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70Primrose 70Primrose is offline
 
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Help! Do teachers have any rights?
Old 09-18-2019, 06:56 PM
 
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I teach 4th grade. I have a monster of a kid in my class this year. Behavior is an absolute mess. LONG, LONG story, was ERR under Developmental Disability, pulled out of the last school for extreme disruptive behavior and hitting a teacher. Homeschooled for a year. Lost eligibility for ERR, does not qualify now. Has no diagnosis and guardians/grandparents are against "labels" and meds. Our school phycologist feels he is autistic, but can't say that to the guardians. Today he even made our most mild-mannered teacher raise her voice! She only has him for a half-hour. They heard her in the class next door!

How much do I have to put up with? I can't teach! He is so disruptive!! Is there anything I can do? Do teachers have any rights or support? My principal hates confrontation and she will back down from anything. Seriously, is there anything I can do? Is there anything for me and my protection? I don't think I can make it through this year.


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Old 09-18-2019, 07:44 PM
 
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First of all, I'm so sorry for what you are going through! It's unfair to you and your other students! I'm not sure what ERR stands for.......
We've had situations at our school where teachers have had VERY difficult students who should have other placements. First, go to your principal and your assistant principal and your resource teacher and explain what is going on. Ask for an emergency Student Study Team meeting. Then document everything that goes on. Also, if you have a behavior specialist in your district, call that person. Ask the guardians to conference with you and show them your documentation. Call them every week or every day if necessary. If any parent of another student complains, refer them to your principal. Sometimes parent complaints will get things in motion. See if you can find a behavior management system that the student will try to work for. Be a squeaky wheel! It doesn't sound like this child is properly placed, and this does a HUGE disservice to him and all of the other students in your class. They have a right to learn! I hope things look up for you soon!
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70Primrose 70Primrose is offline
 
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Err
Old 09-18-2019, 08:30 PM
 
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is what we call our special Ed. Extended resource room. They have done all the testing, ALL! He qualifies for nothing! He has no diagnosis so we can’t even give him a 504. He passes the academic tests just enough so he does not qualify for an IEP. Our Spec Ed teacher keeps apologizing to me that she could not get him in. It is not her fault. My principal does not take care of us teachers. I feel completely unsupported by admin. I love our vice principal but our principal is a micromanager and only lets her handle maintenance and tech issues.
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Old 09-19-2019, 02:55 AM
 
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Look at your state's Ed code . In some states teachers can still have a child removed from the classroom. Be sure to press charges if you are injured by this child. Get other parents to raise hell for the loss of their child's learning minutes.
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Document everything
Old 09-19-2019, 03:28 AM
 
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I am so sorry you are going through this situation now. I remember how physically and mentally exhausting this can be during a day.

2teach2 has very good suggestions. I am stressing documenting everything-how you give the child directions (verbal cues and visual cues), different teaching strategies (maybe you used a song followed with movement to further reflect a follow-up lesson), and record how many outburst he has. What happened before the outburst? What happened afterwards?

It is a lot of record keeping! It maybe be the first step to get the child placed in the correct environment. Arm yourself with information and ask for help.


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Old 09-19-2019, 05:18 AM
 
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Don’t read if you only want “professional” responses.

A friend of mine had a student like that years ago. The student was easily set off, so she “arranged” for a room-destroying tirade, the kind where she had to remove all other students from the room for their safety, while parents were there to observe. Parents do not want their kids in an unsafe environment and they have a much more powerful voice than teachers.
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Old 09-19-2019, 06:08 AM
 
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If he has no diagnosis and no IEP it should be much easier to get him out of your classroom. If he had actually been diagnosed as autistic it would be much more difficult but you would also (hopefully) be getting more help in managing his behavior.

I agree that, if you have a wimpy principal, you're going to have to rely on the parents of the other students in the class to kick up enough of a fuss that she'll be forced to deal with the situation.

