Need advice on disruptive child - ProTeacher Community





Sheryl
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Sheryl
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Need advice on disruptive child
Old 07-02-2006, 04:33 AM
 
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We have a three year old child at our center who is sent to my office at least three times a day because of his scream and crying. This child has become very attached to his teacher and will not do as he is told. There is also a behavorist who comes in and during this time he is on his best behavior. Please advise me in how I can stop his disruptiveness when class is having circle?


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Ella
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Old 07-05-2006, 10:33 AM
 
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Sheryl,
I feel for you. I'm currently dealing with a simliar situation. Luckily, my director just sent me to a training on how to deal with behavioral challenges. It was soooo on target for the child I have problems with. Look into behavior modification techniques. Basically, the presenter (who was awesome, but local) focused on positive and negative reinforcement techniques.

A few points that really got my attention were:
*make sure you are not "accidently" reinforcing the child's behavior. ex: giving him attention +/- when he behaves inappropriately. (GUILTY!!!!) so ignore what you can
*observe carefully before you make any changes to see what the child is "getting" for his behavior
*if your center is like mine, there is no use of corporal punishment. Time-out was a joke for the little fellow I'm thinking of. (plus he got MORE attention in timeout instead of less)

What I am doing with my little guy is working, so far. His main inappropriate behavior is throwing fits. He throws a fit for any reason what so ever! So I took him aside before I began and showed him an empty corner in the most boring part of the classroom. I explained CALMLY and quickly, that if he throws a fit, he will go to the corner. And then I waited, didn't have to wait long. Fit throwing begins, I swoop over, scoop him up (without a word) and take him to the corner. Nose in corner, with me standing very closely behind him, so he cannot get out or hurt me. I put my arm on the wall, look at my watch, and say... "you threw a fit, you go to the corner" and wait. He's NOT happy at this point but he eventually starts to quiet. Then I say, "when you are calm, you will be able to leave the corner". When he is, I step back and let him walk away without a word. I did this about 5 times in the first 2 days. Very little attention is given to him when in the corner, but I am giving him as much constant attention as possible otherwise. ( High fives, and hugs, words of praise for the tiniest things) I do watch for warning signs of an impending fit and try to head it off by saying quietly, "if you throw a fit, you go to the corner".
He has begun to improve already after 3 days!!! This is a child who just moved up to my room, and has been a problem since he has been at our center. He's four now and has been with us since he was a baby. Since it is Summer, and we have a higher attendance right now, I am able to have 1 or 2 other adults in the class with me. This has helped tremendously. I could not have done this without them to continue the class routine, while I stand in behind him in the corner. I plan to continue for another few days and then have other staff do the same thing with him, so that he knows I am not the bad guy.

Hope this helps or applies to your situation... I would be interested in hearing more.
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Sheryl
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Sheryl
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discipline
Old 07-05-2006, 04:17 PM
 
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Ella
Thank you for advise. I will pass it along to my teacher and hope it will work.
Another problem I have is when teachers belittle a child infront of the class. They do not seem to understand that this can leave scares that will plague the child into his adult hood. Self esteem is a problem I have always had and it still creeps up on me. I do not know how to change the attitude of my teachers. Can anyone give me some suggestions?
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very surpris
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very surpris
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wow
Old 07-05-2006, 08:21 PM
 
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Ella,what kind of daycare or preschool do you work for?

I am very surprise that any professional could be promoting such act.

Placing a child in a corner is not the positive thing to do, maybe you need more training on how to deal with difficult children.

I fully understand your situation and believe me we all have been there,but., the whole corner thing thta is just not the way to go, what do the parents say?

It is degrating to the child.
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Sheryl
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Sheryl
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disappline
Old 07-09-2006, 04:12 AM
 
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very surpris's
what type of behavior modifications would you? We know that one of the problems is that he has become very attached to the teacher. There are times that he will not let her out of his sight. This in itself could be a problem.
I have some children in other classes that when I come in the will not let other children near me. I have told them that everyone can come and sit with me. We have an infant who will be moving up into the toddler area and she cries when I leave a room. I try not to stay long when I am in the infant area but what should I do to get her to understand that I will be in and out of the class more often ?
Any suggestions.


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why?
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why?
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Old 07-10-2006, 04:30 PM
 
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I understand your surprise but what kind of daycare or preschool do you work for? You are quick to judge, but offer no other ways for her to deal with this problem child. I have worked in a pre-k enviroment for 22 years with a master's in education and have no worries with the way she is dealing with this child. In a perfect world, time-out works, there is no corporal punishment, and we never have to raise our voices. Unfortunately, we are dealing more and more with lack of parent involvement, young inexperienced parents, and teachers that believe they make everything better. Placing a child in a corner is not supposed to be positive. It is a consequence for inappropriate behavior and perfectly acceptable.
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Sheryl
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Sheryl
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standing in the corner
Old 07-11-2006, 06:07 PM
 
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I do have to agree with why. As a child growing up in the sixties being put in the corner was the typical responds to misbehavior. The principal was not afaid to suspend an unruly child from school. Today we are expected to not only teach the children with problems but are hands are tied because one is afriad of law suits against them.
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Iteachlil1s Iteachlil1s is offline
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Iteachlil1s
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agree with why
Old 07-19-2006, 05:14 PM
 
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I don't understand the problem with a time-out in a less fun area of the classroom. Sometimes a child needs a soothing, quiet area where it's okay to calm down. I don't think a parent would have a problem with this. I am a preschool teacher and a mother of three children (including a 3yo with issues), and I would not have a problem with this. In fact, I would go so far as to say the child who is acting out so much might be overwhelmed in the classroom and need that break from the activity. It's not a bad idea to keep a playhut with stuffed animals and blankets in it available in the classroom, for when a child just needs to have some peace now and then.
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Jana
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Old 07-31-2006, 01:46 PM
 
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I suggest reading a book by Dan Gartrell called Positive Guidance. We have recently implemented it in our center and it works. He also writes an article in the Young Children Journal.

The basic concept is that children's negative behavior is mistaken behavior and they need to learn the correct way to behave and respond. It uses a cool down period (not time out) with the teacher and then mediation to solve the problem. It really helps kids learn problem solving. Good luck.
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cosmiclove87 cosmiclove87 is offline
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Old 12-26-2012, 09:27 PM
 
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Well i am a pre-k 3 yr old teacher. I have a student who screams and cries out of anything. He is not motivated to do any work also parents don't encourage him in home-learning , and becomes easily frustrated, when she doesn't know how to do something so he starts banging on the table or stabbing the pencil on the table. Also has a hard time following rules not only with me but with other teacher as well. also , he doesn't sleep during naptime, so it gets worse throught out the day, i really feel bad for the other teacher becuase she has to put up with his tantrums, obviously he didnt rest so hes crancky, moody and tired. So far I've been told by his parents they have a hard time putting him to sleep, because he wont sleep at all, so when he comes to school he has full blown tantrums and easily frustrated. What can you advise me with this student ?
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