrooms to browse with their kids to find the "perfect" book to borrow. Speaker could be a children's librarian from the public library (and help people sign up for library cards) or perhaps an author of children's books.

Purchase books and run a Reading is Fundamental program at the school.

Have grandparents, local government officials, etc. come in to read to and with children.
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Grant
Old 02-04-2018, 02:31 PM
 
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If you use any kind of leveled book program, lots and lots of books crossing all levels and genres. Take a look at Book Source.


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Thank you!
Old 02-05-2018, 08:08 AM
 
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Thanks for the ideas. I may be messaging you for more details. Your help is much appreciated!
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Iíd train teachers in Reading Recovery. Thatís shown to be the one thing that improves studentsí reading.
I agree 100%
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