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Stress Fracture in Foot? Bruised?
Old 12-15-2012, 03:58 PM
 
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I've been having on and off pain in the bottom of my foot near the toes (like the ball of the foot but more towards the toe line). I'm thinking it is a lasting effect of my knee injury, from limping for 8 months. From what I've read it could be a stress fracture?

The only other thing I realized is that my foot might be slightly swollen too. You can't notice by looking at it (I think) but I can tell because my shoes that once fit just fine are now on the tight side.

I know I should get it looked at to make sure but I've been through enough with the knee and have been putting it off. I think I've been paranoid about doctors ever since my OS said that I must have problems, as he held up my chart to me, during my last visit. (in regard to my knee not healing quickly).


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Old 12-15-2012, 06:51 PM
 
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Could be plantar plate related. Research hammer toe and plantar plate swelling. I tape my toes together when my feet hurt, and it helps. It keeps structures stable and reduces wear and tear
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:05 PM
 
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Until you find out elevate and ice, elevate and ice, elevate and ice.
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:19 PM
 
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My son had a stress fracture in his foot and I was a bit shocked. He said he had hurt his toe (stubbed it pretty good) in a football game the year before. The trainer said the way the had been walking on it caused the stress fracture...could this be something similar to you walking differently due to your knee injury? I hope you get better soon!
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Neuroma?
Old 12-16-2012, 02:26 AM
 
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Does it feel like you are walking on a marble on the ball of your foot? May be a Morton's neuorma.

I have plantar fasciitis which is under control, and then THIS. Ugh. I just want me feet to feel better.

A cortisone shot may help, but you would have to rule out a fracture first. The worst that can happen is they put you in a boot so you can heal. Foot pain = misery.


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foot
Old 12-16-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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I went to the doctor who said I had torn my ligament. I went to PT who disagreed with the doctor. I had both knees replaced five years ago which weakens the legs muscles. I don't think most people work on their leg strength very much. The PT had me work on strengthening my feet, legs and core. It has helped a lot. I continue to work on my legs after completing PT. Hope this helps
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