O.D.D. student - help please! - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      ARCHIVE


O.D.D. student - help please!

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
michelle
 
 
Guest

michelle
 
 
Guest
O.D.D. student - help please!
Old 08-20-2005, 09:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I think we have a child in first grade this year that could be O.D.D. (Oppositional Defiance Disorder). Has anyone dealt with children like this? What did you do to create order in the classroom? His teacher is in her first year of teaching and doesn't know what to do with him. Any ideas or suggestions as to what worked for you, or what we should do as a school would be greatly appreciated!!!


  Reply With Quote

TeacherSteph TeacherSteph is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1
New Member

TeacherSteph
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1
New Member
O.d.d.
Old 08-31-2005, 03:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

When I was student teaching we also had a first grade student that we thought had O.D.D. It was very difficult. Often, it is not just a problem with the adults but also a problem with the O.D.D. student bothering other children.

We ended up moving this child's desk to a solitary area where he could see the board and participate but was out of arms reach of other students and distractions. We also kept minimal papers and supplies in his desk so that he would not have a lot to play around with. When he used back-talk we would make him sit outside of the classroom door until he calmed himself.

Later on we had a male 6th grade teacher who was very firm and serious that helped him. When the infraction was severe, we brought him down to this 6th grade teacher's room. The teacher would let this child know how disappointed and angry he was because he was not only disturbing the learning of his own class, but also the 6th grade class. He would then have a "talk" with this 6th grade teacher and the outside male authority seemed to help with this child.

Halfway through the year, he began seeing the school psychologist. I know they were working on anger management and things like that but as of the time I left, we had not yet had great results. I also know that there are medications available (as a last resort) for this condition. I believe they are similar to anti-depressents.

Sorry this is so long, but good luck!
TeacherSteph is offline   Reply With Quote
Cathy-Dee's Avatar
Cathy-Dee Cathy-Dee is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2000
Posts: 297
Full Member

Cathy-Dee
 
Cathy-Dee's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2000
Posts: 297
Full Member
O.D.D Students
Old 09-02-2005, 09:12 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Hi, I've had two students with O.D.D. but one was very extreme. I had him in grade 1 as well and had never experienced a child quite like this before.

O.D.D. students can be very difficult to work with but there are a few things you can do that will hopefully make it easier to handle the child most days.

1. Have an area in the room that can be blocked off or somewhat isolated that the student can go to when he is beginning to act up.

2. DO NOT argue with the child. You won't win. What I would do would be to give my student two choices. a) You can stay in the room and finish your work quietly now or b) You can finish your work later during your gym class.

3. Remember the student is not doing these things because they want to be in trouble - these children are very much attention-seeking. Track their outbursts and incidents to see if there is a pattern.

4. Try to get a Teacher-Assistant for the class - this way the teacher or assistant can remove the student if they are really upset and acting out.

5. I HIGHLY recommend a program called Non Violent Crisis Intervention. I just took the course (2 days) but if you have a child who gets upset and it shows physically on them by kicking, etc., this program will help you deal with it. My student would be fine for days and then would just lose it - when it was extreme he would be hitting and kicking, etc.,

6. Find out as much about his background and family as possible. See if his family is willing to work with the school. If he is not in any type of therapy work towards getting him into some type of therapy.

7. Be very consistent and follow routines - I found changes would set him off easily.

I hope this helps, there's no perfect solution out there - but if you keep trying all the little things it will make a difference at least.
Cathy-Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Crystal
 
 
Guest

Crystal
 
 
Guest
O.D.D. student
Old 10-02-2005, 12:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have also had a child who was O.D.D. He was a severe case. I used a card that I put on his table that had 5 columns and 5 rows. Each day he was "good" he would recieve a sticker. If he filled up the top row (5 blocks) he got a treat such as ice cream from the lunch room and the same with each row BUT when he filled up the entire card I would go to the dollar store and buy him something. Then he would take the card home with him. And we would start over. This took a little while for him to realize that if he tried hard he would be rewarded. Also, having him be my "helper" worked wonders as well. They just need attention.

Yelling doesn't make it better!
  Reply With Quote
brown_one brown_one is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 9
New Member

brown_one
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 9
New Member
reaction
Old 08-11-2008, 08:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

As said earlier, typically the ODD students I've had in the past were more interested in my reaction to their behaviors. You may be totally burning upset inside, but you can't reveal this to them. Still handle the situation appropriately, but ceep your cool in how you react. And as posted earlier... never argue, you'll just upset yourself more.


brown_one is offline   Reply With Quote
lisalisa
 
 
Guest

lisalisa
 
 
Guest
Kindergarten Teacher 2 in class w/ O.D.D.
Old 03-13-2009, 03:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Hi I am a seasoned teacher of 17 years and this is my first experience with O.D.D. Lucky me this year I ended up with Two of them. One student has been in my room since day one. The other transfered in after second semester started!!!! They play off of each other. Just this week one had a melt down shortly after our morning routine was interupted by a fire drill. He kicked and screamed and was removed from the class by the councelor. The next day my second student did the same thing( for no reason but melt down started the same) I don't know if the full moon this week had anything to do with it or not but it is very hard and very disruptive to my other Kindergarteners. I am firm and I give clear choices about what I need them to do. I give stickers every hour on the hour that they comply with my classroom rules.I have a chart in a folder for them. They get to place their own sticker in there when they have behaved.They also earn 5 minutes of computer time as a reward. But... Any change in our routine will set them off. The outburst seem to be more frequent now that there are two of them or because Spring is around the corner I don't know. Please PLease Help if you have any advice!!! COunting down the days unitl the end of school~Lisa
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ARCHIVE
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:17 AM.


Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net