Two para jobs the past couple weeks - and other things - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Substitute Teachers

Two para jobs the past couple weeks - and other things

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
cenWApara cenWApara is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 19
New Member

cenWApara
 
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 19
New Member
Two para jobs the past couple weeks - and other things
Old 10-07-2018, 05:13 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hi everyone,
I'm still subbing as a parapro in two school districts. One is local and the other is 8 miles away and they almost never call me because it's a small town of 7,000 where everybody knows everybody...
So far I've had a total of two jobs the past 3-4 weeks. I could have had 12 or 15 different jobs, but they were all 1-on-1 special ed at the middle school which I am not interested in. Not to mention the student has violent outbursts and it even says that in the notes! I keep the MS on my list because there's 2 or 3 gen-ed paras that I'm able to work for.
First of all, the district that fired me last year had their sub para pool open again this year, but even with an updated disclosure form AND three updated references, along with a new HR director (replacing the one that told me I was better off 'as a janitor'), they still kept their heads in the sand and rejected me from their sub pool for '18-'19. Ugh. I just love how a 7-year-old brat cost me my job. I'm sure he went crying home to mommy and daddy, told a completely different 'story'. I've already talked about said situation in this forum, back in the spring.

So the two jobs I've had were both at the same elementary school, one for a temp para and another for the library para which I really enjoyed. I subbed a couple weeks ago for the library para and had a lot of fun. Read Ghost Buddy (by Henry Winkler!) to two third-grade classes and they enjoyed it. I had a couple of disruptive boys in the 3PM class who kept interrupting me. I also read a book to 1st graders about taking care of library books, can't remember it off the top of my head...and did recess/patrol duty as well. A little hectic, but great to work for. She has put me on her preferred list BTW.

The other job was a temporary para who I thought was for LAP, but it ended up being self-contained Sp-Ed. Kind of a culture shock for me, as I'm not used to that kind of environment. Some negative notes to share:
- We had an autistic 4th grader refuse to do his task, and he proceeded to scream at 100dB and throw books everywhere. The other paras grabbed him and took him out of the classroom. He lost 1st recess as well and Dad has to come in for a discipline meeting next week. But when he did reading groups with me, it was a piece of cake...
- At recess, one of the 3rd graders threw a basketball at me (I think on accident), hitting me in the leg. I asked him 'did you throw that basketball at me?' He then proceeded to grab me by the coat and tried to push me onto the ground, told him to stop it and 'get off me!' at least three times before another para took him out. He lost the next recess BTW.
- Some more miscellaneous stuff: the class has a low-functioning K or 1st girl who is non-verbal and still is in diapers. One of the paras changed her diaper twice while I was working there. They read to her once, she participated in the art project (making ghosts out of cotton balls and googly eyes) briefly, but most of the time she was either drawing, walking around making noises, or half-watching Disney movies in the 'safe space' next door. Does this seem like a good approach for working with a student this disabled? Seems like babysitting to me. They aren't teaching her enough IMO. There were students who didn't like the 'good morning song' and thus wore earmuffs too. I could see why, talk about an earworm. Another one didn't like the movie they showed at lunch and wore earmuffs too. Not to mention with the movie going, socializing is refrained. Most of the kids only see gen-ed students at recess! When I was in elementary school, autistic students were mainstreamed in gen-ed with an aide. Only one or two kids in this school's self-contained were in the regular classroom 3 hours of the day. I also noticed a lot of redirecting, almost every student negatively called on.

Positively, I had a great reading group, both the 3rd and 4th grade students listened attentively to the story, followed along with the questions, and we actually finished the lesson!

AESOP's trying to get me to take 8 days worth of middle school 1-on-1...I think not. I'm hoping I'll keep getting jobs, but I'll stick with gen-ed for now. No offense.
-cenWApara


cenWApara is offline   Reply With Quote

teabreak teabreak is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,516
Senior Member

teabreak
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,516
Senior Member
Sped teacher here
Old 10-07-2018, 06:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

As a sped teacher, I could comment many ways on what you have written here. Instead, I will say that you may want to get a degree in special education before you determine what is best for a child or children that you have spent minimum time with.

The young lady watching movies.....maybe that was written into her IEP.

The young child who grabbed you, would you be ok with him/her being in a general education classroom and doing the same to other students? If it caught you off guard, imagine what the damage he could do to smaller children?

I'm not meaning to come off sounding cranky, but some people don't understand why special ed teachers and case managers do what we do. We know the child and there are certain limits. The sad part is that you don't seem to want to see the beauty in these children, and that makes me feel badly for you. Good luck with your general ed jobs.
teabreak is offline   Reply With Quote
cenWApara cenWApara is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 19
New Member

cenWApara
 
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 19
New Member

Old 10-07-2018, 09:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Yes, I know I haven't been used to this type of environment yet. It's difficult being a substitute in sped, with all of the 504's and IEPs, knowing every child has different difficulties whether severe or mild...also BTW I had two kindergarten girls in the reading group, and it was quite difficult to get them to say the words assigned. I tried to sound out the syllables for them, with about 50-50 success. Some of the kids were quite fun to be around, I will say. A couple of the older kids did great with the reading groups and hung around at recess to talk to me, which was nice. Every school has a different mix of students, perhaps some of the other elementary schools in my district do sped a little differently, but I haven't really talked to my sub coordinator yet. And, everyone has different preferences. Some are fit for sped, others not so much.

I'm studying for my Elem Ed. B.A. which I should get in a couple of years. More experience will help.
cenWApara is offline   Reply With Quote
Kailey123 Kailey123 is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 274
Full Member

Kailey123
 
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 274
Full Member

Old 10-08-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

teabreak -- this is exactly why I won't sub in special ed jobs, except for two of the sped resource teachers at my regular school because I know exactly what they do and I know the kids they have (both push-in and pull-out). But the self-contained classes and especially the self-contained autism classes...no way. I am not trained at all in SPED and I just have no understanding of how to communicate with them, and what to do -- and even more so, what NOT to do. My biggest fear is that I'll do something that's not appropriate for that particular child's learning plan and I don't want to be responsible for undoing the regular teacher's hard work. -- My district has great difficulty in getting subs to take the SPED jobs and every day there are at least 10 or so sped assistants (I think what the OP is called "para"...?) that go untaken. I know two other subs who feel like I do though....we're afraid to make a mistake since we have no sped training.

The kids who are "inclusion" -- which in this district means they spend part or all of their day in a regular classroom, maybe pulled out for math or language arts, with support from the sped resource teacher. Those are good for me -- either subbing for the regular teacher, or for the sped resource teacher -- because I can watch the other teacher in action. I've learned a lot from just watching, and now that I know certain specific kids I'm totally fine with them because I know what to do and what not to do. I always want to be sure to follow the plan exactly with kids who have a problem with new things (i.e., me) and with change.
Kailey123 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Substitute Teachers
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:21 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net