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Teacherbee_4 Teacherbee_4 is offline
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:22 AM
 
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Just a petty vent. Do people not respond to "thank you" anymore? All year, I've been dealing with this my students. I say "thank you" for something and they don't respond. I've explained it's polite to acknowledge a thank you. While I know "You're welcome" is the standard response, I don't even mind if I get a "Yup", "yeah", "sure", "any time", or even a "umhuum"! Any sort of acknowledgement is fine with me! Even after explaining that a response is always a polite thing, they still don't always do it. I end up repeating my thank you until they respond. I thought maybe it was just this class, as I never had this problem with other students. Then, today, I'm at my parents house for Easter. My dad just brought me some food to try and I said "Thank you". He didn't respond. I said "Thank you" again, and he didn't respond. It took 3 times for him to respond. Do people just not respond anymore?

I know in the whole scheme of things it's not a big deal, but it's becoming a pet peeve of mine!


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Old 04-01-2018, 07:34 AM
 
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I certainly still say, you're welcome. Heck, I say it even when messaging/chatting w/ people online.

I don't talk to different people much these days, so it's hard for me to say if people still say it. For the most part, store employees don't really say it when they ring me up. They barely mumble anything at all as I take my bag while I'm leaving.
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You’re welcome!
Old 04-01-2018, 07:45 AM
 
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I think people still need to say this. I am irritated to hear “No problem” as a response, usually by servers in restaurants, or cashiers. I also notice that frequenty I don’t hear “Thank you” which makes it hard for me to model a proper response!
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:49 AM
 
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I don't have a problem with "no problem." At least it is an acknowledgement that something was said.

I also hate it when you greet someone and get nothin back. "Good morning." No eye contact even. I think I am going to talk about that my first day next year. If I can take the time to stand in the door and greet you, you can return the greeting.
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Old 04-01-2018, 08:17 AM
 
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Speaking of saying, "No Problem", I personally never liked it when people say that because that to me means that they really mean that it was an inconvenience for them, but no problem that I'm asking them to basically do their job that they're supposed to do anyway (and/or getting paid to do).



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"no problem"
Old 04-01-2018, 10:25 AM
 
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In response to a "thank you" the words "no problem" can sound like the act of the giver no big deal and that reduces their act of kindness. Teaching others to say "It was my pleasure" or "I'm so glad I could help you".

Keep expecting kids to say "You're welcome" or some other meaningful reply.
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:57 AM
 
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My 2-year-old says "you're welcome." It's not that hard to teach.
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Old 04-01-2018, 11:50 AM
 
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Interesting read, I though. http://allthingslinguistic.com/post/...-youre-welcome

Quote:
‘No problem’, coming from a millennial’s mouth, within the context of helping someone – whether it be holding a door open/picking up something someone may have dropped/etc. – and, naturally, being thanked for it, implies that the kind gesture was indeed, not a problem, that it was just the thing to do, that they were happy to help and that no thanks was really necessary.
If you choose to be offended by a comment meant in kindness, so be it. I choose to go through my days not looking for ways to be upset by others. Its better just to accept something as intended rather than read something into it.
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Old 04-01-2018, 04:32 PM
 
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"No problem" doesn't bother me at all. I take it as reassurance that I'm not inconveniencing the person.
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Great Comments..but the one that really gets
Old 04-01-2018, 04:44 PM
 
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I came from a different generation where the store clerks ALWAYS said Thank You. Now they never do and because of the absence of those words, I found myself thanking THEM. I've tried to break that habit because it seems weird. But the silence is disconcerting.

Some of the younger ones will say, "Have a good one." So the first time I noticed it I was buying some beer for a tgif, and that kinda embarrassed me because I'm not much of a drinker. It was like, "Have a good one you old drunk."

I've come to not mind the "Have a good one" Especially since I heard my teen granddaughter say that to a customer checking out in her line.

Okay, so the one I dislike is for the young men to call me Miss. I'm clearly an old bag now, so don't call me a Miss.

BUT the one that makes my fur stand on end is Hun. I will preface this with: I give 20 percent tips..even to starbucks. If I hear someone harassing a cashier, I'll get after them. I am sooo nice to workers. HOWEVER, there was that time when I went to my favorite restaurant and the greeter said ...Blah blah blah...Hun. I really did snarl, "Don't call me that. That's demeaning." She mentioned something that she had spent some time down South. I'm in California. So yeah, she was experimenting. Anyway, never call me Hun.


