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Getting a puppy?
Old 03-12-2018, 07:39 AM
  #1

My daughter is trying to talk me into a puppy. We had to put our 16 year old dog down in October. I'm retiring at the end of this school year and she says a puppy will keep me company. I told her that I don't want to have to train a dog. She promises to have it trained before she goes back to college. Thoughts?


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Old 03-12-2018, 07:50 AM
  #2

My parents adopted a dog that was a few years old and already house trained. They didn't want to go through training a dog again. It has worked out very well for them and the dog is great.
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I'd adopt an older dog
Old 03-12-2018, 07:54 AM
  #3

If it were me, I'd adopt a dog that is at least a few years old. It will be nice to have the company but frustrating to train a puppy.

Plus, when you're retired, you may want to pick up some hobbies and social engagements that you enjoy. If you have a young puppy, it will limit what you can realistically do, how long you can leave and when. An older dog will (probably) already be potty trained and maybe even crate trained.

Also, I'm sure your daughter has good intentions, but having a dog that is already mostly trained will allow her some freedom with her time while she's home. She won't have to spend it training a puppy and can see friends and family instead.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:05 AM
  #4

Going through this myself. I waiver between "I don't want a dog at all" and "maybe an older, trained dog."

Aside from not wanting to train a puppy, I'm not sure I actually want another pet. Maybe a canary...

Do you believe your daughter will completely follow through with the training and will the dog transfer his training to you?
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:09 AM
  #5

I'd pick a dog that wasn't a puppy. Training may not transfer between your daughter and you. Plus, as others mentioned, puppies restrict where you can go and what you can do. But if you adopt a dog that's a couple years old, you avoid the puppy stuff and can be away from the house longer.


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Old 03-12-2018, 08:48 AM
  #6

That's why I love my Greys. They come off the track at 2 or 3 already potty trained and crate trained. They're socialized and they sleep 20 hours a day.

Seriously, I love the idea of a dog but I know I'm not a puppy person. I don't have the patience for training. There are a ton of amazing dogs that are 2-5 years old that need homes. They're easier to train and out of that horrendous puppy stage. It sounds like a great compromise...if you REALLY want a dog. If you don't then it doesn't matter what age the dog is.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:40 AM
  #7

We adopted a puppy when my daughter was in high school. I had concerns but she wanted it so badly. My daughter was very dedicated to the dog and worked hard to train and love this dog. My concerns proved true and as her life got busier, the dog slowly became my dog. In our case, the dog has some aggression issues and when she got married the dog wasn't willing to share her attention. Now at a time in life where I want
to be free of responsibilities such as this, I have a nine year old love bug. Just saying, if you want another dog, go for it and let your daughter work through the puppy stages. Consider the possible outcomes and whether you are up to any of them.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:56 AM
  #8

I love puppies, but they are a lot of work. We had lost two dogs in the last few months, and I was thinking about getting a puppy. I ended up getting a rescue who is about a year and a half old. Perfect because sheís potty trained and crate trained. Also, sheís young enough that we will hopefully have her for a long time. Even though Iím retired, Iím not sure I would take on another puppy. Well, if I fell in love with one, I would, because Iím a sucker that way. But I wouldnít seek it out.
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Hmmm
Old 03-12-2018, 12:19 PM
  #9

I always have had dogs and always thought I would. When our last dog died, we were devastated. But then.... we found out how freeing not having a dog was. We can go out and meet for dinner and go on vacation when we want. You may want to go and visit your daughter at her college. It is not just training the dog- it is the day to day care.

If you really want a dog- get one. But don't be swayed by your dear daughter.
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One other thought
Old 03-12-2018, 12:37 PM
  #10

If you want a dog, but not the day to day responsibility because you want to be free to travel when you retire, you might consider fostering for a rescue group. Most groups are desperate for fosters. It's really the best of both worlds. You get a dog in the house, but the dog leaves when it gets adopted. You can choose when to take in a foster and when to take a break. It's hard to watch them go, but so rewarding knowing they're going to a wonderful home. Something to consider. You could even foster puppies (insert shudder here, but to each their own ).


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A tough decision...
Old 03-12-2018, 12:55 PM
  #11

I have had dogs from 8 months to 3.5 years when I first got them. They were all housebroken which was a big plus. They all needed leash training, and I was able to take two out of the three to basic obedience classes and one also took agility training, which was a lot of fun. I never opted for a puppy because of my long hours at work I didn't think it would be fair to such a young dog, and I didn't want to have to drive back and forth to the house from school to keep its schedule. You will be retired, so you will potentially have the time to spend with the dog, but if you want to travel or not be tied to the schedule a young dog like that might need, I would go a bit older. You can still have that puppy energy, but it wouldn't be as needy. Good luck with making the best decision for you.
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Old 03-12-2018, 01:23 PM
  #12

Everyone is different but I know when I retired I didn't want anyone or anything depending on me. I wanted to be responsibility free. Absolutely and totally free.

It surprised me because that is not my nature and while teaching I was involved in many things and responsible for many groups and things outside of school. This feeling lasted for the first 2 or 3 years of retirement.

A puppy is a responsibility that will last for years and years. Training and socializing a dog takes a lot of time and energy --- more than a summer holiday/break from school.

The puppy will bring you lots of things but freedom won't be one of them.
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Dogs
Old 03-12-2018, 01:58 PM
  #13

Love dogs and have always had them. However, Iíve said after my current ones pass I donít want anymore. They do tie you down and I want to be free to go visit my kids, etc.
Maybe someday when Iím done traveling, Iíll get another. Several of the people in my dadís senior living community have them.
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Old 03-12-2018, 05:32 PM
  #14

I haven't read the other posts yet, but I personally don't think it's a good idea. Yes, a puppy will keep you company, but after working for so many years and now finally being able to relax and have your own time frame - do you really want another responsibility? If you need company, you can go volunteer somewhere or invite friends/family over.
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They chew everthing!
Old 03-12-2018, 06:16 PM
  #15

Their teeth are soooo sharp! No matter how closely you watch them, they always seem to find something they should not and that's the end of that. Agree with the older dog idea, especially if it is already house trained. Total bonus!
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Old 03-12-2018, 06:53 PM
  #16

I like the idea of an older dog rather than a puppy! I would suggest at least 2 years old because for the most part they are done with chewing things up by then.

Nancy
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Old 03-12-2018, 07:13 PM
  #17

I think the biggest thing to think about is whether you want a new dog. Your dd goes back to college and the dog is on you - not her. If she wants a dog, she can get one when she has her own place.

I say don't make the decision based on your dd's desires. Dogs can keep you company and maybe give you motivation to get out and walk. But they also hold you back. Traveling means you have to find someone to watch them. If there are health issues, vet bills can add up fairly quickly. I have a dog that needs meds twice a day, and freaks out at storms - which means someone needs to be home if it looks stormy. . That isn't possible!

Anyway, I like the advice about older dog vs puppy, but decide whether YOU want a dog - not your dd. She can want a dog as much as she wants, but she won't be around to feed daily, pick up poop, groom, or play with it. That is on you.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:04 PM
  #18

My college daughter talked us into a puppy shortly after our beloved dog of 16 years died last year. Of course, in the fall, she was off to college and now guess who gets to take care of doggy? He chews up everything and it's like having a baby at our house. Although I love the new dog, he is a lot of work!!! I also hate that we can't go out of town without worrying about the dog. He is a lot of company, but he is also expensive, noisy, and very demanding. I am stuck with him, though, as I could never re-home an animal once I make that commitment.
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