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logical consequences
Old 10-10-2008, 03:39 PM
 
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What would you do for a logical consequence for hitting another child? Also, a different student, but throws temper tantrums? I don't know how to handle these situations with responsive classroom.


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Logical consequences
Old 10-11-2008, 12:24 PM
 
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are logical...

you break it, you fix it

apology of action

loss of priviledge

so... what makes sense if someone hits someone else? A letter, a card, a picture/drawing after a discussion about why it was inapproriate to hit another child. Also, if it is happeneing during a time when that child can loose a priviledge (working in a small group, sitting at circle time with the group) you could suspend that priviledge for a small amount of time.

As far as the tantrum... are you using the "take a break" chair or a Buddy Teacher to remove him/her from the room?
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Old 10-13-2008, 03:46 PM
 
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When a child hits another child, my consequence is that the hitter spends some time away from the group. I tell them that if they hit others, I can't be sure they are going to do it again, so they have to spend some time away. Sometimes I send them to a buddy teacher room, others I just have them sit and do their work separate in the room. I'm not sure responsive classroom would necessarily "agree" with me, but I take hitting very seriously in my classroom and I don't feel like having the child apologize via a note is enough to teach the child not to hit.
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The safety of your class
Old 10-18-2008, 06:34 AM
 
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is what Responsive Classroom would most want you to be concerned with. To insinuate that RC would allow for hitting and unsafe bahavior is misleading.

I'd say it depends on the severity and frequency of hitting. Last year I had what I called an "active slapper" who would assult children daily by slapping them in the face and other areas. Unfortunately, he spent time out of the room in a Buddy Teacher's room, in the principal's office, with our school Social Worker or a variety of other prearranged people and places. The school psychologist and I also wrote several Social Stories for him and encouraged his family to seek outside therapy as well as have a Neuropsych and many additional sceenings done.

That being said, a push between 6-year olds during a recess argument or an impulsive slap on the back are not behaviors I would respond to with this type of intensive intervention. These behaviors are probably occuring out of frustration due to lack of knowledge about how to communicate. If I were to only send the child away and not follow through with a problem solving conference, an apology of action, or role-modeling I would ultimately be doing a disservice to the child. My goal is to not only teach them not to hit, but more importantly... HOW to be empowered and respectful when comminicating frustrations or difficulties.

I'm not clear just by reading your post if you would also include these strategies along with your Take a Break chair, and I may not have made it clear that I might combine my strategies with the take a break chair (or more as indicated now) in my post. But I would look carefully at each situation and regard each with the thought of WHY the behavior is occuring in the first place. If we never get to the underlying cause, the behavior will alwys recur. It may not recur in our room, but it will emerge in other places (lunch, special subject areas etc) if the child is merely sent away and not taught any other coping strategies.

That is the beauty of RC.
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Time out
Old 10-19-2008, 07:10 AM
 
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I bought a "Time Out" round small rug. I tell the student to get the rug and a sand timer. I have 5, 3,2,1 minutes.....I give one to the student and he goes into the hall in front of our window and waits until all the sand passes through and thinks about what he did and what he should do to correct his actions.

He draws a picture and writes a sentence on a folded sheet of paper, when he returns. One side drawing and writing of what he did wrong and the other side .....drawing and sentence of correct behavior. Then he gives this paper to that person and gives an apology.


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great
Old 10-19-2008, 09:02 AM
 
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thanks for all the ideas...I have been doing some of these things mentioned above and wasn't sure if it was the an appropriate way to handle them. I am in a school that uses a color system and so sometimes i feel that they dont understand my consequences. Thanks for the ideas and encouragement to know that what I'm doing is best for kids. Thanks PT friends
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Old 10-20-2008, 07:25 PM
 
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Sorry....but logical consequences are not how it works in the real world. If I speed...I get a ticket. If I break another law, I get a fine/jail time etc. This notion of making everyone feel good is a whole lot of bologna if you ask me. I tried using responsive classroom, but my classroom management went right out the window. The teachers before me use it, and my students have now idea how to act. You may think I am 'mean' but now, I have a very structured system, and the children know exactly what to expect. They respect it, and so do I. I would never, never, never go back to that aspect of responsive classroom. I do the morning meeting, and I like it. That is about all I personally believe it.
 
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Those are logical consequences
Old 10-22-2008, 01:16 PM
 
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The examples you used are logical consequences. So, if you hurt someone's feelings, you don't apologize? If you break a pencil, you don't replace it?

I'm pretty sure that's the "real world"...

Responsive Classroom is very structured. It is about recognizing the social and emotional needs of your students as well as respecting your environment, others in your environment and following rules. The difference between what you're describing and my room is that my room is not a complete dictatorship. I am ultimately in control, and there are many things in my room that are done one way, but dictating their social/emotional well-being isn't one of them. I am not in control of my students' feelings, but I can help teach them how to be responsive in dealing with and communicating their feelings.

It seems you may have a misunderstanding of the RC approach. Feel free to get The First Six Weeks, Morning Meeting or any books by Paula Denton (The Power of Our Words, Teaching Children to Care are two ecellent resources) and read up on the approach. I think you may be surprised by what you learn!
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Old 10-25-2008, 12:03 AM
 
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The real world definitely has logical consequences....you don't pay your electric bill...it gets turned off, you drive drunk.....you hurt yourself/someone else.
My school implemented Morning Meeting this year, and most of the teachers were very reluctant. In fact, just two of us were excited. The two who had read and used RC before the school implementation. I truly feel that to fully understand RC you need to read all of the books (first 6 weeks, rules in school, teaching children to care). I also really liked Teaching with Love and Logic. It is not RC, but close, and has some great tips and "one liners" to respond to difficult situations.
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Old 10-25-2008, 11:53 AM
 
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I completely agree... So many people misunderstand RC thinking it's all peace and love, but it is about structure, rules and responsibility... but with a responsive approach to the whole notion of community and the social/emotional well-being of the child (and the adults).

I always like to think about how quick we are to complain when an administrator is overbearing, or a district is too tight regarding policy and never asking for our input. After all, we are the experts who work with these children, shouldn't we have a say in how we educate them? It's the same principle with RC. The children are part of a community and need to be taught how best to give input into the rules and routines of the classroom.

Well, I guess I just wanted to say I agree with you... RC is so much more than Morning Meeting.
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