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no problemo
Old 04-01-2018, 04:56 PM
 
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I was raised to say, "You're welcome." As years have passed though, I do not feel comfy saying it a lot of times because I do not want the person to take it as I was inconvenienced by whatever I did. ( When I do something nice, I do it because I want to or choose to do it. I do not want the person to feel like it is charity.) Also, we were raised to be very humble. Maybe years of living in another culture, IDK, changed the way I talk. I am more likely to say, "any time, no problem, sure, or glad you like or can use it." " You're welcome" just doesn't feel right to ME anymore.
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You're welcome ( funny)
Old 04-01-2018, 05:53 PM
 
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A few times after I had received a thank you note from someone I sent a card that said, "You're welcome." On the inside it said, "I just received your thank you card and I wanted to let you know that You're welcome." They senders thought it was hilarious.

I used to say, no problem after someone said Thank you, now I always say, "You're welcome"
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Old 04-01-2018, 08:15 PM
 
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Any acknowledgement is fine with me including "no problem," but I agree that it's always nice to get an acknowledgement either vocally or through a smile or nod.

My bigger problem is with people not saying "thank you!"
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Old 04-01-2018, 09:22 PM
 
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I'm a millennial and "no problem" to me means exactly what Kahlua posted. I was really confused as to why people would think it was rude. I say it all of the time, although maybe I should rethink that!

As another interesting twist to this discussion, part of our PD at the beginning of this school year was about using authoritative language when telling students to do something rather than using passive or aggressive language. My P doesn't want us to say "please" and "thank you" with students when directing them to do basic things because that's considered passive.

For example, "Sit here" would be the authoritative direction, "Please sit here...thank you" would be the passive direction, and "Where do you see everyone else sitting?" would be the aggressive direction. Our beginning of the year walkthroughs were based on what kind of language we were using with students!
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Old 04-02-2018, 04:45 AM
 
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To piggyback off Haley, it is also common (and unwise) to parse a command as a request: Would you like to join us? Instead of: Come sit in group area.

The first appears to give the student a choice, lol.
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Old 04-02-2018, 05:40 AM
 
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In the northeast where I am, it's normal and usually accepted to respond with "Yep", "No problem", "Sure" when a person thanks you.
Years ago, I went down south to visit a friend. She told me she was cringing each time I spoke to another adult (especially an older one) because I would use those responses when I was thanked.
I think it's more of the tone and the sincerity that I care about. In general, I have an outgoing personality. Maybe I offended someone with my northern ways but I moved on.
I'm not saying that anyone in this thread nags students to say 'you're welcome', etc. I certainly wouldn't nag or hound a kid to say anything. That would seem counterproductive to me.
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I can be a cultural thing, too.
Old 04-02-2018, 12:38 PM
 
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Some languages have no equivalent for "you're welcome". You say thank you, and that's it. No further acknowledgment needed.
I should say traditionally. Some languages have "invented" a phrase that approximates "you're welcome", but that's in response to exposure to Americans. I think "you're welcome" is a mostly American response (I may be mistaken).
Most of the international students students I've taught do not automatically say "thank you" because it's not part of their culture. I do teach that "thank you" is the polite response, but I do not require "you're welcome", simply because it is unnecessary.
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You’re Welcome
Old 04-02-2018, 12:57 PM
 
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Interesting...this article appeared in my local news feed.

http://www.kcra.com/article/people-d...lcome/19661942
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Old School Here
Old 04-02-2018, 06:56 PM
 
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And I firmly believe in saying” Thank you” “Your welcome” “Please” , and reinforcing those words with my grands.
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No Problem with No Problem....
Old 04-03-2018, 09:43 AM
 
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but I do get frustrated when salespeople do not say thank you. Sometimes, I will say thank you to the salesperson (hoping they may pick up on it), usually I get "Oh, you're welcome," like they have done me a favor.
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Old 04-03-2018, 10:44 AM
 
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I say "no problem" and "of course" as replies all the time. I think it means that I enjoyed helping you as in, it caused me no problems and I was glad to do it.

HOWEVER I also don't like "hun". That's something reserved for my spouse or younger children, in my opinion. I had a coworker (cashier) that would call everyone hun or sweetheart, including middle aged people and older people. It was so awkward to be there when she did that.
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thank you
Old 04-03-2018, 10:48 AM
 
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Quote:
I am irritated to hear “No problem” as a response, usually by servers in restaurants, or cashiers.
Yes!! I was about to type that and I saw your response 4leaves! That is irritating to me! Your welcome and no problem mean two different things to me.

Your welcome= glad to have served you
No problem=It wasn't a problem to do my job (not having anything to do with serving you)
Grrrr:: my pet peeve
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Old 04-04-2018, 09:35 PM
 
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At the IYT (Incredible Years Teaching) course I went to, we were told to ask the child to do something and end with Thank You as it makes the assumption you know they will do what they have been asked - positive forecasting. You might say ' Johnny, stop talking to your friend, Thank You' (looks odd written, sounds better spoken, if THAT makes any sense )

I also have no issue with 'No problem' and use it myself with the same meaning as others (it was no trouble and a pleasure) but just don't call me Ma'am!
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