ETA: But, if he is autistic, a teacher raising her voice to him might trigger a meltdown. Several years ago I dealt with a student who was thought to be autistic but who was undiagnosed (same thing - parents didn't want him labeled) and we all just dealt with him the same way that we would deal with an autistic child. It didn't resolve the situation, really, but I think it reduced the frequency of violent meltdown behavior.
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Old 09-19-2019, 07:24 AM
 
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I have to agree with Tori and Primrose. Document everything. Carry post it’s notes with you all the time. Write down date, time, and a quick note of behavior. Write up a longer report when you have time.

Since admin won’t back you up, at some point you might have to go further up the food chain.

And, if everyone highly suspects he is on the spectrum, start treating him as such. It will bring down everyone’s anxiety.
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Old 09-19-2019, 07:42 AM
 
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I agree with Amiga. Teachers have no rights, but parents have power. I don't know about your relationship with the other parents but maybe you can find a way to get them to express concerns to the P. I had situations similar to this my last 2 years of teaching and found out no one cared about what I went through and what my other students were going through. It was definitely one of the reasons I retired early. I had planned on teaching at least a couple more years, but I just got really fed up with the whole system.
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Old 09-19-2019, 07:57 AM
 
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Sounds like he's emotionally handicapped ????


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Old 09-19-2019, 02:40 PM
 
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In my state, a student like this could be referred to the school social worker to conduct a functional behavior assessment; then based on his/her assessment, a behavioral intervention plan could be written. Students do not have to have an IEP or a 504 to have a BIP. Talk to your guidance counselor and ask if and how FBAs and BIPs are handled.

Like others said, document everything, including behaviors and consequences. Have your support specialists (art and music teachers, librarians, etc) also document what happens in their classes as well. If he is so disruptive that you cannot teach, or if he is endangering you or the other students; he needs to be sent (or escorted) to the principal's office. Perhaps if Ms. Hates-Confrontation gets tired of dealing with him, that will motivate her to do something about this situation.
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Old 09-20-2019, 03:58 AM
 
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I agree with Amiga. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do and they say a picture is worth a thousand words. I had a child once who hurt other children and destroyed the room any time she didn't get her way about something. She had also hit/kicked/pinched several of us teachers. Nothing was being done except a couple of conferences with her parents who had no idea how to deal with her and said so.

So, one day the principal was in the room doing my observation and I "arranged" it so this girl did not get to pick the center she wanted. She began hitting/pinching other children and destroying the room like she usually did. When the principal tried to intervene, the little girl hit her too. Guess what? The principal gave her three days suspension and met with the parents to insist on an alternative school placement. She was afraid other parents would get upset about their kids being hurt (they had already started to complain).
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Old 09-20-2019, 05:36 PM
 
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To answer your question, No, teachers don’t have rights. I agree with doing what you need to do. You’re in a horrendous, stressful situation. We all sympathize! That child needs more help than you can provide. It’s not a good placement.

As suggested, you must document, even if it disrupts your teaching. Date, time, come up with a list of codes so you can do this quickly. When it becomes unbearable, call the office. State you need help, situation unsafe or so disruptive that instruction can’t occur. You need to make it a problem for the office, principal, whomever. Then you need to get parents aware of situation without coming right out and saying it. There’s always parents who hang around. If they ask how you are, say something about not getting everything done due to disruptions. Eventually they’ll ask what is happening. Sometimes a student isn’t ready to learn and we have to stop.
What would be ideal is if a parent volunteer saw it in action. I always feel sorry for the rest of the class.

Hope you can destress this weekend!
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Old 09-21-2019, 04:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Sometimes parent complaints will get things in motion.
I agree. Make sure, somehow (without actually breaking rules, of course) that the parents find out. Once they all start asking for their kids to be moved away from this one, admin will listen.
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Old 09-21-2019, 07:33 AM
 
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Another reason why I love you! I have had to “set up” students in order for them to get the help they deserve. It may not be “professional”, but it’s the right thing to do, for the good of all.
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